Rabbit ate a Golden Pothos

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BinkyLouie

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Hi, my Louie ate the SMALLEST piece of a plant.. he ate a small pinch of the leaf. Will he be okay or should I go to the vet? He really didn’t eat much but I’m not sure if it doesn’t matter and if he could still get poisoned. Should I just make sure he eats hay and drinks water? What do I do! I uploaded a picture of how much he ate off the leaf
 

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Watermelons

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Just keep pushing hay and offer a bowl of water.
Spike the water with something yummy if you have to, like a splash of apple juice. Pothos often causes GI upset. Vomiting diarrhea etc, and since rabbits cant vomit and have pretty sensitive GI systems already.... just keep an eye and ensure he keeps eating.
 

Apollo’s Slave

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He should be okay. It looks like a teeny tiny piece. According to a few other forums, it can potentially cause GI issues and mouth irritation, however, most of the time, rabbits can eat things that they shouldn't and show no symptoms.

As Watermelons said, hay and water are best. Keep topping the hay up and the water bowl filled. Keep an eye on him and he should be okay. Of course, if he starts to show any symptoms of stasis, or just generally not acting as he should be, have a vet check it out.
 

BinkyLouie

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Thank you guys. It’s been an hour or so since he ate it maybe even an hour and a half and he was running, jumping, and even went to drink water and hay. I even gave him a pinch of a green apple. After like 30min he went to his spot and he’s taking a nap right now. If he does get GI STATIS.. what should I do and how would I know if he has it?
 

Apollo’s Slave

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Some symptoms of stasis are refusing food, not eating, stomach pressing and not wanting to move. If you catch it early and quickly, you can give 1ml of simethicone/baby gas drops/colic relief every hour for three hours along with stomach massages.

Here is a video tutorial on how to do stomach massages:

If he doesn't eat for 6-8hours or the simethicone doesn't help, I would take him to the vet. But i'm sure he's okay :)
 

BinkyLouie

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Yeah, he’s eating right now lol Just fed him his daily veggies at 12. He’s MUNCHING! I’m sure he’s fine because when I called him he came out running. He knew it was time lol
 

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Catlyn

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Glad to hear he's doing okay!
What's going on with this collar though? Rabbits don't really need them and might even risk harming themselves with it, so i am curious why he has one on?
 

BinkyLouie

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Glad to hear he's doing okay!
What's going on with this collar though? Rabbits don't really need them and might even risk harming themselves with it, so i am curious why he has one on?
To reduce the risk of a hazard he has it on super loose. If it were tighter I would understand the concern but we bought it for him because it has a bell and the bell allows us to know where he is at all times. I’ve tried to take off the collar and bam I lose where he’s at. I take it off when he goes to sleep. There is need to be worried :) he also doesn’t seem to hate it. He’s had it on since he was 2 months of age and there hasn’t been any injuries. I check his neck to see if it’s irritated and nope :) he is a free roam rabbit so I wouldn’t want to reduce the amount of space he has by removing the collar. Thank you for asking !
 

Catlyn

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Just as a side note, bunnies can somethimes get stuck with collars even when they are loose, but i guess that a good rabbit-proofed house won't have that hazard. Your house seems to fit into that very well.
But why would his freeroaming space be limited by whether you know his location or not? I know by heart where my freeroamer Storm would flop around in the house without a chiming bell, or i could hear him zooming and making a ruckus, each bun has their own fave spots ( Lümi didn't lounge in the places that Storm did/does) and we just need to learn them, it seems. Nothing bad of it though. If you are aftaid of tripping on him, you could always try the zombie shuffle, and train him to come when called with the help of some treats (just say his name before you give him a treat, and gradually increase the distance, he should get it) :)
 

BinkyLouie

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Just as a side note, bunnies can somethimes get stuck with collars even when they are loose, but i guess that a good rabbit-proofed house won't have that hazard. Your house seems to fit into that very well.
But why would his freeroaming space be limited by whether you know his location or not? I know by heart where my freeroamer Storm would flop around in the house without a chiming bell, or i could hear him zooming and making a ruckus, each bun has their own fave spots ( Lümi didn't lounge in the places that Storm did/does) and we just need to learn them, it seems. Nothing bad of it though. If you are aftaid of tripping on him, you could always try the zombie shuffle, and train him to come when called with the help of some treats (just say his name before you give him a treat, and gradually increase the distance, he should get it) :)
I wanna keep my eyes on him at all times! With the collar like I said before allows me to know where he is at :) He loves to chew on things and he’s such a trouble maker. Last time I took off the collar for a few seconds and he already disappeared and I found him behind the fridge lol He loves to explore and he’s very curious. I would limit his free roaming so that he won’t get himself in bad situations is what I mean but that’s not what I want to do so that’s what the collar is for :) He binkies and all so as long as he is happy the collar is the least of my concern <3 Also yes! I have tripped over him before and my family has too so that’s also why we got it for him so that we don’t hurt him :) I understand that he can also get stuck with the collar being loose but I watch him very carefully and that doesn’t seem to be a concern! Before it was and we just tightened it a LITTLE bit and he was back to running without getting his hands stuck. I understand your concern but really he is great 👍🏽
 

