Rehome or keep my second bunny?

Discussion in 'General Rabbit Discussion' started by moppysan, Sep 22, 2019.

Help Support Rabbits Online by donating:

  1. Sep 22, 2019 #1

    moppysan

    moppysan

    moppysan

    New Member

    Joined:
    Sep 22, 2019
    Messages:
    3
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Arizona
    Greetings!

    I come today with a need for advice. I recently adopted a bunny - Moppy, 11 months old now, Mini-Lop - who needed to desperately be rehomed from a craigslist ad. He is very sweet and I love him very much. This was about 3 months ago.Fast forward to about 1 month ago and my girlfriend convinced me to go forward with adopting another bunny - Bunzago, 4 months old now, Holland Lop - who needed desperate rehoming from a craigslist ad as well. I tried to tell her we should take it slow, but we ended up getting him before checking either of the bunnies' compatibility with each other.

    Now, here's the problem. I have been having them stay in separate living areas but with a gate separating the two. I've attempted bonding, but they are both not neutered (males) and are having a hard time establishing dominance/relationship. I was still deciding on things, such as neutering because the cost is high, and I was not sure if they would even be a right fit for each other. As of recent, one of them managed to get near the other (4 month old had hoped over his cage, something we did not know was possible due to his small size) and have caused each other very minor skin wounds (scabs have formed). This does not happen when we put them in a neutral area to bond such as the tub or tile floor, which they both find very uncomfortable. Aggression to the point of nipping to draw blood has only happened when they enter each other's territory. Typically, Bunzago will hump Moppy who will not do much other than sit there and be on the receiving end, almost ignoring. No real progress feels to have been made regarding the two.

    What I ask for is, will neutering possibly solve their aggressive behavior towards each other, enough to bond? Or will they always have this sort of relationship even past neutering? I love both of them, but if I had to say, I have a stronger attachment to Moppy, and Bunzago is okay to be rehomed if I need to. The financial portion is kind of hard on me (college student working hard at multiple jobs) to neuter them both, but it's not impossible as I will never slack on their vet care despite any costs. I do not mind hearing the cold hard facts and if they are just not compatible, please let me know and I will do my best to rehome Bunzago to someone. Thank you.

    P.S. My original plan was to get a friend for Moppy so that when I'm gone for a long shift at the hospital (nursing student) he will be less alone as they have each other.
     
  2. Sep 22, 2019 #2

    ESA

    ESA

    ESA

    Member

    Joined:
    Sep 13, 2019
    Messages:
    10
    Likes Received:
    2
    Location:
    Texas
    Hi, neutering is something that is highly recommended due to the fact is does help with some territorial behaviors and it is better for their over overall health. For jumping I believe the fence/gate has to be at least 30 inches high or more.

    Are you aware of basic care such as large enough area, hay 24/7 (large amounts) , fresh leafy greens daily, litter box that is big enough to turn around fully, rabbit toys, and a hiding area? :) When the rabbits are bonded do you plan to free roam them? There are many useful tips on how to rabbit proof your home.

    The behavior you have seen is common , but they must both be neutered in order to continue with the bonding process. Bonding can be tricky and take weeks, sometimes months.

    It is extremely important that they do not get to each other again in a non neutral area. After being neutered and having some time to heal you could continue meetings in a neutral area.

    Could you possibly post a picture of their areas?

    Hopefully others with more experience will stop by.
     
  3. Sep 22, 2019 #3

    moppysan

    moppysan

    moppysan

    New Member

    Joined:
    Sep 22, 2019
    Messages:
    3
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Arizona
    I can't post a pictures of their areas at the moment, but I can guarantee they have very spacious places to roam, are petted/played/handled with daily, and are given the best basic care I can provide with 24/7 hay and all the other necessities, especially providing varied leafy greens when able. We had owned a bunny before for a few years but he had passed away due to G.I. Stasis... this was fairly recently before Moppy. I just want to make sure that I am making the right decision, versus possibly rehoming Bunzago and going toward a bunny to adopt from a shelter who may have better compatibility, and be neutered/spayed already. I plan to get Moppy neutered in the next month regardless. This is our first time with trying to bond bunnies.
     
  4. Sep 22, 2019 #4

    moppysan

    moppysan

    moppysan

    New Member

    Joined:
    Sep 22, 2019
    Messages:
    3
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Arizona
    Update: I may just end up neutering them and continuing with the bonding process. After looking at the cost of one of the spay/neuter threads, I'm going to continue looking as it appears I may be getting "price-gouged" at certain vets. I just learned there is a humane society here that has rabbits, so I'm going to see what they can do :) I still would like to know if they are an okay match, and if bonding will still be a great idea. Thank you :)
     
  5. Sep 22, 2019 #5

    ESA

    ESA

    ESA

    Member

    Joined:
    Sep 13, 2019
    Messages:
    10
    Likes Received:
    2
    Location:
    Texas
    I know some recues / humane society will help find a good match for your rabbit and some will actually help you bond your two rabbits. I think the best thing to do would neuter your boys and get help bonding from a place like that. You really can not be sure if they are a good match now until you get them neutered and attempt the bonding again. It is extremely important that they are not together in a non neutral area for quite some time. Always end a bonding session with something positive like petting them or giving them a tasty treat ( tasty but healthy!). :)

    Again hopefully others who have bonded many will give advice. :)
     

Share This Page