Rabbit scared of humans

Discussion in 'General Rabbit Discussion' started by Hermelin, Apr 15, 2018.

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  1. Apr 15, 2018 #1

    Hermelin

    Hermelin

    Hermelin

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    Today I went to see a rabbit I’m going to buy if the owner thinks I’m a good owner for him. But I noticed he was scared and stressed when being picked up and being approached by his owner. Didn’t tell her that her rabbit was stressed and scared while growling.

    If I get to buy him, I wonder how to teach him to trust humans. He’s a lovely rabbit and really curious even though he’s scared.

    So need tips on how to make a scared rabbit tame and win his trust.

    Does it take as long time with making a kit tame?
     
  2. Apr 15, 2018 #2

    Cookiemonster

    Cookiemonster

    Cookiemonster

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    Take it slow... sit in a room and let the bun come to you... hold your hand out let the bun sniff it... take it easy and act as if your not paying attention to it... if you have any other questions feel free to message me..
     
  3. Apr 15, 2018 #3

    Hermelin

    Hermelin

    Hermelin

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    Thanks, I know his favorite treat so I’m going to use that when bonding with him.

    But the owner told me he growls when he get food, can you make a rabbit stop growling when approaching the food or should I just hand feed him instead so he learn to trust me.

    Just want to find out as much I can, if I get to buy him. I want to be prepared for him.

    Also will a neutered male and a not neutered male work sharing a space that it’s more than 100 sq ft and both have different cages. I’m going to neuter my male but he’s really weak so I’m waiting until he gets better before doing it.

    Or will the hormones of my male act up and hinder them to share the rooms when playing.
     
  4. Apr 16, 2018 #4

    Blue eyes

    Blue eyes

    Blue eyes

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    I'm guessing from what you are writing that you already have a neutered male and are considering getting this intact male? If you are wanting a rabbit to bond with your current male, then this is a risky way to try to find a bondmate. Males don't always bond. They should remain totally separate until both are neutered (6-8 weeks after the new one is neutered).

    You need to consider what it is you want. If your goal is to have two bonded bunnies, it's best to introduce your neutered male to other fixed rabbits to see which one shows potential to be compatible. By getting an intact rabbit (either male or female) there is a risk that the two will refuse to bond after being fixed. If you are ok with that, then fine.

    Bear in mind that when two rabbits do bond, they share everything and remain together always. They do not have separate cages.

    If you decide to take the risk and get this intact male, then they need to remain separate totally until 6-8 weeks after his neuter. That means no interaction whatsoever. That only risks a fight. There is no advantage to allowing them to interact before then. Only risk.

    The growling is likely due to hormones and may disappear after being fixed. It would, however, give me pause in wondering if he'll be difficult to bond. That growling, while it may be hormone-related, is also a sign of being territorial over his food. The more territorial a rabbit is, the less welcoming he may be to another rabbit.
     
  5. Apr 16, 2018 #5

    Hermelin

    Hermelin

    Hermelin

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    It’s mine buck that aren’t neutered yet, I’m buying a neutered male so he can go with my doe. Mine buck can’t get neutered yet, I’m waiting until he get a little stronger.

    But I’m not picking up my doe yet, because she’s still have a thick winter fur.

    I also thought the neutered buck might be territorial but he’s showing that he was afraid when the owner approached so it might just be that. The dog had no problem with going into the cage and walking close to the food, only the owner.
     
  6. Apr 16, 2018 #6

    Cookiemonster

    Cookiemonster

    Cookiemonster

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    hand feeding is a way to get trust from an animal... i would try that with his favorite treat... hopefully all goes well.. maybe try letting him sniff you through the cage where he knows he is safe..
     
  7. Apr 16, 2018 #7

    Blue eyes

    Blue eyes

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    Now I'm really confused. So you have an intact male who's health is on the mend. You plan to neuter him eventually. In the meantime, you are thinking of purchasing an already neutered male to bond with a doe (spayed yet?) even though the two rabbits have not even met. Again, this is not ideal and you have no way to know if the neutered male will get along with the doe. The doe you don't have yet either.

    But then you are also asking if the two males can share space. I'm not quite understanding what it is you are hoping to accomplish. It sounds like you will have 2 males and 1 female, but only plan to bond the female with the new male. But if the other male is anywhere near (in smelling distance) of the other two, it can cause all sorts of relationship issues even with the two (assuming they even bond).

    As I said earlier, it is the rabbits themselves that decide whether or not they will bond. You can pre-screen for potential compatibility if the two rabbits are both already fixed. Otherwise, it's just a shot in the dark.

    Either I'm not understanding what you are trying to accomplish or what you are trying to accomplish isn't thoroughly planned through. Having two males and one female seems to be asking for difficulty.
     
  8. Apr 16, 2018 #8

    Hermelin

    Hermelin

    Hermelin

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    Both are fixed the buck and the doe, while my buck is not fixed because of poor health.

    The doe it’s mine but I’m waiting for her to lose the winter fur before taking her home. It’s because I recently moved and she’s an outdoor rabbit so it’s still snow where she is. While I have spring/summer which make it too hot for her to move from winter to spring without getting used with the temperature slowly and I’ll have the problem of overheating for her.

    I have 3 cages, but only two rooms which are bunny proofed in the house. I have two indoor cages and one big outdoor hutch (100 sq ft) with a pen attached. So I can keep them separated without problem and let them get to know each other. I have neutral space which will be used to bond the rabbits.

    Even if they won’t bond, I have no problem taking care of them and they will still get a lot of care. I already know that the neutered buck and the doe dosen’t like cuddles and need a lot of space while my buck rather stay close to humans and love cuddles and being picked up but he dosen’t need a lot of space.

    So providing a home for the rabbits it’s no problem.
     
    Last edited: Apr 17, 2018

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