Apollo’s Slave

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I'm glad he's eating and behaving normally :)

However, I do also agree with @Catlyn . I totally understand your reasons for feeling a need for the collar, but I personally, don't think bunnies really need it, especially when roaming in their homes and when outside, harnesses are safest. Our dogs don't wear their collars in the house and many indoor cat owners don't have their cats wear their collars inside either. I can imagine that your bunny roams around your whole house which is why he disappears sometimes, so again, I do understand why you have one.

What worries me is that there is a big risk that he can get stuck in the collar or choke. I just think (and this of course, is my opinion, I'm not trying to control what you choose to do) that if you're watching your bunny very carefully, he probably doesn't need one. imo the risks (potential injures, hair loss, strangulation, choking) greatly outway the reward (identification and knowing where she is). Most breakaway collars need at least 6lb of force to actually open, so if it does get caught, there is also the risk that it doesn't open because most bunnies aren't 6lb (my own bun is only about 5lb himself). If you have a quick read through one of the cat forums, there are loads of times that a cat's collar didn't break when needed or even got caught on their jaws. Just a precaution, i don't want to offend you or anything x
 

BinkyLouie

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I'm glad he's eating and behaving normally :)

However, I do also agree with @Catlyn . I totally understand your reasons for feeling a need for the collar, but I personally, don't think bunnies really need it, especially when roaming in their homes and when outside, harnesses are safest. Our dogs don't wear their collars in the house and many indoor cat owners don't have their cats wear their collars inside either. I can imagine that your bunny roams around your whole house which is why he disappears sometimes, so again, I do understand why you have one.

What worries me is that there is a big risk that he can get stuck in the collar or choke. I just think (and this of course, is my opinion, I'm not trying to control what you choose to do) that if you're watching your bunny very carefully, he probably doesn't need one. imo the risks (potential injures, hair loss, strangulation, choking) greatly outway the reward (identification and knowing where she is). Most breakaway collars need at least 6lb of force to actually open, so if it does get caught, there is also the risk that it doesn't open because most bunnies aren't 6lb (my own bun is only about 5lb himself). If you have a quick read through one of the cat forums, there are loads of times that a cat's collar didn't break when needed or even got caught on their jaws. Just a precaution, i don't want to offend you or anything x
No! It’s okay :) Don’t worry I’m not offended if anything this is educating me. Honestly, I plan to remove the collar when he is older. Right now ima just keep it on him because he’s crazy tbh. Sometimes he calm and sometimes he’s crazy and I prefer both! Haha, it’s funny really but I’ll think about the removal of the collar for now. I just want to add that I’m the only one who takes care of him. He is my responsibility and I have other things to do. If I ask for assistance i won’t get it because everyone else is doing something else. I understand both of your concern and I thank you 🙏🏽 We also have a cat and I have to watch her too so that she doesn’t try to kill him or smack him or anything. She’s such a grumpy cat and she also has a collar(flea collar with her name on it just in case she ever gets lost or snatched) so yeah.. It’s just a lot of things. I wish I could take off the collar but the chances are I probably won’t BUT I will consider it.
 

peanutdabunny

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Please dont use the collar, it can break the rabbits spine. It is bad for him. I know you have a cat, but the bell can be scaring the rabbit and you wouldnt even know. Collars are bad. I dont know what gave you the idea, but please refrane from using it
 

peanutdabunny

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Great pictures of everyone's rabbits!



Just FYI for anyone reading and wondering the same thing. Collars are actually quite dangerous to put on rabbits. Rabbits freak out very easily, and a collar getting snagged on something could either pose a choking hazard, cause spinal damage, or a panicked rabbit could even go into cardiac arrest. So please, do not put collars on rabbits.

(contains link to a story of a rabbit injured from wearing a collar)
.
 

peanutdabunny

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NO BELL COLLARS PLEASE. Putting any kind of collar on a rabbit is dangerous. If a collar were to snag on something a rabbit will panic to escape and could easily break a neck or back.
Having a noisy bell on a collar would surely be a constant irritation to a rabbit with its acute hearing. It would be so loud and constant -- I know it would drive me crazy.
 

peanutdabunny

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Sorry, but collars should not be kept on a rabbit all the time -- extremely risky. Here's what others have said:
Collars
collars on rabbits?
Is it okay for my rabbit to wear a collar?
I initially got a harness for my buns, but I felt that the rabbit harness, with just a strap around the neck and a strap around the back, still choked them when they pulled on the leash. I wanted something very comfortable for them to wear, that they could use when I took them out—they're microchipped, of course, but not a lot of people would even consider that a rabbit could be microchipped! So they have a Y front harness, so that any tension on the leash is distributed across their chest instead of on their neck. That way I have an extra safety measure in case they ever jump out of their stroller by way of leash (they never have but just to be safe) and also tags indicating that they are microchipped.

