My rabbits suddenly died one after another

Discussion in 'General Rabbit Discussion' started by doraanddonut, Feb 11, 2019.

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  1. Feb 11, 2019 #1

    doraanddonut

    doraanddonut

    doraanddonut

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    I am really in a shock and depression right now, i can't forget them, every now and then i think of them.

    I had bought one pair of rabbit on 5th Feb 2019, this was my first rabbit purchase and first experience.
    I fed them fresh Bermuda grass and cauliflower leaves, sometimes carrots.
    On 9th Feb 2019, one rabbit was popping liquid at night, i kept only bermuda grass there to eat for them.
    And the next morning when i wake up that is on 10th Feb 2019, one rabbit was not in good condition as he had popped liquid alot. I made him drink water by opening his mouth as from past 5 days they wer not drinking water at all.
    The rabbit had no energy to stand and he was crawling upside down, i was really worried and got afraid watching this and after some time he screamed and cried and he was gone.
    I was in trauma how can the rabbit go like this way.
    Then coming to second rabbit, he was healthy and popping normal in morning i played with him alot and then kept back him in his cage.
    In afternoon when i was watching him, in his cage only he fell down while standing, keeping his leg up.
    When i took him, he was not able to stand and crawling upside down, this was horrible as in one day this has happened twice and i never thought this second one healthy rabbit would also go like this way.
    He struggled for a while and crawled in same way like first one and after a while he was also gone.

    So now may i know, what was the reason behind their death?


    I am totally depressed by their death and can't stop thinking of them. Every now and then i am remembering them and when i watch the empty cage it hurts alot. They not even lasted 5 days with me since purchase, let me tell you that they wer very young.

    According to me i am feeling that these pet store people might hav sold me infected rabbits or i have done some mistake while feeding them?

    Is this how rabbit die?? is this normal among all rabbits?
     
  2. Feb 11, 2019 #2

    JBun

    JBun

    JBun

    Jenny - Health & Wellness Mod Staff Member Administrator Moderator

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    I'm very sorry both your bunnies died. It sounds like they may have had clostridial enterotoxemia or ate something toxic/poisonous. Clostridial enterotoxemia is an often fatal digestive disease caused by the pathogenic clostridium bacteria. If the rabbits were healthy when you got them, then it's likely they picked up the bacteria from their food, water, or the environment where you kept them. Another possibility could be they ingested a toxin/poison from their food, water, or environment, including some medications, pesticides, rodenticide, toxic metals, toxic plants.

    If you decide to get rabbits again I would suggest making sure that they have a good clean water source free of bacteria or toxins(using a good bottled water if necessary), and until they are older(12-16 weeks old) I wouldn't give them any vegetables, and when you do feed vegetables when they are older, make sure they are also good quality and free of harmful herbicides/pesticides. From the start I would feed a good quality grass hay, free fed so that they never run out of it. You will want to make sure the bermuda or other grass hay that you use is not moldy or spoiled at all. Moldy hay may be damp, have black or white spots on the strands of hay, may be coated with a white dust, or may smell sour or musty. Good hay should smell sweet and have a good green color to it. You also don't want it to contain any toxic weeds and you want to make sure it is coming from a reliable source that doesn't spray it with anything harmful. You should also go over the rabbits environment very thoroughly to make sure there are no toxins in it, including painted items(walls, furniture, etc) that may contain old paint with lead in it, make sure there are no rodent poisons, no toxic plants, and don't use any toxic cleaning chemicals in their environment.
    http://www.medirabbit.com/EN/GI_diseases/Weaning/Sevrage_en.htm (WARNING: link contains graphic necropsy photo)
    http://thebunnyguy.com/wordpress/9-common-causes-of-rabbit-poisoning/
     
  3. Feb 11, 2019 #3

    doraanddonut

    doraanddonut

    doraanddonut

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    Thanks for your inputs, BTW my both rabbits were not touching water. I used to keep clean boiled water, that too after coming at room temperature.
     
  4. Feb 12, 2019 #4

    Imbrium

    Imbrium

    Imbrium

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    I'm so sorry for your loss! How heartbreaking :(. How young is "very young"? They really shouldn't be sold/given to new homes until at least 8 weeks old - if whoever you bought them from was selling them younger than that, then I wouldn't be surprised if they were being irresponsible in other ways as well (environment not clean/sanitary, weaning too young, etc.) that could cause health problems.
     
  5. Feb 12, 2019 #5

    doraanddonut

    doraanddonut

    doraanddonut

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    Here are their pictures:

    [​IMG]

    When died:
    [​IMG]
     
  6. Feb 12, 2019 #6

    Tooattatched

    Tooattatched

    Tooattatched

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    I’m extremely sorry for your loss. Best regards to you and your family.
    They look awfully young to be given that amount of greens. Really young rabbits need to be kept on a diet of hay and pellets until about 4 months, then slowly introduced to greens. It could have caused a severe tummy upset, however how serious this was it doesn’t sound like it was just that. Pet shop rabbits are often neglected and not looked after while they are there. So it’s possible an existing condition worsened with the new environment and types of food.
     
