Potential vet costs?

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Okay so I’ve been wanting a bunny for the past half year now, and I’ve done a crap ton of research so the bunny can live a long and safe life. I’ve finally convinced my parents to let me adopt a bunny and I should be able to do that by Christmas or somewhere during December. And I’ve finally been hit with the topic of vet bills. Please explain to me how much it generally cost to actually maintain a rabbits health in case of emergencies. I know like checkups and stuff can cost around 200 dollars a year but for emergencies. Do you guys have like some kind of trust fund? Or is there some kind of bunny insurance out there. I’ve tried researching but unfortunately all I could see were insurances for dogs and cats.

any kind of help will be appreciated, Thank you!
 

CrazyChickenGirl

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I have $200 set aside for emergencies for my bun, and I add some to it every once in a while.
 

John Wick

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The costs of a rabbit-experienced vet will vary depending on where you are and on the type of emergency. I will add that vet appointments that happen to assess whether something is or is not an emergency would likely cost more than $200 in itself-- Many of the tests required to assess what exactly is going on, such as an X-ray or tests involving pee/poop will often cost more than $50-100, in addition to the "general exam" charge typically included (i.e. regular check-up charge).

I can give a personal example. My rabbit broke a single finger on a front paw in March actually. As of today, I have spent $1,142 on vet expenses:

$510 - booking an "emergency" appointment slot with x-rays and medications required​
$305 - follow-up appointment with x-rays required​
$75 - check-in appointment​
$32 - medication refill​
$220 - follow-up due to recovery complications; x-rays and medication required​
... and I have a follow-up this week which will also require x-rays.

I think what's more important having your parents agree to a number is getting their willingness to help with the rabbit, including more heavy costs. If they are not willing, I think it's worthwhile to reflect if now is the best time to get a rabbit. A lot of rabbit care, which can span over 10 years depending on a rabbit's age at adoption, includes learning on the fly and adapting to what happens. If there is an unwillingness to support you and the rabbit when things are not as "expected" (which tends to happen regardless of how much research we do, haha), that's a hurdle to be addressed now, rather than later.
 

Blue eyes

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I would also suggest beginning a fund for vet costs. Have an amount you set aside each month (or week) to reserve for when it is needed. If you aren't getting your rabbit til the end of the year, you can already get a head start.

People vary on their preferences for vet checks. I've had rabbits since the late 1980s and only took a rabbit to a vet if it was sick. That was only a few times over many rabbits. I didn't take them for regular check ups, but that's me. I know what signs to watch out for.

You may want to take a look here (from my website) for what to have in a first-aid kit:

and here, for what signs to watch out for:

 
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Thank y
I would also suggest beginning a fund for vet costs. Have an amount you set aside each month (or week) to reserve for when it is needed. If you aren't getting your rabbit til the end of the year, you can already get a head start.

People vary on their preferences for vet checks. I've had rabbits since the late 1980s and only took a rabbit to a vet if it was sick. That was only a few times over many rabbits. I didn't take them for regular check ups, but that's me. I know what signs to watch out for.

You may want to take a look here (from my website) for what to have in a first-aid kit:

and here, for what signs to watch out for:

Thank you soo much!
 
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The costs of a rabbit-experienced vet will vary depending on where you are and on the type of emergency. I will add that vet appointments that happen to assess whether something is or is not an emergency would likely cost more than $200 in itself-- Many of the tests required to assess what exactly is going on, such as an X-ray or tests involving pee/poop will often cost more than $50-100, in addition to the "general exam" charge typically included (i.e. regular check-up charge).

I can give a personal example. My rabbit broke a single finger on a front paw in March actually. As of today, I have spent $1,142 on vet expenses:

$510 - booking an "emergency" appointment slot with x-rays and medications required​
$305 - follow-up appointment with x-rays required​
$75 - check-in appointment​
$32 - medication refill​
$220 - follow-up due to recovery complications; x-rays and medication required​
... and I have a follow-up this week which will also require x-rays.

I think what's more important having your parents agree to a number is getting their willingness to help with the rabbit, including more heavy costs. If they are not willing, I think it's worthwhile to reflect if now is the best time to get a rabbit. A lot of rabbit care, which can span over 10 years depending on a rabbit's age at adoption, includes learning on the fly and adapting to what happens. If there is an unwillingness to support you and the rabbit when things are not as "expected" (which tends to happen regardless of how much research we do, haha), that's a hurdle to be addressed now, rather than later.
Thanks, I have been thinking about whether getting a bunny now is the best idea too. My mom is about to have a kid in like September, I also don’t want to stress her since she’ll be the one driving me to the vet. I’m now rethinking on the time that I’ll get the bunny. 9/10 chance that it’s not this year. A trust fund is a good idea but I’ll probably not have saved enough money by the end of this year. I’ve planned that out but it’s definitely not going to be enough. So late next year seems like the best time for be to get the bunny. I’ll be 15 which means a job would definitely be available for me to get so more money would be available. I could also broading my knowledge again over that time period. Thanks again!
 

samoth

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My personal experiences with a pair of adopted house rabbits in Michigan:

I pay just under $200/year for an annual checkup for two rabbits.

Bloodwork is $150, and I've only had it done twice.

My experience with emergency care has been on the more expensive side: treatment for stasis due to urinary issues causing bladder sludge was over $1k for the initial visit (including imaging), then another $400 for follow-up care for the next several weeks (100 mL subq water injections & medications).

Also note that some rabbit medical issues can be prevented. My doe had molar spurs when I adopted her at 3.5 years of age. I don't think she had a good hay-rich diet earlier in life, and had no interest in it after I acquired her. Being familiar with the high costs (and trauma!) involved with rabbit dental care, I experimented a lot with her diet to find a way to get her to eat hay. The solution in my case was clover and small mixtures of alfalfa in orchard hay. It's not been good for her weight, but she hasn't had any dental issues at all for the past 5 years (and the molar spurs were gone by the second vet checkup).
 

Sweet Potato rabbit

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My bun recently had bloat and was at the early stage of stasis. His emergency vet trip cost about $310, including x-ray but excluding critical care and bene-bac plus because I had both at home. There’s also the standby supplies which was put to use before we could get to the vet - simethicone and Pedialyte. So I estimate the episode cost about $400? If there had been a delay in bringing him to the vet and bloodwork etc is needed, there’s a chance the amount would be closer to $1000.

On too of emergency trips, annual checks are at $127 per visit, and neutering is $250.

Yes there’s rabbit insurance. You can ask Nationwide Pet Insurance for a quote although I’m not sure about the coverage and quality of service.
 

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