need some help ,my bunny dyed getting spayed!

Discussion in 'General Rabbit Discussion' started by chelseajuliam, Feb 7, 2019.

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  1. Feb 7, 2019 #1

    chelseajuliam

    chelseajuliam

    chelseajuliam

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    anybody have any thoughts on this? my baby bunny died 2 days ago in surgery,should we be fixing our bunnies?
     
  2. Feb 7, 2019 #2

    Anna R.

    Anna R.

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    i am wondering the same thing. I have never had my bunnies spayed, and they have been wonderful with no aggression issues. How important is it really to have them fixed? I know females have a higher risk of ovarian cancer if not fixed; but, from what I have heard it is very rare in certain breeds. Is it recommended (fixing) for aggression issues and temperament? I do have one female that is spayed as I rescued her (I did not have it done myself). I understand spaying is supposed to stop certain behaviors such as "digging", aggression, spraying, etc. I have four buns and out of the four, the one that is spayed is the most aggressive, digs the most, and she still sprays. So, if they still continue to do these things after spaying, what is really the point? Would she be worse if she wasn't spayed? I guess I really want to know what is the point of spaying other than avoiding having multiplying rabbits? And, why is there such an emphasis on it? I feel horrible for Chelseajuliam losing her baby. I hate hearing about people losing their bunnies, it breaks my heart. Is it really worth the risk of the surgery, especially in females when it is so invasive? Do the pros really out weigh the cons? All bunnies are so different, so how can something be recommended so much when there is such a difference between rabbits?
     
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  3. Feb 7, 2019 #3

    Blue eyes

    Blue eyes

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    So sorry to hear about this. Could you expand more? How old was your rabbit? Where did she come from? Was the vet referred to you? Did the vet offer any explanation? Did they have you fast your rabbit before surgery?
     
  4. Feb 7, 2019 #4

    Blue eyes

    Blue eyes

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    There's no way, of course, to tell if she would have been worse without the spay but some rabbits are certainly more aggressive just by their own temperament. Who knows if she may have been far worse without the spay.

    However one particular article that JBun linked, I found quite interesting. They mentioned that some vets only remove the uterus during a spay and not the ovaries too. If the ovaries are not also removed, then hormones can still be problematic and the risk of cancer still remains. It made me wonder if that could possibly have been the case with your girl??
    http://wabbitwiki.com/wiki/Spaying_and_neutering_rabbits
     
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  5. Feb 7, 2019 #5

    Popsicles

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    It really is a personal choice based on your own rabbit, I didn’t get Poppy spayed until she was about a year old, she was having constant false pregnancies and plucking herself bald, she was also very aggressively humping, biting, very territorial... I ended up with a very cuddly sweet fantastic bunny. It is really really sad that some do die under the anaesthetic, it is just a case of weighing the benefits and risks in your own personal situation. for me it was a no-brainer.
     
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  6. Feb 7, 2019 #6

    Popsicles

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    As for leaving ovaries behind deliberately, it is also possible for ovarian remnants to be left by accident (as ovaries in rabbits are so so tiny!).
    And as much as we hear some sad stories of bunnies lost to the anaesthetic, we also get many members on here saying they wish they had spayed their girls who later died of uterine cancer. There is no clear cut answer I’m afraid, as with all medicine.
     
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  7. Feb 8, 2019 #7

    Kelly6485

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    I'm sorry for your loss!

    I had my female bunny spayed at 5 months old , prior to being spayed she was a lunatic, she was very territorial, she had bitten everyone in our house , she scratched, you name it. We thought she was the devil. Since her spay (she is over a year now) she is a new rabbit, she never ever bites, and isn't territorial in the least. Spaying her turned her into a lovely little bunny!
     
  8. Feb 9, 2019 #8

    Poopy Poo

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    I will follow this thread I have two 13-14 weeks rabbits male and female and I keep watching them I would really want them live more natural life and have kits and all, especially after I've read that they bond for life, it's really cruel to fix them, on the other hand you can't have 6 little kits every couple months and you don't want to keep your rabbits in separate cages and then there's behaviour aggression etc, I don't know mine are still very young I believe there's not so much choice and they will have to be fixed.

    By the way, my third rabbit is an adult rescued I don't know what age but he's not very young, he's here about 3 weeks and feeling comfortable, eats very well but I've got feeling he might be fixed he's not curious happy in his cage doesn't want to socialize he likes his cuddles and all but he's very calm indeed, interesting, how do you know if he's fixed can you tell just judging by behaviour or something else. Honestly I wouldn't go to vet to find out.
     
  9. Feb 9, 2019 #9

    Binkis Mum

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    Binki was a rescue, and she wasn't spayed. We got another rescue, and they fought like crazy (we couldn't have them together, even if supervised). We had the both spayed, but it didn't change anything.
     
  10. Feb 12, 2019 #10

    chelseajuliam

    chelseajuliam

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    she was about 6 -7 months,was a rescue,no clue where she came from.she was left in a box in my daughters friends store.Poppy was the sweetest thing,i feel sick from this.The vet was very confident in the surgery,i think they screwed up,they said she aspirated .They told me not to fast her.I should not have done this,she was amazing,heart is broken.Poppy was a little white lionhead, i held her after and i cannot stop crying.thank you
     
  11. Feb 12, 2019 #11

    Anna R.

    Anna R.

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    oh my...I am crying for you as I am writing this. She sounds like an amazing little girl and you were just doing what you thought was best for her. That's all you wanted for your sweet girl. You did the right thing not fasting her, rabbits should never be fasted. I am sure she was so grateful you rescued her, and you were so very blessed with the short time you had with her. You did everything right for her, and that is all you could have done. Please don't blame yourself. You did nothing wrong and everything right. Sometimes the very sweetest things in this world are taken from us for no reason. I can't explain it, and no one can. You were robbed...But, it is NOT your fault. Remember that, and be grateful for the blessed gift you were touched with. She will forever be in your heart, she is binking and happy in heaven. I am so very very sorry for your loss.
     
  12. Feb 15, 2019 #12

    Blue eyes

    Blue eyes

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    Given that she had such unknown history, any number of things could have been contributing factors. It was kind of you to rescue her. Just to clarify, she was not "a rescue" in the sense that some would assume -- that she was from an organized rabbit rescue. Rabbit rescues have each of their rabbits vet-checked and fixed before adopting out. If a rescue had gotten this rabbit, they would have done the exact same thing that you did -- have her spayed. If there were unknown health factors, the same result could very well have happened. If it was that your vet was too inexperienced, that's something to be wary of for the future. (Years ago, I lost a rabbit because I put too much trust in a vet who didn't know better.) Either way, you did nothing wrong by having her spayed. Such results are so very very rare. Just sorry that you had to be the one to experience it.
     
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  13. Feb 15, 2019 #13

    chelseajuliam

    chelseajuliam

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    THANK YOU!!! i do feel guilty,but i know it was not my fault miss her kisses ,i appreciate you writing this
     

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