Just found out my baby is 6 weeks old?

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Toniwisbey

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Hi Iv just had a baby rabbit and now were home Iv just found out that she is only 6 weeks old? , initially been told they were 8 weeks, the mother has just given birth to another litter so I think that’s why she wanted to get rid of this litter 😢 now I’m just after some advise as to what I need to do now feeding wise ? I won’t take her back as she will only be given to someone else but I want to try and give her the best start. I have brought alfalfa hey and pellets but I’m not sure if there is anything else she will be needing also xxx
 

JBun

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Being very careful with the diet and minimizing stress are the most important things with a newly weaned rabbit. With new baby rabbits it's important to always stick with the exact same food they are used to and what their gut is used to, provided the diet isn't causing serious digestive illness. So you want to be feeding the exact same type and brand of pellets, the same hay, the same foods, except for any sugary high starch treats. Those should be eliminated completely to minimize the chances of gut upset occurring.

Baby rabbit diet

Then minimizing things that stress the baby, giving it time to settle in and get used to it's new home. If it's a really nervy bun, no handling unless absolutely necessary, providing a calm quite area that doesn't stress it, providing hidey holes. If it seems to be well adapted, curious, and comfortable with people, then you don't have to worry so much about it having trouble settling in, but be mindful of things that might seem to stress the baby at all.

If the baby wasn't used to alfalfa hay in it's previous home, I wouldn't feed the alfalfa hay and would stick with whatever grass hay it was fed there. If it was fed alfalfa hay in it's previous home, I would also offer some type of grass hay in addition to the alfalfa, then in a couple of weeks gradually start fazing out the alfalfa hay. If the baby is already getting an alfalfa based pellet, my opinion is there's no need for it to also have alfalfa hay. It can make for too rich of a diet leading to excess cecotropes and possibly bladder issues(excess calcium), and also can make for a very picky bun that doesn't want to transition to a grass hay when it becomes an adult and no longer should have alfalfa.

In a couple of weeks if the baby is doing well, then I would start slowly transitioning it onto whatever type of healthy junior pellet you intend to normally feed. And after the pellet transition, usually leafy greens can be very slowly and gradually tested out(unless the baby is sensitive and having issues), starting with a very small amount and one at a time if there or no signs of digestive upset.

 
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Toniwisbey

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Being very careful with the diet and minimizing stress are the most important things with a newly weaned rabbit. With new baby rabbits it's important to always stick with the exact same food they are used to and what their gut is used to, provided the diet isn't causing serious digestive illness. So you want to be feeding the exact same type and brand of pellets, the same hay, the same foods, except for any sugary high starch treats. Those should be eliminated completely to minimize the chances of gut upset occurring.

Baby rabbit diet

Then minimizing things that stress the baby, giving it time to settle in and get used to it's new home. If it's a really nervy bun, no handling unless absolutely necessary, providing a calm quite area that doesn't stress it, providing hidey holes. If it seems to be well adapted, curious, and comfortable with people, then you don't have to worry so much about it having trouble settling in, but be mindful of things that might seem to stress the baby at all.

If the baby wasn't used to alfalfa hay in it's previous home, I wouldn't feed the alfalfa hay and would stick with whatever grass hay it was fed there. If it was fed alfalfa hay in it's previous home, I would also offer some type of grass hay in addition to the alfalfa, then in a couple of weeks gradually start fazing out the alfalfa hay. If the baby is already getting an alfalfa based pellet, my opinion is there's no need for it to also have alfalfa hay. It can make for too rich of a diet leading to excess cecotropes and possibly bladder issues(excess calcium), and also can make for a very picky bun that doesn't want to transition to a grass hay when it becomes an adult and no longer should have alfalfa.

In a couple of weeks if the baby is doing well, then I would start slowly transitioning it onto whatever type of healthy junior pellet you intend to normally feed. And after the pellet transition, usually leafy greens can be very slowly and gradually tested out(unless the baby is sensitive and having issues), starting with a very small amount and one at a time if there or no signs of digestive upset.

Thank you so much this is the food she was eating so I will get this in the morning so she has the same, and she was just eating hay not sure which 1 ? should I just give some of the hay I already have for my other bunny or not give any for a couple of days ? I feel so sad for the mother having another lot of babies so soon 😢 it’s sad, I wouldn’t of had her if I had known but now she’s hear I could never give her back xxx
 

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JBun

Jenny - Health & Wellness Mod
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If you have a good grass hay for your other rabbit, that's what I would give. It doesn't matter that it's the exact same grass hay the baby had before. Any variety of grass hay is good and rarely causes digestive issues when changed or suddenly introduced into a rabbits diet. In fact grass hays usually correct digestive problems. The only times I've heard of grass hay causing issues is if it was bad from mold, had noxious weeds in it, was a young soft leafy early growth grass hay that was too rich, or a grain hay like oat with too many seed heads and thus a lot of carbs.

On the other hand, if they aren't used to alfalfa hay, I've seen it lead to gut upset when a lot is suddenly introduced, so better to not risk it if she isn't used to eating alfalfa hay. Though I would check to make sure she is eating the grass hay well. If she isn't used to eating grass hay or the particular kind you feed, she may be reluctant to try it. And it's essential she is eating at least something. If she won't touch the grass hay, then it may be necessary to continue feeding your current pellets until you are able to get the ones she was being fed before.
 

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