My female gave birth!

Discussion in 'General Rabbit Discussion' started by JetFalcon, Sep 30, 2019.

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  1. Oct 6, 2019 #21

    zupper

    zupper

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    Very cute but they are still one week old and need to stay in their nest for another 7 weeks, it your rabbit is a free roam you should get a cage or a larger cardboard box so they can stay there for their own safety. You can't take them to the park before they are weaned at 8 weeks and I wouldn't suggest on taking their mother to the park either while she's nursing. They look great and you want to keep them for sure but they are still extremely vulnerable and rely on their mother's health, please don't put them at risk. She feeds them once a day when you can't see.
     
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  2. Oct 6, 2019 #22

    zupper

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    They need to be fed their mother's milk until they are at least 6 weeks, usually until they are 8 weeks so they can grow healthy and strong. They will start nibbling hay when they are just 2-3 weeks old and will be stealing their mother's pellets as well, but they need her milk until 6-8 weeks, then you'll see they are not chasing their mother begging for milk anymore and eat lots of hay and pellets. Until then they stay with mother.
     
  3. Oct 6, 2019 #23

    majorv

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    Once their eyes are open and getting around better they’ll start eating hay and nibbling on mom’s pellets. Baby proof where they are because they’ll be exploring and could end up somewhere they shouldn’t. Usually the doe decides when to wean the kits.
     
  4. Oct 6, 2019 #24

    JetFalcon

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    I see should I put some pellets / hay / water nearby? They are on the second story of the cage. And the cage is open so the bunny can free roam the balcony.

    I don’t think they’re eating solid food yet but they are squishy. I’ll wait till I take them out, they still seem young and their eyes aren’t open

    You’re saying the bunnies should stay in their nest to rest / grow?
     
  5. Oct 7, 2019 #25

    Elicia-Mae

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    You need to be socialising them little and often when they hit about 6/8 weeks.
     
  6. Oct 7, 2019 #26

    April LD

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    In a few weeks you should move them from the second story of the cage. They will begin to wander out of the box between 10 - 13 weeks and you don't want them to fall. They don't really hope/walk/craw they jump all haphazard and they could really injure themselves if they were to hop out of the box. Also, make sure the porch is completely screen in...they are small and will be able to fit through VERY SMALL spaces.

    To socialize them, you need to make sure people wash their hands first. I used to take mine to our vet clinic to socialize and see about possible adoptions. Figured, if they are at the vet they are taking care of their fur babies.
    You can socialize with them at home too....the more you handle them and for long amounts is better. I took them once their eyes were opened and they went once a week to socialize and give mom a break. Everyone had to wash their hands first, my bun moms didn't care. We were only gone for about an hour and a half when they were still nursing. My does nursed mostly at night between 10:30 p.m. and 1 a.m. until they got older. then they nursed twice once in the morning (when I fed the moms babies ate, and same in the evening). They will also steal the freshies that you give mom about 2.5 - 3 months old. I had to remove the moms if I could so they could have their freshies and the babies didn't get too much.

    I've had 4 litters and that's what we did with ours. I wouldn't take them to the park at this time - unless you keep them away from people and pets/grass. Be careful and make sure they do't spray pesticides on the grass, it could make all your bunnies sick, even the babies since they eat from mom. Too many people handling them could get them sick; but if you want them to be used to smells and sounds they could stay in a carrier, only touched by you.

    They are adorable! Enjoy it, they grow so fast!!!
     
  7. Oct 7, 2019 #27

    Preitler

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    Most has been already said, anyway, my 2cents..

    They will wander out of the box a few days after they open their eyes at 12-14 days. They don't need to stay in the nest, it will be their safe base for weeks though. At about 2 weeks they start to nibble on mums food, you can put a little oatmeal in the nestbox so they can start with that, buit it's not necessary. Mums normal food close to the nestbox is ok.


    When they start to venture out - most likely you will not notice for the forst days they do it - it is important that they always can go back into the nest, no steps, drops, or tight spaces where they could squeeze into (like between hidy house and wall) should be within their reach. If you use a high walled nestbox you can either put ramps around, or tilt it on it's side then. Remember, in nature the nest is an earth hole, no matter where they go getting home is easy.
    They are small. They fit through small gaps and holes. And, some of them can climb, much better than adults (some of mine kept escaping through an air ventilation slot on top of as 2ft high hutch door with hexagonal wire).
    If you use a big water bowl, I would replace it with a smaller, shallow one until they are about 4 weeks.

