New rabbit owner, in need of advice

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Hi I recently got a pair of bunnies. And I have some questions.
My rabbits live in a spacious cage situated near a large glass sliding door. When the weather is warm and sunny, we usually leave the door open to let the breeze and fresh air in. Is that good for my rabbits, or is it too drafty?
Another issue I found was that our piano is in the same room as the cage, and either I'm a horrible piano player or they just dislike the loud sounds, because they crawl into their hidey hole and refuse to come out when somebody is playing the piano. Should I move the cage to another room, or will they get used to the noise?
Another question I have is about bedding for their cage. I read online that I can use hay or straw for bedding, but it seems rather expensive to change and replace, so I put down a fleece blanket. Was this a bad choice? They're still getting used to using a litter box, and occasionally soil the blanket. They also nibble on it sometimes, and I'm worried that it will be bad for their health. Not putting anything down on the bottom of the cage seems wrong too. Should I look into getting them a pad or mat?
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Oceanie

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Are they allowed out of the cage to free roam? Rabbits need at least 3-4 hours of free roam time a day so they don't develop mental or physical health problems, such as obesity.
 
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Blue eyes

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While litter training, there should be nothing soft in the rest of the cage-- no blankets, no bedding.
Could you show a further away shot of your cage? Also, what are the ages of your rabbits?

Rabbits may or may not litter train when they are very young. When hormones kick in, they may not train either. They train themselves once they are fixed.

For now, the only soft bedding should be in the litter box. It should be topped with hay. It also appears from the first photo that there are colorful bits in their food? Or is it just some loose bedding?? The healthiest pellets are plain and have no colorful add-ins.

You might want to get a better overview of a proper liter box set up and how to use those store bought cages at the following pages of my website:
 

Mariam+Theo

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When you get them spayed and neutered they will forget the bond they had and you will be back to square one. Are they both females, or both males? If you have one female and one male, the female might already be pregnant. You will need to separate them ASAP. If you have two males there is a low chance that they will bond.
 

Blue eyes

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They are each 3 months old. What will happen if they bond before we get them spayed and neutered?View attachment 48359
Yikes! I'd also be concerned that she may be pregnant already. I know they look adorable together right now but they must be separated immediately or, if she isn't already pregnant, she will be soon.

Baby rabbits almost always get along and appear bonded. Once hormones are in full swing, they may fight. But the bigger concern with male/female is her getting pregnant. So to answer your question, baby bonds never count as true bonds. Hormones (or pregnancy) change all that. Once they are both fixed and healed, they can be re-introduced to form an actual bond.
 

Blue eyes

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As for the litter training efforts, their current age is working against them. They are coming into hormones which makes them less consistent. Even younger babies that litter train will often forget their litter habits with the onset of hormones.

Once fixed, they typically litter train themselves.
 
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When you get them spayed and neutered they will forget the bond they had and you will be back to square one. Are they both females, or both males? If you have one female and one male, the female might already be pregnant. You will need to separate them ASAP. If you have two males there is a low chance that they will bond.
Is there a way to tell if the female is pregnant? And if she's already pregnant is it still possible to spay and neutered??
 
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Are they allowed out of the cage to free roam? Rabbits need at least 3-4 hours of free roam time a day so they don't develop mental or physical health problems, such as obesity.
Yes I let them out each day so I can clean the poop from the cage, but they don't like being outside of their cage and just hop back in once I take them out. Why are they doing this and how can I help them??
 
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They like to eat apples in small bits. I know the sugar is bad for them, so I don't give them more than 2 small cubes every week. They seem tempted to eat more after I feed them every time and jump at the bars of the cage after I feed them for the next hour. What should I do?
 

Oceanie

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They like to eat apples in small bits. I know the sugar is bad for them, so I don't give them more than 2 small cubes every week. They seem tempted to eat more after I feed them every time and jump at the bars of the cage after I feed them for the next hour. What should I do?
Do they get time to free-roam everyday? It may not only be the treats they want, but simply wanting to get out and play. Sorry, I've asked this twice...
 

Jurisfiction

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Hi I recently got a pair of bunnies. And I have some questions.

