Needing advice!! To neuter or not???

Help Support RabbitsOnline:

Kaitlynrose89

New Member
Joined
Jul 25, 2020
Messages
4
Reaction score
0
Location
Denton Texas
I have a 6 month old mini lop male. I’ve had him for about 3 months now. He is a free roam. Does not go in a cage ever. We bonded very quick and He is so sweet and has to be near me at all times. Or he runs around the house searching for me! He has never bitten or been aggressive towards anyone. He even gives kisses when told!! He is very smart, I taught him tons of tricks And He even likes to go on walks! i also got him litter boxed trained in one day!! And hasn’t gone outside of his box since! I was so proud of my little guy!!

Lately he has started circling me and honking which i believe is a sign of wanting to mate. But I’ve heard that it’s also totally okay and healthy not to chop off his stuff. This is my first bunny and I did months of research before even rescuing him but i am torn on getting him neutered or not. Someone please give me an honest answer!!! He is just already so prefect is there a chance his behavior will change?
 

Attachments

Catlyn

Well-Known Member
Joined
Oct 12, 2019
Messages
851
Reaction score
367
Location
Estonia
Not in a million years!
He looks adoooorable!
My first/past bun Musti:20191106_165114.jpg
Such a sweet cuddly hunky bun! Gave us all kisses and followed us around, laid in our lap and nudged for attention! Licked my tears when i cried.
He was perfect too, until honking at me and humping mum's arm and once, her head. Sprayed everywhere!
Got him fixed, fretted like crazy, but he was a ok! Nothing good had turned bad about him, he just stopped all the naughty behaviours. He did have a milligram less energy since hormones weren't driving him but naught! That didn't stop him from galloping round our yard and digging a trench underneath the outdoor table!
He was sleepy the first day but back to normal the next!
Storm, my second/current bun:
Didn't bat an eyelid after being neutered! Three hours after all fatique had left him! He's still the mischevious shmuck he's always been!
Third/current bun Lűmi: honestly have no ide yet, we just arrived home! We'll see!

So you don't have to worry, emptying his sacks isn't going to have any negative effects on him!
 

Kaitlynrose89

New Member
Joined
Jul 25, 2020
Messages
4
Reaction score
0
Location
Denton Texas
Oh yay!! Thank you so much!! That was extremely helpful!!! I’ve just read so many times where they can die during surgery and that is just terrifying. But if it could eventually make my sweet boy happier in His adult life then I’m going to assume the risk is worth it :)
 

Catlyn

Well-Known Member
Joined
Oct 12, 2019
Messages
851
Reaction score
367
Location
Estonia
Oh yay!! Thank you so much!! That was extremely helpful!!! I’ve just read so many times where they can die during surgery and that is just terrifying. But if it could eventually make my sweet boy happier in His adult life then I’m going to assume the risk is worth it :)
If you find a savvy vet-many good vets/vet lists avaliable in USA and UK, yet again, nothing much to worry about! The modern medicine has developed so far that although always surgical risks exist, they're at such a low precentage! 98% of buns pull throuh just fine!
 

Blue eyes

Staff member
Moderator
Supporting Member
Joined
Mar 19, 2012
Messages
7,377
Reaction score
3,705
Location
Arizona, USA
Another consideration is whether or not you think that there will ever be a time that you want to get him a bondmate. If that's a future possibility, then neutering now is a good idea.

If that really isn't likely to happen, and if you are fine with him circling & honking, and if his hormonal behavior doesn't escalate, then it isn't absolutely necessary to have him fixed. Intact males that are not displaying annoying hormonal behaviors can be fine remaining intact.

If you do decide to neuter, I'd stress being sure you get a very rabbit-savvy vet to do the procedure. Most say they do neuter surgeries, but find out how often and how many they do. The more experience, the better.
 

Kaitlynrose89

New Member
Joined
Jul 25, 2020
Messages
4
Reaction score
0
Location
Denton Texas
Another consideration is whether or not you think that there will ever be a time that you want to get him a bondmate. If that's a future possibility, then neutering now is a good idea.

If that really isn't likely to happen, and if you are fine with him circling & honking, and if his hormonal behavior doesn't escalate, then it isn't absolutely necessary to have him fixed. Intact males that are not displaying annoying hormonal behaviors can be fine remaining intact.