    With the nest on the second story I would relocate it to the ground floor and close off the second story for now if there is any chance they could get out of there, and not back up. Doe wouldn't be thrilled though, I put the does nose 2-3 times to the nest and restrict her to a rather small area until she fed them there, just to make sure she knows where the nest is.

    Socialising...
    If you want them to be used to humans I would start now, handle them a little, pet them in their nest (when they aren't hungry). and keep up doing that so that big, hairless ape doesn't come as a shock when they leave the nest, and they learn that being handled isn't something too scary and acdcept it. Depending on individiul characters, most still wont like it as adults, but there's imho a huge difference between being scared or just annoyed.
    Imho, it makes a huge difference when they are handled early and consistantly.
     
  8. Oct 8, 2019 #28

    zupper

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    I just want to second what was said about second floor it is not safe they can injure themselves easily and all what was said in above two posts just can add:

    Socializing. Take them off nest once a day, for 30-60 mins if you want to, I see you really like them but that is not necessary, even 10-15 mins every day would be enough, other than that it is best to leave them be and their mother will take care of them.

    They should open their eyes in the next couple days and it will change their behaviour let them explore and do what they want but you need to make their space safe, so firstly move them down and remove the ramp to the second floor, and all what was mentioned about gaps and cage spacing, just make it safe you won't be able to watch them 24/7.

    I say No to the park and all, just too much risk, why? Keep them at home and mostly in their cage with nestbox available as their base until they are 4 weeks at least, then they won't need nestbox but give them a little litter tray you can train them to use it, some babies are very good at it, some not so good but they will use it if not 100% toilet but for hay and as their bed.
     
  9. Oct 8, 2019 #29

    JetFalcon

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    Well, this morning I saw both the bunnies out of the cage. Because I let my bunny free roam the balcony, so I leave the first level door open so she can go back in. But somehow, these two got out, but the barely can walk, and that was like a large distance for them to walk out. So is it possible the mom took them out? Because they always seem to only wanna stay in their nest, they didn't really like coming out.

    But the brown / white was out on the floor, so I found it right away. Then I checked the nest and realized the 2nd orange one was gone too. And it took me 5 minutes to find it, but I was panicking because the baby was not in its nest and no-where in the cage. I looked around, found beside a broom bucket thing, it was seriously hidden away well I had to move things around because I know bunnies like wedging themselves in super hard to see places.

    Thankfully I found both of them outside the cage, so I locked the cage now with the mom inside, in hopes I can find out if she really tried taking them out.
     
  10. Oct 8, 2019 #30

    zupper

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    When mother jumps out nestbox after nursing she can pull kits on her tits for that reason nestbox has to be high enough and I can't copy&paste photo but here in this link you can see a piece of wood added to prevent this.
    https://www.clarkswoodwork.com/rabbit-nesting-boxes-now-available/

    If you want your kits to live you should keep them safe, maybe you can close the door after her or something. They are extremely vulnerable and can die any minute so you are in charge there. Maybe she can stay in while nursing or just let her out for day and lock in for night. I don't know what is your setup and your nestbox.
     
  11. Oct 8, 2019 #31

    JetFalcon

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    [​IMG]
    Right now, I just put all the fur / newspaper shreds in a box so they are contained.

    So the kits will still be sucking and she will just drag them while sucking on her tits?

    I locked the mom in the cage for today, just so I can figure out what happened. I was gonna freak out if I couldn't find the 2nd baby and 30-60 minutes had passed.

    Maybe I can do what you said, like lock her up during a certain time, and let her out when its day time?

    Right now, I just put all the fur / newspaper shreds in a box so they are contained. Just a normal cardboard box about 3 inches high. Should I improvise some kind of lip like on this box? How does that prevent the babies from coming out w/ the mom?
     
  12. Oct 8, 2019 #32

    zupper

    zupper

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    Yes.

