Prolapsed rectum........urgent advice needed

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heaven33uk

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Hi everyone, I'm new here and was directed here by a lovely lady on another forum as she thought some may be able to help me.

I have 2 10 week old rabbits, both female and one has a prolapsed rectum. I took her to the vet on Friday and he diagnosed her with this as well as giving her a small operation to put a stich there to keep it in. The stitch was removed on Sunday but she prolapsed again yesterday (tuesday). I called the vet for advice as it had happened again so soon (he did advise that it could happen again) and he's now told me that she needs to be put to sleep.

I find this so hard to beleive as she is still very much her usual self and is eating, drinking and pooping ok and doesn't appear to be in any pain (tho she does keep licking the area alot)

I have called a another vet who deals with small animals and I'm hoping to see him on Friday but in the meantime I need to find out as much as I can about this as I really don't wanna lose her and my 12 yr old daughter would be heartbroken if we did.

Can anyone help?



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Bunnymom,K

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I am so sorry you and your bunny are going through this. Unfortunately a prolapsed rectum is a painful condition (keep in mind that bunnies are good at hiding pain) and if suturing it back in place does not work there usually isn't a lot that can be done. Sometimes a second procedure will hold. You could certainly have the other vet redo the procedure. If it prolapses again though, euthanasia is probably the best thing you can do for your sweet bunny. Best of luck, please let us know what happens.
 

Elf Mommy

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It's the first I've heard of the condition, but I hope you can get the procedure redone, or seek another opinion. Hopefully someone who has gone through this with their rabbits will come in to respond soon.
 

Pipp

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Did the vet prescribe steroids and antibiotics? And plenty of fluids? Butt baths in cool water with Epson salts?

I think the steroids will help but I think often one they're stopped the condition reoccurs.

I'd try the operation again, but it may be a genetic and non-fixable issue. :( I'll see if I can find any other instances.

So sorry you're going through this.


sas :pray:
 

Pipp

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I think its painful while it's protruding, but its not hard to put it back in on your own. The dangers are infection, necrosis, etc. You can't let it dry out or get dirty and infected. There is a danger that cecals and/or poops can be trapped in the area leading to problems as well.

I believe you can train the muscle to keep it in place. Vets I know will somehow 'glue' it in place as well as add the stitches.

The main issue is why is it prolapsing? At that age, its less likely to be diet or other health issues and more likely to be genetic.

I'd definitely get a second opinion. Keeping it clean, moist and preferably inside the body will manage it, but obviously it's not all that workable to keep it up.

With an adult rabbit, eliminating the cause and doing some muscle training is possible -- with sub-q fluids you can buy some time to allow it to heal. I'm not sure about steroids at that age, but ask about that as well.

Try again with the fluids and whatever diet the vet says will put the least strain on the area. I'd guess just canned pumpkin, but I don't know about that.

I wouldn't give up this quickly.


sas :pray:
 

NorthernAutumn

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Multiple chinchilla message boards have suggested that reinsertion is best done with sterile gauze/cotton ball, moistened with saline solution.
Those boards also indicated that a vet had put in this so-called "purse stitch" 3 times in a guineapig before success.
 
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I think that I'll send this thread to Pamnock whoI believe has dealt with this ; I have not seen it in a rabbit but know it occurs in all species of animals ,,

Iwould think that an exotics vet or rabbit specialized vet would be able to attempt treatment without need to PTS now :(
 

heaven33uk

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Thanks so much everyone for your quick replies. I hadn't realised that rabbits can hide their pain and feel pretty guilty now for assuming she was ok. I have been keeping the area clean and moist, I bathe it several times a day with cooled/warm boiled salty water. I have tried to get it back inside her myself but that's when she starts to struggle and I thought I was hurting her so I stopped trying.
At the moment I can't afford to spend alot of money on vets fees ( I know that sounds awful) but if I know a treatment will work then I'm willing to leave myself broke to do it.
It's really seeming like I have to do something, one way or the other pretty quickly now so if anyone knows another bunny mummy who's had the same problem I'd really appreciate their advice too.

Thanks so much to all replies........I really appreciate your fast responses.

