New rabbit owner, help!

Discussion in 'Bunny Blogs' started by Mocha-Opal, Mar 5, 2019.

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  1. Mar 5, 2019 #1

    Mocha-Opal

    Mocha-Opal

    Mocha-Opal

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    Hello there! I'm new to this whole rabbit thing, I've done other research I just want a second opinion before I get all the supplies.

    My bunbun is a Mini Lop ,Idk what brush or litter box to get her .Also ,what bedding and safe treats for her.

    She has an Opal coat pattern. Sadly I forgot to take more pictures of her XD

    Haven't brought her home yet tho

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  2. Mar 5, 2019 #2

    jess24rose

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    Paper based litter or wood pellets no cat litter or wood shavings. For bedding fleece is good for preventing sore hocks. and you can give her apple or banana as a treat but not that much only a little bit a day.
     
  3. Mar 5, 2019 #3

    Augustus&HazelGrace

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    For a brush, I use a cat brush from the dollar general. A cheap cat litter box from the same store will suffice the one that she has now is terrible wayyyyy too small and I hope you are buying a much bigger cage or hutch preferably an x-pen store bought cages are wayy too small for bunnies, make sure she would be able to stretch all the way out in it, as for litter a lot of people here use wood pellets from the local farm store or hardware store sold for horses. Never use Pine or cedar litter or bedding EVER. And if you need feeding guidelines we can help too, there is a lot that goes into it more than what you think. Just in case you don't know already this is my biggest rule although there are many other things that they cannot have and a certain way you should introduce greens, NEVER EVER feed ICEBERG lettuce EVER it is toxic to them. Romaine is best or other dark leaf lettuces. Also, another thing rabbits need as much hay a day as big as they are, the best to feed is Timothy but grass hays are just as good, just not alfalfa, there are only certain reasons why a bun would need alfalfa hay. As for treats, the store-bought stuff is CRAP a small bit of apple, banana, or a baby carrot is good once or twice a week.
     
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  4. Mar 5, 2019 #4

    jess24rose

    jess24rose

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    yes i agree I think you covered much more than I did lol
     
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  5. Mar 5, 2019 #5

    Augustus&HazelGrace

    Augustus&HazelGrace

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    Also, she should be able to stand all the way up in her cage or whatever you decide to get her and still have headroom along with being able to stretch out. She should also be able to stretch all the way out in her litterbox, this is why we recommend an x-pen.
     
  6. Mar 5, 2019 #6

    jess24rose

    jess24rose

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    It should be at least 2 feet by 4 feet but that depends the size of your bunny
     
  7. Mar 5, 2019 #7

    Alyssa and Bugs♡

    Alyssa and Bugs♡

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    I also use a brush from the dollar store. See attached video for instructions on how to make your brush work better. This is what I did. I use an x pen for my rabbits cage, and I love it. If I need to bring it to another room, I can just fold it up easily. Pine pellets are actually safe to use in a litter box. It's the shavings that aren't. Cedar isn't safe at all. In the actual cage, you can use blankets. It's good on their hocks and it looks nice. Good luck!
     
  8. Mar 5, 2019 #8

    Alyssa and Bugs♡

    Alyssa and Bugs♡

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    Here is the link. I forgot to attach it earlier.
     
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  9. Mar 5, 2019 #9

    jess24rose

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    I love lennon the bunny
     
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  10. Mar 5, 2019 #10

    Theo

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    Welcome to the forum!
    I use pine wood pellets for his litter and a small cat litter box. I use straw and a blanket for his bedding. I got a rabbit grooming kit that works well for grooming. Just make sure that your rabbit has unlimited timothy hay.
     
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  11. Mar 6, 2019 #11

    Blue eyes

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    Here's a list (with photos) of what to be sure to have in order to set up a cage and what first-aid supplies and what cleaning supplies to have on hand as well.

    Iceberg isn't toxic. It just lacks any nutrition. [It could give a young baby rabbit some serious diarrhea -- but so can any green if they aren't used to it.] It just isn't advised to offer it to older rabbits because of it's lack of nutritional value.
     