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  7. Feb 13, 2019 #7

    RWAF

    RWAF

    RWAF

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    I'm so sorry that you have had such distressing losses. Heartbreaking

    Have you heard of RVHD2? It's a viral disease that recently mutated into a highly dangerous strain that is spread frighteningly easily. It can be passed on by direct contact between rabbits of course but it is also airborne, it can be carried by biting insects and on the clothes, shoes, skin and hair of people and the fur and paws of other animals. It can survive in the gut of birds and so is present in faeces of any birds that have fed from the carcass of an infected rabbit. It also survives in the environment, outside of the body of an infected rabbit for a long time, up to a year if the conditions are right. There are usually no visible symptoms, previously healthy rabbits are simply found dead.

    There is information on our website as follows

    https://rabbitwelfare.co.uk/rabbit-health/rabbit-vhd/
    https://rabbitwelfare.co.uk/rabbit-health/further-reading/rvhd-further-reading/

    And about the vaccines we can get in the UK here https://rabbitwelfare.co.uk/rabbit-health/vaccinations/

    It has been identified in Canada (where vaccine has been imported from France) and in Western USA. It has already ravaged the wild population of rabbits in the UK (and mainland Europe) and of course killed many pets also, and it was recently reported to have made a species jump to hares, so it is possible that your native lagomorphs may also be infected at some point, if they aren't already. If that is the case, it will be able to travel around the Americas much more easily. Given that it has managed to cross the Atlantic, presumably on some traveller's clothing, that doesn't seem likely to be out of the question.

    There is a Facebook group in existence where people are trying to make vaccine available for all of North America https://www.facebook.com/groups/414749742307886/?ref=br_rs
     
  8. Feb 13, 2019 #8

    Lauren Kiernan

    Lauren Kiernan

    Lauren Kiernan

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    So sorry for your loss. I am a first time Rabbit owner. I am glad I did a lot of research about rabbit care when my son talked me into a baby rabbit. I didn't know they could be so fragile. As said in previous posts, this may have been unavoidable but just in case, read up on young rabbit care before trying again and see if there is a vet nearby that you can take them that is familiar with rabbits to verify their health.
    Again, so sad for your loss. They look sweet.
     
  9. Feb 13, 2019 #9

    Bailey ❤️

    Bailey ❤️

    Bailey ❤️

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    My heart goes out to you for having to watch those babies go through all that trauma

    Bunnies have a way of making their way into our hearts, no matter how short period of time you’ve had them.

    Please know that it couldn’t have been anything you did alone that made this outcome. We all make mistakes, especially if new to this bunny business, but for those babies to act that way is completely bizarre, and it must have been some prexisting condition they had prior to you bringing them home.

    Also, keep in mind that pet store bunnies are not always in the best condition. Your babies looked rather young, so by the time they even get to the pet store, they had already been weaned from their mother way too early. They need to be with mother at least a full eight weeks to get all her cecals and get their tummies ready for other food because they have a very delicate digestive system.

    Furthermore, that breed of rabbit, the white with the red eyes, is a New Zealand White with Albinism, and typically, they are bred as “meat rabbits,” and not as domestic pets, so it could also have been something in their genetic history that caused whatever prexisting condition they might have had. And, just as someone mentioned earlier, all that coupled with their new environment with you, and new type of food could have been stress factors added in to the overall picture.

    Please don’t give up on having a pet bunny, for they are wonderful, lovely creatures!!

    I hope in time, we see you as a regular on here with your new bunny or bunnies that are healthy, happy, and binky free!!! ❤️
     
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  10. Feb 21, 2019 #10

    softcottoncloud☁️

    softcottoncloud☁️

    softcottoncloud☁️

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    Not all white albino rabbits are New Zealand's. And New Zealand's have been bred as meat rabbits solely because of the fact that they are a large breed and very docile and easy to handle. This is the same reason they are also used in laboratory testing (and also specifically bred for it), because they aren't as aggressive as smaller breeds. Due to their docile nature they actually make very good pets, even better then some of the other breeds. They do not have genetic "problems" as a "breed" on a whole but moreso depends on the individual breeder.
     
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  11. Feb 23, 2019 #11

    softcottoncloud☁️

    softcottoncloud☁️

    softcottoncloud☁️

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    This is what Dana Krempels, PhD says:

    Sadly, many baby rabbits are weaned too young to be away from their mothers. Instead of being allowed to nurse for a full, normal eight weeks, they are taken away while they are still "cute" and marketable--often as young as four weeks. This can spell death for many of them.

    Without mother's antibodies, complex organic compounds and proper pH environment her milk provides to help protect the baby's intestines, these babies are highly susceptible to over-proliferation of foreign bacteria. One of the most common culprits of runny stool in baby rabbits is accidental infection by the common human intestinal bacterium, Escherichia coli. This is transmitted from humans to baby rabbits during handling, since these bacteria are all over us, not just in our intestines. Handling an unweaned infant rabbit without properly washing and disinfecting one's hands is a good way to transmit these opportunistic pathogens. Even a loving kiss on a too-young baby rabbit's lips can kill. Until a young rabbit is at least eight weeks old, she should not be taken from her mother, as mama's milk affords protection against E. coli and other bacteria until the baby's own immune system can handle them.

    Your other second pair of rabbits were also only 45 days old (younger than the 2 month minimum) along with this first pair. Being taken away/weaned off their mothers milk too early along with poor diet and conditions at the pet store are the reasons. You didn't give them a poor diet but they were too young for it, they needed mother's milk until at least 2 or 3 months.
     
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