View attachment 37246

And PS: you have Bennie and Delilah, mine are Lahi and Delilah! But my Delilah is much bigger than her bunny hubby.

View attachment 37247 View attachment 37248

However, I did have a bad experience with a collar. Delilah is neurotic because of her neglectful first owner, and plucks Lahi's fur on his back, snatched him bald! So he wears shirts all day (after consulting with the vet to make sure it was okay) to protect his back. But trying to find clothes to fit a rabbit is SUPER HARD. I've had the most success with tank-top styles.

View attachment 37249

But I had a while where I was trying knit sweaters. I don't want them to be too constricting! But all too often the neck was too wide and he'd walk out the neck hole. So I started putting a collar under the cuff of the neck to keep it in place.

View attachment 37250

Well, one day, I was letting them out to play for several hours, and noticed nothing wrong... until it was time to go to bed, and I approached Lahi to discover that he'd managed to get his mouth around the collar, where his lower incisors had promptly trapped him like that. Now, it was a leather collar I'd chosen, quite thin, and he'd actually been millimetres from chewing through it and getting it off on his own... but if he'd panicked and started struggling he could have hurt his neck very badly. Their spines are just so flexible, and their necks are just so short! I haven't used a collar since.

The Y-front harnesses, Lahi and Delilah both used to gnaw at when I first started using them... so I would pull their neck fluff up through it, and now they can't reach the straps past their own neck blubber. Delilah's more than Lahi's, obviously, but now they don't bother with them at all.

But yeah, I'm in such a catch 22. Lahi is really not a fan of the clothes, he's learned to grudgingly tolerate them but I have to replace them every few months or so because he and Delilah tear them up. But if he doesn't wear them, Delilah plucks him down to the skin and then starts grabbing skin! And I can't separate them—Delilah's codependency and neediness are phenomenal, and Lahi will straight up stop eating if he's away from Delilah for more than 12 hours. He's 11 years old and I'm already constantly battling to keep weight on him, it's just not doable!

So, shirts.

View attachment 37251

He's got an orange one "Insert Snacks Here -->"
A black one "Will Do Tricks for Treats"
A pink one "100% Fabulous Around Here"
And a couple others.

Hilariously, this has been going on long enough that when I take the shirt off and let him run around without it, everyone comments that he looks naked! Not because of his bald spots, but because we're all simply too used to seeing him with clothes.
Cookiemonster, please don't consider a collar. They should not be put on a rabbit. Check the following threads from here on RO:
Collars
collars on rabbits?
I totally agree, it can cause irritation and if they get their collar caught on something high they could hang themselves. I know it’s not nice but you really should consider taking it off, he sounds really pampered! Which is great, but sometimes they don’t need fancy collars and bows, they just need love! If you want to use some sort of harness I use the H style harness, seen in the photo, but always supervise them when they have it on. I’ve heard that in Walmart or wherever you live, has a small H style harness, designed for kittens, that would be good for your rabbit. Only have it on for short periods of time with supervision, like I said. I don’t mean to offend you if you disagree, just my advice and I’m sure a lot of people would agree [emoji4]
 

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Just for explanation about why there is a problem with collars and rabbits - if a cat or dog gets tangled with one it could strangle itself, or be stuck, you may have hours to find and free it still alive. A rabbit on the other hand will try to escape in panic mode instantly, killing itself in the process with the power of those huge hind legs, or die later from shock or heart failure because it was used way over it'S 100% rating and got damaged.

That's why trapping wild rabbits with snares is the easiest method, cruel but effective. A lose collar imo actually increases the risk, I don't think they would even try to pull back when there is a free path in front of them, and something has grabbed them from right behind (only direction they cant see). The reaction to being caught is different to other animals. Last year I had to euthanize a kit that got stuck with a hind leg, when I found it the leg was almost completly torn off. They go into blind panic mode, tearing themselfs apart.

About the topic - my rabbits took test bites of everything toxic that grows here, even Lily Of The Valley (I don't have any of the realy bad plants), was never a problem.
 
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Catlyn

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I used store-bought "cat's best" compressed wood pellets, worked well but broke the bank for their size. Swapped to just any wood stove pellets, much cheaper, lasted longer too, but Lümi got irked by those so dad picked up some compressed straw pellets (what many over yonder call equine pine) that the vet reccommended to us. Took him so long that Lümi never got to try those, but they're doing wonders for Storm. They're not as dusty, absorb more and keep odours in. They last a bit longer too. Big bags, a tad bit expensivser than the wood stove ones, but worth it.
Got ours from some sort of warehouse-store building, not sure what they're called tho. Sorry i can't be of any more help with what's avaliable there.
 
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