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  12. Mar 6, 2019 #12

    VioletRose

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    Her cage looks small. The bigger the better, bigger than even the three hops either way recommended for a truly comfortable happy bunny. Toys are also a good idea, natural fibres like grass toys, grass mats to chew, willow balls etc. She will need at the very minimum 4-5 hours outside of cage free run time as well. 1/4 cup of pellets daily or less only, no treats with sugar, yoghurt, fruit, seeds, or grains, in fact just stick to the very occassional blue berry, low gi fruit, small bit of apple or tiny occasional bit of banana or carrot (very high in sugars which is terrible for gut health long term). 2-3 cups of different greens daily such as dark leaf lettuces, herbs like basil, cilantro, parsley (not too often as apparently high in calcium), Kale (also only few times a week), fresh grass without pesticide or from the verge of the road where it may have been sprayed, dandelion flowers and greens, also don't get from verge of road or anywhere you think could have been sprayed by the council etc. It is important to provide a variety of different greens for health and for interest. Hay is the most important food item and 70-80% of total diet should be good quality hay. It needs to be stored so that it doesn't get mouldy but also remains fresh, I keep mine in large plastic lidded containers and check for mould regularly, depends on how humid your area is and also check if you buy in bags from stores that it smells good and doesn't contain mould. Good luck! Bunnies are the best.
     
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  13. Mar 6, 2019 #13

    VioletRose

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    Pine can be highly toxic so I don't recommend anything pine based, litter box, hay box or toys.
     
  14. Mar 6, 2019 #14

    Deludedbyreality

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    Screenshot_20190306-005058_Google.jpg

    Better to be safe than sorry, there are tons of info in regards to diet with some conflicting opinions. I feel if theres any question at all about it just avoid it and steer towards things that have a definite ok.
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    Back to the original topic...a high-sided cat litter pan would be best for multiple reasons:
    1. Does (females) back into a corner and lean back on their haunches when doing their business ( high sides prevent overhang and accidents).
    2. They tend to be oversized and roomy enough for one or more bunnies to go together if you choose to get a buddy for her.
    3. Some bunnies like to lay down and chill or even sleep in their litterboxes, again extra space ensures she will have a clean area to do so.
    I use a brand of litter purchased from Tractor Supply which is a compressed pine pellet with carbon (cuts down on any odors) and do litter box changes 2-3 times a week. It's called Cozy n' Fresh. I tried other things when my local store didnt have any at the time, but found my bunnies had poor reactions to them allergies, sneezing, digging and such, switched back after ordering online and have never had a problem since.

    As far as bedding is concerned I agree with the previous comments on fleece throws and memory foam bath mats, just be sure that shes not digging the foam up and chewing/eating whatever you give to her as it can pose an issue, fleece blankets are easy to wash if there are any accidents and when they get worn out and ratty you can cut them up and make them into simple and quick toys for her. You can look up on YouTube or Pinterest how.

    As far as treats go rabbits can't metabolize sugar well, very similar to a person with diabetes, so while they love sweets (fruits and high sugar veggies) they shouldn't get them very often. I'd say up to 2-3 times a week and very little in amounts. Think an inch or 2 of a banana or 2 baby carrots or 1-2 wedges of a sliced apple cut in 8 pcs. My bunnies dont even get these but maybe once every so often when they've been especially good and get more regular changes of herbs as treats tossed in with their veggie (greens) bowls. I have untreated land that I gather wild grasses and weeds and herbs for them from as well- dandelion well washed is a favorite and very good for them when its growing.
    I also use the term treat for a chew stick bundle I also purchase from Tractor Supply, purely out of convenience I've seen it sold elsewhere as well, labeled Mega Munch Sticks sold by CritterWare it's an all natural Willow Twig bundle that's safe for them and added benefits of wearing down their ever growing teeth and having mild pain relief.
    I also make these...
    Screenshot_20190306-013035_Pinterest.jpg Screenshot_20190306-015333_Pinterest.jpg Screenshot_20190306-015607_Pinterest.jpg
    The link provided in Blue eyes' post provides a generalized list of stuff to get you started, however, I would add a couple of things in terms of first aid kit to keep on hand.
    • Chamomile: (either dried flowers which you can purchase in bulk or prepackaged as chamomile tea must have no additives just chamomile). This can be either fed to your bunny for mild pain relief/ relaxation for stressed out buns or made into a tea for multiple applications ranging from butt baths or to attend to hutch burn or uti care if your bun ever encounters these issues. It can also be used for wound care with some honey dissolved in it while still warm (warm not hot the honey is an antimicrobial and the good bacteria will die if the tea is too hot). Bonus they also just like to nom on it regularly with no ill effects and you can toss some into their hay from time to time as a nice treat.
    • Grow some Echinacea, by growing this yourself you can provide your bunny with some much needed immune support if she gets sick and offer some from time to time as a preventative. Seeds are cheap, the flowers are pretty, and it's easy to use just pluck and hang to dry keep them in a ziploc till needed.
    • Vetericyn +Plus Wound & Skin Care, this stuff is honestly a miracle in a bottle and I can't recommend it enough. There is also a gel for eyes. Safe for use on bunnies, cats, dogs, horses...
    • All ointments must be zinc and pain relief free make sure to read labels!!! Zinc is toxic to rabbits and they metabolize pain medications much faster than we do so you can really put your bunny at risk when using things with them unintentionally. You should have Hemorrhoid Ointment (hutch burn - wet dewlap/ dermatitis) & Neosporin (regular label) (general wound care use) on hand for things. As well as some Vet Wrap if there is ever a need for it you will be glad you have it when the vet is closed and something pops up.
    • Bene-bac Plus is a probiotic for rabbits, good to give from time to time in general it will stabilize their digestive bacteria balance, however, especially after traveling, surgeries, pregancies-births, rounds of antibiotics. It comes in both powder and pre-packed (gel) syringes.
    • Canned Pumpkin, is especially good to have on hand if your bunny ever goes off her food, you can mix it with the Oxbow Critical Care ( Fine Grind) and if necessary orally syringe feed until you have access to your vet for care. She'll be more willing to take it with the pumpkin and the added nutrients and hydration plus fiber are a bonus. Just make sure it's pure pumpkin not pumpkin pie mix. You can also use it for the hay biscuit recipe I posted above!
    • Papaya Tablets, (dried papaya pieces with no added sugar, marketed for bunnies, not what you would buy for yourself) help prevent wool block and can work against bloat and maintain a healthy digestive tract for your bunny as a result. Plus they're yummy (for them) and can work as a treat!
    I strongly recommend the YouTube videos here as well as Howcast's rabbit series.
    I personally no longer have rabbits that require combing as mine barely shed at all and do not molt. I do have a modified comb like the one in the video posted by an above commenter as well as the furminator that I use for my cats still.

