Rabbit just got spayed, need some advice

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yuumibunny

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Hello, my rabbit just came home from the vet after getting spayed today. They said she’s not really eating yet and they fed her critical care and to give them a call tomorrow morning to see how she’s doing.

are there any post surgery care I’m supposed to do or anything to watch out for?

so far she’s mostly curled up in a corner she has been sitting on her pee and poo and I try to wipe it off as she moves but she doesn’t really move much.

She seems so sad and look like she’s in a lot of pain, I covered her pen all over with soft fleece blanket to keep her cozy.
 

JBun

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Put a towel or something under her that will absorb and keep the urine drained away from her if the blankets isn't working.

After anesthesia they can get hypothermic. If her ears feel really cold, then she's too cold and you'll need to use a rabbit safe warm pack wrapped in a towel and set next to her, or under a towel or the blanket. I use a rice pack heated up in the microwave(check that it's not too hot). A hypothermic rabbit will struggle even more to recover, so it's essential that she is kept warm enough, but not overly hot.

Once she's warmed up, she'll be more inclined to want to eat. A cold rabbit won't usually want to eat. I've had the best luck getting them eating again by offering their usual leafy greens. They'll also help hydrate her. But if she isn't eating again by morning or not eating enough, the vet should give you some critical care feeding mix and syringes, and instructions on syringe feeding. She'll need to be fed every 4 hours until she starts eating again on her own.

The vet should have given you some meloxicam(NSAID) for pain, to give twice a day to her for the next few days. Good pain management is essential in a rabbits recovery. A rabbit in pain won't eat.


 

yuumibunny

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Put a towel or something under her that will absorb and keep the urine drained away from her if the blankets isn't working.

After anesthesia they can get hypothermic. If her ears feel really cold, then she's too cold and you'll need to use a rabbit safe warm pack wrapped in a towel and set next to her, or under a towel or the blanket. I use a rice pack heated up in the microwave(check that it's not too hot). A hypothermic rabbit will struggle even more to recover, so it's essential that she is kept warm enough, but not overly hot.

Once she's warmed up, she'll be more inclined to want to eat. A cold rabbit won't usually want to eat. I've had the best luck getting them eating again by offering their usual leafy greens. They'll also help hydrate her. But if she isn't eating again by morning or not eating enough, the vet should give you some critical care feeding mix and syringes, and instructions on syringe feeding. She'll need to be fed every 4 hours until she starts eating again on her own.

The vet should have given you some meloxicam(NSAID) for pain, to give twice a day to her for the next few days. Good pain management is essential in a rabbits recovery. A rabbit in pain won't eat.


thank you so much, I placed a heating pack near her, I noticed that her ears are colder than it normally is.

the vet game me some pain meds for her but they told me not to give it to her until tomorrow

She’s moving a lot more now compared to earlier so I think the heating pack is helping her, hopefully she starts eating as well.
 

Shmibunny

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They probably injected her with painkiller after the surgery and that's why you only need to start the painkiller tomorrow. As JBun said, keep her warm and comfortable on clean bedding/towels/blankets, feed and water her as needed, and give painkillers tomorrow. And just let her sleep and rest too.

It may be a good idea to write down her eating, pooping, peeing, and behaviour, and the care you're providing, to keep track of it (such as feeding her) more easily.
 

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