Neutered bunny humping

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Kopol

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Hi
I neutered my bunny 2 years ago but recently he humps the other bunny although it's been a few month and there are no babies but he pulls out her hair and bites her what should I do?
 

Preitler

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Welcome :)

I would give her a place to retreat to - something like a low table where she can go under, but low enough that the other rabbit can't hump her. I have no experience with neutered bucks, but with intact ones excessive humping is seasonal and gets better after some time.
 

Kopol

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I was thinking maybe he's not completely neutered? Though he's not agressive like before the surgery, he's usually very gentle and doesn't really hurt her
 

Preitler

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None of my intact bucks was ever aggressive and never hurt a doe, and they are very gentle indeed.

Others might be able to comment on that, about pretty hormonal behaviour after 2 years, can't put my finger on it but I might have read about such stuff.
 

John Wick

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Is the other rabbit spayed? The presence of a hormonal rabbit can bring about hormonal behaviors in fixed rabbits.

Rabbits generally need guidance in being properly bonded so they get along. Fur pulling and biting are concerning signs. See here for information on bonding rabbits: Bonding Archives | BinkyBunny .. note to ensure a stable bond, both rabbits should be spayed/neutered.
 

JBun

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How long have they been together and bonded? Has anything changed in your rabbits environment recently(eg. change of area, furniture changed around, new pets, predators hanging around, loud noises occurring, etc)? Is he showing any other odd signs or changes of behavior that might indicate a potential health problem going on? Is the excessive humping causing your female rabbit to get upset or scared? How old is he now?
 

Kopol

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He's about six years old and the doe is five. They bonded pretty easily on their first interaction (5 years ago) and they've never had a problem.
The doe is not spayed but I've got an appointment for her I hope that make it go away
I can't think of any change that might have caused that, could it be out of boredom?
He seems healthy otherwise

(Thanks for the replies🌷🌷)
 
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Kopol

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And I remembered that he was neutered before I got the doe so he's been neutered for 5 years, time goes on too fast😅😶
 

JBun

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With no changes having occurred, and with them being bonded for so long, you could be looking at a health issue being the cause. If you aren't seeing any reduction of appetite, drooling, food dropping from the mouth, excessive ear scratching, signs of a skin condition, dribbling urine, a wet bum, or other signs of pain, then it's possible this could be related to an adrenal issue that's creating the unusual hormonal behavior. It's not common, but is something that can happen in spayed/neutered rabbits, especially older ones. If the behavior doesn't settle down and you think this could be a possible cause, it's something to have your vet look into by having the appropriate blood tests and scans done.


 

Momma Luvbun

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My fella began doing that this past spring. He wasn't pulling my girls fur out but he tried once, and he was nipping and chasing along with the mounting.
both my buns are fixed and have been for a couple yrs as well, so I too thought this behaviour odd.

I'm told it is most likely just residual hormones.
But, as stated above, it could also be that one has an underlying medical issue.
I'm getting ready to take my buns to the vet for their checkup and will be mentioning this to him. Now that a couple of months went by he isn't as bad, but he still chases and nips which is annoying, but they love eachother still, thankfully.

I'd recommend sperating them if your fella is litterally pulling out her fur. It could get nasty and you really don't want that.

Keep us posted 👍
 

Kopol

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She used to hump him because she's not spayed I'm waiting to see what happens after her surgery.
And I'll talk to the vet
 

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