Rabbit biting rabbit while bonding

Help Support RabbitsOnline:

TheSketchyBunnies

Well-Known Member
Joined
Aug 27, 2019
Messages
154
Reaction score
124
Location
With My Rabbits... Where Else Would I Be?!?!
I am still in the bonding process with my (fixed) rabbits and my female rabbit really likes to bite my male rabbit and pull out his fur. Any advice? How do I stop this behavior?? She mainly does it when she humps him. If she starts to bite him I stop her.

Also my male rabbit likes to lightly bite/lick my female‘s eye lids. I stop it when I see it but does anyone know why does he does this?
 
Joined
Jun 2, 2020
Messages
22
Reaction score
8
Location
somewhere with my bunnies
Determine the triggering situation. There are numerous reasons why a rabbit might bite someone or something, but aggressive biting is usually in response to fearful or threatening situations. If you want to break your bunny of his aggressive biting behavior, you'll have to observe him and determine what situations set him off. Is your rabbit fearful of being picked up? Does your rabbit bite when you reach into his cage? Does your rabbit seem to get aggressive when you feed him or take away his food? Take note of the most common situation or situations in which your rabbit acts aggressively. Then think about why your rabbit might feel frightened or threatened in those situations. Calm an angry rabbit. If your rabbit is acting aggressively, you may be tempted to keep your distance. However, the best way to cope with this situation is to calm your rabbit and show him affection. This will teach your rabbit over time that you are not a threat, and that he does not have to fear you. Watch your own body language. Putting your hand in front of a rabbit's face may seem like a good way to introduce yourself (especially if you're used to dogs), but to a rabbit it could be perceived as a threatening gesture. A dominant rabbit will often force his face into a subordinate rabbit's face as an act of aggression. If you shove your hand towards your bunny's nose, he might think you're doing the same thing. Keep your hands behind your rabbit's head and far away from his nose. Any time your rabbit appears frightened near you, try gently stroking his head from above. Make sure you avoid the face (although the forehead may be okay), and talk to your rabbit in a calm and soothing voice. Some people find that holding an angry rabbit against your breastbone, with one hand around his ribs and the other hand supporting his behind, can calm the rabbit down and make him feel secure.
Lifting and securing an angry rabbit should be done with great caution, and is not recommended for everyone. If you do decide to try it, make sure the rabbit's feet and mouth are away from you so he can't hurt you.
 

TheSketchyBunnies

Well-Known Member
Joined
Aug 27, 2019
Messages
154
Reaction score
124
Location
With My Rabbits... Where Else Would I Be?!?!
@Mariam+Theo great idea! I will do that! @Rabbits R Cool thank you for the advice! Thankfully my rabbit doesn’t show any aggression towards me, but she does to my other rabbit. Of what I have observed over the last three days of bonding, my two rabbits are trying to settle who is going to be the alfa. I think that is what is triggering her biting.

Does anyone know the average time of rabbits determining the alfa??
 
Joined
Jun 2, 2020
Messages
22
Reaction score
8
Location
somewhere with my bunnies
@Mariam+Theo great idea! I will do that! @Rabbits R Cool thank you for the advice! Thankfully my rabbit doesn’t show any aggression towards me, but she does to my other rabbit. Of what I have observed over the last three days of bonding, my two rabbits are trying to settle who is going to be the alfa. I think that is what is triggering her biting.

Does anyone know the average time of rabbits determining the alfa??
Are both of your rabbits lionheads, because if they are different breeds I would probably put them in separate cages
 

BunBuns

New Member
Joined
Jun 1, 2020
Messages
1
Reaction score
2
Location
Australia
It really depends on the rabbits. If your bunnies are continually nipping each other when they are close try giving them lots of distractions and treats so that they associate each other with fun and good food! After a while, they should start to learn that the other rabbit isn't a threat and should start to see each other as a friend. Good Luck!
 

Mac189

Well-Known Member
Joined
Apr 8, 2020
Messages
384
Reaction score
419
Location
Montana
I think size difference is more of a barrier than breed. I've never had two of the same breed at once and it's never been a bonding issue. As for the eye licking, Foxwell sometimes does that when grooming Willa (I think she likes it a lot) and one of my past fosters, Lucky, did that ALL of the time to his friend, Chava. He even tried to lick my eyes. I am almost certain it's a very friendly behavior, although a little weird and very funny to watch.
 
Top