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Eve84

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Will do thanks blue eyes.

I put a few wooden planks down for them so their little bum can be a bit warmer rather than sitting on the concrete.
I bet you are right and they will love it and I will have sleepless nights [emoji23]
The kids wanted to sleep out there with the rabbits and it was hard to get them away from that idea until summer time [emoji23]
Eve
 

Eve84

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IMG_5955.jpg


That’s what it looked like this morning [emoji849][emoji36] so my temporary solution didn’t work out.... so bunny’s are back in their little hutch and I need to think about something else until the frames will be ready.
 

Mariam+Theo

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I don't see a reason why you need the plastic covering unless it is windy/rainy. But even then, if it is windy/rainy they can go into their hutch to warm up. They might actually like the fresh air that comes through the welded wire. Whenever I open the door to the shed Theo loves all the fresh air that rushes in.
 

Eve84

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Hi Theo,
Thanks for your reply.
That was my thought too at the beginning but the breeder told us, that dwarf rabbits aren’t dwarf rabbits anymore. They are basically not tough enough anymore to stay outside specially some breeds like “teddy or the ones with angora wool”. And that you should protect all kind of breeds agains rain as they become wet and ill and also wind specially draft wind.

And that’s the reason why we want to have it weather proof during the winter and spring time and once it’s summer and warm to be able to take away the protection and have the ability to have the wire free for the slight warm wind breeze coming through.

We decided to go for something which is similar to plexiglas but much cheaper and less see through sadly.
Eve
 

Eve84

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Hi [emoji112]
We finally finished the walk in enclosure for our three bunny’s.

We have taken a cheaper option for now as the Plexiglas would have been to expensive. A friend wanted to have a look to get it cheaper but as everything is getting closed due to Corona and we wanted to stay away from people we used that as a quick solution which might not be a permanent solution as it annoys us that it isn’t very see through. But it also has plus points with not being see through in terms of cats etc. not being able to shock them and the cats can’t even see them from the outside.

Here are a few pictures!

Stay healthy!!!
Eve IMG_3442.jpgIMG_3443.jpgIMG_3444.jpgIMG_3445.jpgIMG_3447.jpgIMG_6139.jpg
 

Eve84

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And the new - non see through windows are removable- depend on the weather!
 

thevanguard6

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Blue eyes

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That looks like it worked out really well. Perhaps a small/cheap throw rug to give them a soft surface to sit on? Not sure if you're interested, but there are some nifty bunny tips here:
A feature that would probably fit in your groovy enclosure area: http://www.blitter.com/~nebulous/otherworld/Rabbit platforms 01C.pdf

And general info:
http://www.blitter.com/~nebulous/otherworld/RabbitCareGuide.pdf
A rug or mat would be a good idea!

One of the links has some questionable advice that contradicts experience and the House Rabbit Society. It states that lettuce is "not so good" and that a rabbit shouldn't get too many fresh veggies. Aside from iceberg lettuce, the other (dark green) lettuces (romaine, red-leaf, green leaf, spring mixes, etc) are perfectly fine and safe to feed a rabbit (provided these, like any new food, are slowly introduced).

It is recommended that 2-4 cups of greens be fed daily and that is what many here on RO feed. Those greens may include the lettuces or spring mixes or basil, cilantro, mint, oregano, thyme, dill, tops of carrots. Some should not be fed daily as they are high in oxolates or in calcium-- like parsley, mustard greens, kale, broccoli.

Fruit, on the other hand, should be severely limited to 1-2 tbsp per day max. This would include high sugar carrots too.

Here is an article about those greens:
http://rabbit.org/natural-nutrition-part-ii-pellets-and-veggies-2/
 

Eve84

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My app suddenly doesn’t work anymore :0( does anybody experience the same or know how to help?
Thanks
Eve
 

Eve84

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It’s a good idea with the rug but I don’t want to place something down other that wood for now as I want to get them toilet trained first.

They are already litter/ toilet trained in their little hutch but not in the big enclosure just yet.

a few little things still need to be improved etc. But everything is on hold for now due to this Corona virus :0(.

here are a few pictures

eve
 

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Eve84

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So does it mean they deleted it and it’s no longer and never available? :0(((
 

Eve84

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Thanks for the links Blue eyes I will read them at a later time when I can read them on my husbands laptop. also I still didn’t add my pictures on the outdoor thread.
 

thevanguard6

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One of the links has some questionable advice that contradicts experience and the House Rabbit Society. It states that lettuce is "not so good" and that a rabbit shouldn't get too many fresh veggies. Aside from iceberg lettuce, the other (dark green) lettuces (romaine, red-leaf, green leaf, spring mixes, etc) are perfectly fine and safe to feed a rabbit (provided these, like any new food, are slowly introduced).
Fresh veggies seem to be hit and miss. Some rabbits are okay with them and others are not. I find that many older rabbits start to have gut issues when getting too many fresh veggies. Studying the eating habits of hares is what led to my adoption of dried foods (dried parsley, dried apple slices, dried carrot tops, etc...). Decades later, it's proven to work very well for multiple rabbits. So feel free to try fresh veggies in moderation, but if your bunny's droppings soften up, I'd recommend the hay and dried fruit and veggies diet. Again, 80% of your rabbit's diet should be timothy hay (ideally).
 

Blue eyes

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Fresh veggies should not be hit or miss IF they are being introduced properly. Slow introductions of one type at a time allows a rabbit's gut time to respond appropriately to the nutritious greens. Usually a rabbit won't have issues unless it is offered too much or too soon. It could also be that just one particular green doesn't sit well with a particular rabbit. But that is easily discovered if greens are introduced properly.

As far as following the eating habits of hares, that seems a bit off given that hares and rabbits are 2 different species. There are many differences between hares and rabbits, not the least of which is their diet in the wild. Hares tend to eat twigs and branches (especially in winter), while rabbits eat soft greens like grasses and other fresh green foliage. This lends credence to the recommendation to have generous fresh greens as part of a rabbit's daily diet.

That said, there are plenty of hardy individual rabbits that will thrive on just about any diet. I knew of a rabbit that was fed nothing but dry dog food for its first 5 years -- no hay, no pellets. Other occasional rabbits are just the opposite and even have trouble digesting pellets. So anecdotal evidence aside, the recommendations to feed 2-4 cups of daily fresh greens should not be classified, in my opinion, as "not so good" but should rather be encouraged.
 
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