    Well I am taking mother out and placing into a playpen or I have a large dog crate high use it as a playroom sometimes, they all love it even more than playpen. So she can have a few hours for herself. Because when kits open eyes and they can chase her trying to get some milk, poor mother has no time to sleep they get her everywhere. So I just put her into another place and she can sleep, eat, play, dig, whatever she wants and when she wants to go back she tells me or it's easy I know she will feed them around midnight so I open the door and she runs back and she's so happy and relaxed, starts nursing immediately I think it is good that she has her time because it is really tiring when 6 kits won't let you sleep a minute, even high shelf won't help they learn how to get there really quickly so poor girl has no escape at all.

    I don't know if she's a free-roam if she'll want to stay caged but generally she'd need to eat and sleep more while nursing maybe I am wrong, you know your rabbit better just make sure kits are locked and I'd like them to stay in their nest box if they are still one week old for another week or two. I don't see your situation you know better and decide
     
  13. Oct 9, 2019 #33

    zupper

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    But what works for me not necessary works for you maybe other people here will tell you I am doing wrong, but I just know my rabbits well and trying to be flexible and find suitable solution, it can be different for different rabbits, so just look at your cage look at your nest look at your rabbits analyze your situation and think a little bit and you will find your own solution
     
  14. Oct 9, 2019 #34

    zupper

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    You can put your nestbox into another bigger cardboard box so she can't jump out quickly she will need to step into that bigger box. This also prevents her from stepping on them, well there's often another piece of wood added from another side so she can't jump in full force and kits kinda protected under that little roof. Google nestbox and you will see more examples
     
  15. Oct 9, 2019 #35

    CharlieRae

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    dont introduce them to kids/park until weaned. Also, dont let your bunnies eat the vegetation at parks. They spray pesticides & weed killers, it could make your rabbits very sick. Mama bunnies dont hang out with their babies, they feed them 2x a day & thats it. I start to sprinkle bunny pellets in the next box at 2 weeks old. They will nibble on the pellets. Also, change the nesting material completely when they open their eyes so its nice & clean. Save the clean fur mom pulled & give them fresh hay to burrow into.
     
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  16. Oct 9, 2019 #36

    zupper

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    Wouldn't say that's it, she also cleans them, stimulates they start peeing and teaches them to stay safe from humans and other potential predators, she can even punish them when not listening or going into unsafe places, well that's depending on mother of course and her own experience with humans, some rabbit mothers are overprotective
     
  17. Oct 9, 2019 #37

    JetFalcon

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    8D40F0E7-DD0F-42B3-BB74-AEB9B4B58AC4.jpeg EEA27E5E-198D-402F-B2F5-2A2A20B7BCC0.jpeg 01BD15A9-EA80-419A-8931-ED998DEC3E6C.jpeg

    Here is my solution to keep the babies inside the cage. I made a higher wall for the nest box so only the mom can jump over.

    And also another plastic wall at the exit of the cage in case they did get out. With two barriers they really must want to keep sucking on their mom.



    So two barriers where only adult bunnies can jump over, but baby bunnies couldn't jump over.
     
    Last edited: Oct 9, 2019
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  18. Oct 11, 2019 #38

    zupper

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    This should work for another week or two I would also keep the 2nd floor door closed. What a beautiful house they have there and they look so good, fat and big, they are lucky getting more milk than if they were 6.
    Keep us updated :)
     
  19. Oct 11, 2019 #39

    JetFalcon

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    2nd floor is always closed, was open for the photo. But it’s been a few days and they been staying inside their nest box and I can keep the bottom door open so the parents can access the balcony.

    and my smallest bunny (the mom) is able to hop over the barrier.

    I’ve been petting them and being around them. I put them in a plastic box with towel and watch TV / play video games with them. And they are so cute to hold.
     
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  20. Oct 12, 2019 #40

    JetFalcon

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    One of the baby bunnies died, the brown / white one. :(

    It's even more sad because I was predicting about the future and how it look like when it growed up. And it was just a baby, barely got to live.

    Last night, he was doing fine, I took both the babies out to hang out in a tiny box. I put them back in their nest and went to sleep. Woke up in morning, saw they both got out their nest box again, except the brown / white one was on its side like it couldn't crawl. I was about to take him to the vet, but he was already dead when I was ready to take him. I don't think the vet could have done much if he died within 6 hours.
     

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