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pamnock

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The prolapse may worsen with age, although cases due to diarrhea often spontaneously heal.Often the prolapse will occur again when stitches are removed, so this doesn't appear to be a very effective option. Surgery to permanently correct the prolapse (attaching the bowel to the abdominal wall or inserting a wire in the sphincter are more involved and more expensive, but these are some options you can discuss with the vet if the prolapse worsens.



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tonyshuman

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I too worry that it is caused by watery stool--that might make her push too hard and cause the prolapse to reoccur. It should be surgically repaired again, perhaps in a different way. I don't know much about this procedure in particular, sorry.

I do know that it doesn't make sense to prescribe antibiotics at the same time as steroids. I wouldn't prescribe steroids to her at all for this condition. Steroids should be used with caution in rabbits because they weaken the immune system, which is dangerous in rabbits because they have so many pathogens living in them sub-clinically. Also, antibiotics augment the immune system to help it fight infection. If you knock the immune system down with steroids, the antibiotics won't work. It would be best to put a hemorrhoid cream on the prolapse itself to reduce swelling, and use a non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug like Metacam instead of steroids to bring the swelling and inflammation down.
 

heaven33uk

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Thanks everyone, I'm really appreciating all these replies and trying alot of the things I'm finding through forums and the net.

R.E the hemroid cream........is there a special cream for bunnies or do I just use the 'human' stuff. I seen this one mentioned alot but wasn't sure of the exact cream to use.
 

Pipp

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heaven33uk wrote:
Thanks everyone, I'm really appreciating all these replies and trying alot of the things I'm finding through forums and the net.

R.E the hemroid cream........is there a special cream for bunnies or do I just use the 'human' stuff. I seen this one mentioned alot but wasn't sure of the exact cream to use.

You really need to consult a vet for these things. You're looking at an ointment designed for external use being very likely ingested orally, and that has to be approached with the utmost caution.

I'd place a call to the vet you already saw and try and get some phone advise. Seeing as you've already paid out for an unsuccessful treatment, they should be willing to offer this kind of advise for no further charge.

That said, given that rabbits have a very delicate digestive track, I'd be far more comfortable with another visit to a second rabbit-savvy vet for a second opinion.


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tonyshuman

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Hemmerhoid creme for people has been used by breeders for a long time for urine scald and sore hocks. Something like Preparation-H is usually recommended. I haven't used it myself, but I have read about it. Usually they contain salicylic acid or phenylephrine along with many oils. Phenylephrine is used orally as a decongestant as well. As long as you don't gob it on there in a thick coating, or apply it more than 1-2 times a day, it should be ok and I don't think she'd ingest enough to cause problems. Perhaps Pam has experience with Preparation-H, for hutch burn or sore hocks?
 

Pipp

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tonyshuman wrote:
Hemmerhoid creme for people has been used by breeders for a long time for urine scald and sore hocks. Something like Preparation-H is usually recommended. I haven't used it myself, but I have read about it. Usually they contain salicylic acid or phenylephrine along with many oils. Phenylephrine is used orally as a decongestant as well. As long as you don't gob it on there in a thick coating, or apply it more than 1-2 times a day, it should be ok and I don't think she'd ingest enough to cause problems. Perhaps Pam has experience with Preparation-H, for hutch burn or sore hocks?

Good points. But is any brand different or unsafer than any other? Is a product like Bag Balm, designed to be safe for nursing calfs, as effective?


sas :?
 

tonyshuman

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That may be better, I hadn't thought about that. I just thought a hemmoroid cream would be good because it's designed to bring down the swelling as well as heal chapped skin. Bag balm is more likely to be safe to ingest, you're right Pipp.
 

tonyshuman

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I use something called Udderly Smooth, which was first made for cow udders but is good for hands too. They sell it at grocery and drug stores here. Anything that's meant for cow udders, to keep them from getting cracked, would be similar. I think prep H would be ok as well, because it's an old breeder's remedy.
 

heaven33uk

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Then I think I'm gonna go with the Prep H......thanks for the tip. I'm giving it until Monday to see if I can help Oreo with this and if I can't........well, I'm gonna do whatever the vet recommends as I don't wanna drag this out for her if she's in pain just because I'm too selfish to let her go :(
 
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I don't know if prep H is safe for a rabbit to ingest so just put on a small amount if you are going to use it and watch to se if he is going to clean it off with his mouth...
i guess I know that zinc oxide in diaper rash cream is not safe but i am unsure about the ingredients in prep H
 

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