If you do decide to neuter, I'd stress being sure you get a very rabbit-savvy vet to do the procedure. Most say they do neuter surgeries, but find out how often and how many they do. The more experience, the better.
To be honest I don’t think I will get him a bondmate... he is enough bunny for one household. LOL I work from home so we spend 24/7 together. He is very attached to me and honestly I don’t want him to not need my affection anymore haha! I also do not mind the circling and honking.. ugh I’m so torn! There is only 1 vet within 2 hours from me that even sees rabbits so finding one that I trust will be hard.. thank you so much for taking the time to give me such great advice!
 

Preitler

Loony bunny guy
Supporting Member
Joined
Jul 19, 2015
Messages
1,309
Reaction score
885
Location
Austria
Just some other experience, my free range buck is intact. I took him in when he was 2, wouldn't have worked well before, he sprayed so much, pee was dripping from the ceiling of his hutch. Does that got too close changed colour. That settled somewhat, and when he ventured into the house and behaved I took him in. Worked well, after a year I got the impression that he looks lonely (I'm not home that much) and got one of his daughters spayed as his cuddlebun.
I really considered neutering him because he spent hours each day following Dotty and trying to hump her, also there was something to mop up 2-3 times a week because he didn't bother where he sprayed her, she's such a patient girl and keeps hopping away, but now ho got athrosis and that reduced it a lot, at least it motivates him to exercise somewhat which is good for his condition.
 

HollyNFriends

New Member
Joined
Feb 25, 2014
Messages
4
Reaction score
1
Location
NULL
We just neutered our bunny. He was fine after the surgery and there was no change in his temperament. We used a cat and exotic vet with lots of experience.

The health and behavioral benefits of neutering (and spaying) are a dealbreaker. We really want this guy to be a long-term, indoor, family pet that can free-roam, and neutering seriously increases the odds that things will work out this way. We've cared for friends' intact males when they're out of town, and the spray, stains and stink made them outdoor pets only. I was certainly hesitant to get a boy this time around because of that!

After the neuter, we mostly let him be the first few days after having read about some bunnies that had changed afterward. The stories had reminded me of when our dog was neutered, though. He really struggled with the pinch as the incision was healing, hardly able to walk trying to figure it out, trying to snap at whatever was pinching him. This isn't typical post-neuter behavior, and he got over after a few days of healing. Our plan was to let our bunny rest and heal in peace, only giving him short bits of attention if he welcomed it. We didn't want him to associate or confuse any possibly lingering pain with his people. Letting them rest and heal is in their best interest anyway.

We also got our bunny neutered young, hoping to avoid the first hormonal surge (not wanting him to spray in the first place is better than hoping it will stop) and reduce the "teen years" intensity. Since he was approaching that phase, though, we were also were ready to accept that this surgery could coincide with some of those changes and didn't intend to blame it on the surgery.
 

JBun

Jenny - Health & Wellness Mod
Staff member
Administrator
Moderator
Joined
Sep 10, 2012
Messages
8,425
Reaction score
2,638
Location
Utah, , USA
With neutering, behavior doesn't usually change except for reducing or limiting unwanted hormonal behaviors. BUT there is always a slight chance it can cause unwanted behavior changes, like aggressiveness or make them less affectionate when there never was this behavior before. Now, this is extremely unusual, but it is still a slight possibility, so should be carefully considered when thinking about going ahead, particularly if neutering isn't necessary for correcting bothersome hormonal issues or for plans for bonding with another rabbit. It's true there is always a risk of cancer occurring, but it's less unusual to happen in an unaltered male rabbit as opposed to female rabbits who have a much higher risk.

Though the surgery itself is generally considered pretty safe and less invasive for male rabbits, it's still surgery and surgery always carries some risk regardless of whether or not you have a very knowledgeable rabbit vet doing it. Though the better the vet is and having bloodwork done before hand, does help minimize the risks a great deal. I know personally that the risks involved are real. Not to dissuade anyone or scare anyone from doing it, but these things can and do happen even though not often. So it's best to go into the decision fully aware of what the risks involved are.

If you don't plan on bonding him with another rabbit anytime soon, he isn't spraying, humping, or exhibiting bad litter habits, and if you don't mind the circling or honking, I personally would hold off on neutering. If he started wanting to mate with you or starts spaying, then that might change things. But I personally would be good with not neutering for now.
 

Latest posts

Top