    This is a link I give to all bunny parents as well https://riseandshinerabbitry.com/2012/06/09/medicinal-herbs-for-rabbits/.

    I know my post was long winded but I hope you found it useful, between it and the link in Blue eyes' post the two combined contain most of the info I provide to my own adopters, and I wish you and your new companion all the best! Screenshot_20190306-012744_Pinterest.jpg
     
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  15. Mar 6, 2019 #15

    Blue eyes

    Blue eyes

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    As I said, iceberg is not "toxic." ;)
    A rabbit isn't going to die if it eats a couple leaves of iceberg. (Though I still would not recommend feeding it.)

    Greens like parsley and spinach are high in oxolates or calcium and can be likewise harmful if fed in large quantities.
     
  16. Mar 19, 2019 #16

    Yukishi

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    I was new to this too but i do go by this one treat my bunnies love which are the the ones in the picture and usually ive used tidy cats but ima probably be getting regular bunny litter and usually my bunnies love any kind of toys 1553011331375.jpeg
     
  17. Mar 19, 2019 #17

    Augustus&HazelGrace

    Augustus&HazelGrace

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    Those treats are not good for rabbits. Any of the store made treats with yogurt are not good for them, because rabbits are not able to digest the lactose in them, And I'm sure that you have read on here how sensitive rabbits digestive systems are. Also, cat litter is not good for them as it is dusty and it can cause respiratory issues, I suggest using wood pellets from a local hardware store or the ones made for horses at a local farm store. Just make sure they are not Cedar, as it is bad for rabbits.
     
  18. Mar 19, 2019 #18

    Blue eyes

    Blue eyes

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    Wood pellets will be cheaper than any cat litter or even "bunny litter" too!

    Skip any store-bought treats. Those are not only bad for rabbits but many of those treats are actually harmful. Just because they are "made" for rabbits doesn't mean they are safe. It is just a way for the company to make money. A slice of fruit is way cheaper and much better for your rabbit.
     
  19. Mar 23, 2019 #19

    Theo

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    So... I have been feeding my rabbit those store bought treats along with tons of fruits and veggies. Would ya'll recommended that I stop feeding those to him? He loves Timothy Biscuits and the yogurt drops, is there anyway I could make homemade yogurt drops? Are the Timothy Biscuits okay?
     
  20. Mar 24, 2019 #20

    Alyssa and Bugs♡

    Alyssa and Bugs♡

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    Yogurt drops aren't safe. Rabbits can't digest dairy after 8 weeks of age. Are timothy biscuits like hay cubes?
     
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