Another issue I found was that our piano is in the same room as the cage, and either I'm a horrible piano player or they just dislike the loud sounds, because they crawl into their hidey hole and refuse to come out when somebody is playing the piano. Should I move the cage to another room, or will they get used to the noise?

Hah! My piano is in the same room as my rabbit and Marlow likes to run around my feet when I play faster songs. Slower parts he just sits. If I’m working on a measure and making mistakes, he hides. Cracks me up. Like he’s an expert, right?
When I played with the windows open in the spring, the birds outside chirped very loudly- we’re they drowning out the noise or singing along?

I bet your rabbits will get used to your playing!
 

Blue eyes

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First things first. You need a second cage and need to separate the male from the female - ASAP.

I'd suggest getting an ex-pen or two. They are so handy for any bun owner. You can use one of them as a temporary cage in the meantime (for one of the rabbits). Then you can use another one for their exercise time.

Any ex-pen should be a minimum of 30" in height.

Check the following site for housing info and an example of an "ex-pen cage."

Rabbits don't like to be forced out of their home (cage). That is why they aren't liking it when you take them out. As @Freedom said, the door should be left open and then he or she can come out when they feel ready. For starters, have an ex-pen around the cage to create a limited space. They feel safer when their space is limited at first. As they grow in confidence, their roaming area can be expanded gradually. The next link explains some of this (and how best to get them in and out of their cage -- soon-to-be cageS.
Bonding With Your Bunny
 

Mariam+Theo

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Is there a way to tell if the female is pregnant? And if she's already pregnant is it still possible to spay and neutered??
You will need to separate them, and then you can palpatate her tummy and see if you feel any babies. You can also get the vet to check and see if she is pregnant. If you don't want the babies, the vet can take them out and spay her. If she is pregnant feed her Alfalfa hay, you can keep her on the same pellets. Keep her water bowl full at all times! Pregnant rabbits drink a lot of water. Dandelion will also help with milk production, so feed her lots of dandelion. Keep her in a comfy, relaxed environment; you can cover her cage with a blanket when you think the babies might be coming. Trim her nails 10 days before the babies are due to keep her from accidentally hurting them. I would also use a nail filer to soften the edges after you cut them.
-You will need to add a nesting box to her cage.
*Spaying: Once her babies reach 2 months old, and all of them have been rehomed, you can spay her. After the surgery, keep her separate from all rabbits for at least 1 month.
 
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You will need to separate them, and then you can palpatate her tummy and see if you feel any babies. You can also get the vet to check and see if she is pregnant. If you don't want the babies, the vet can take them out and spay her. If she is pregnant feed her Alfalfa hay, you can keep her on the same pellets. Keep her water bowl full at all times! Pregnant rabbits drink a lot of water. Dandelion will also help with milk production, so feed her lots of dandelion. Keep her in a comfy, relaxed environment; you can cover her cage with a blanket when you think the babies might be coming. Trim her nails 10 days before the babies are due to keep her from accidentally hurting them. I would also use a nail filer to soften the edges after you cut them.
-You will need to add a nesting box to her cage.
*Spaying: Once her babies reach 2 months old, and all of them have been rehomed, you can spay her. After the surgery, keep her separate from all rabbits for at least 1 month.
Thanks for the advice. I will try to check and see if she is pregnant.
 
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You will need to separate them, and then you can palpatate her tummy and see if you feel any babies. You can also get the vet to check and see if she is pregnant. If you don't want the babies, the vet can take them out and spay her. If she is pregnant feed her Alfalfa hay, you can keep her on the same pellets. Keep her water bowl full at all times! Pregnant rabbits drink a lot of water. Dandelion will also help with milk production, so feed her lots of dandelion. Keep her in a comfy, relaxed environment; you can cover her cage with a blanket when you think the babies might be coming. Trim her nails 10 days before the babies are due to keep her from accidentally hurting them. I would also use a nail filer to soften the edges after you cut them.
-You will need to add a nesting box to her cage.
*Spaying: Once her babies reach 2 months old, and all of them have been rehomed, you can spay her. After the surgery, keep her separate from all rabbits for at least 1 month.
I don't know how to trim nails and every time I try to touch her feet she jumps away. What can I do?
 
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