It is ok to use a spray bottle to punish?

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My bun has been testing my patience a lot over the past few days, he is allowed out all of the time of a day time and ideally I want him to be in his hutch (indoors in my room) of a night time because there are possible dangers for him in my room when I am not able to observe him.

The moment I put him back into his cage he rattles the bars like crazy getting louder and louder. I have tried to ignore this - one time up to 20 minutes but he is persistent until I let him out and I am worried also about waking everyone in the house up. I end up getting really frustrated and letting him roam my room of a night time - I am just worried in case he eats the wires off my TV or something. I have also tried clapping but this does nothing at all.

I am a full time college student so being woken up several times a night isn't helping I am so close to surrendering him to a rescue center if I can't control his disruptive behavior. Someone mentioned you can use a spray bottle as an effective punishment to stop this, is that ok?
 

Paddy Ohara

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I used one when we were going through the terrible 2's and it worked really well. It did not take her long to figure out what it was just a few uses. Then all I had to do was pick it up without using it and she would do the right thing. I was always careful to avoid the ears. I do not have to use it anymore at all because she responds to voice and hand cues/ commands. Just make sure your timing and the behvior are very accurate so they know what they are being punishe for, timing is essential.
 

BertNErnie

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I currently use a spray bottle with mine and dont see anything wrong with it, it don't hurt them just distracts them so they have to stop and wash.
 

LakeCondo

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Yes. It's not a punishment, but a distraction. You might also weave pieces of cardboard around the cage bars to try to stop his noise. Do one bar uncovered to 2 or 3 covered, to have maximum covered.
 

SOOOSKA

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I thought Guslived inthe bathroom?

Is you bunny fixed? That would probably help alot? Also does he have toys to chew on. I just recently bought some Oxbow toys, OMG they are great toys.

Susan:)
 

tamsin

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You can use one, it's no worse than rain. I think it's unlikely that it will work though. Distracting a rabbit temporarily isn't very effective unless you don't mind waking up every half hour to apply the distraction ;)

I think you need to think about things from his point of view. He's used to having free access all day so the room is his territory, then at night (a time when bunnies are often most active) you've restrict his access to his own territory. As a rabbit, his natural reaction is to try and get that access back by breaking out. He's mad and frustrated and bored.

If you want to stop his rattling you need to address the underlying issues he has. Training him not to show those feelings (which you're unlikely to manage anyway) won't make them go away.

First, is it possible to bunny proof completely, if not, is it possible to give him part of the area - for example attaching a pen to the cage at night to give him more space without completely free range?

Plan out what you expect him to do during the night instead of rattle the bars... Remember this is a rabbits active period. He needs something to occupy himself. I'd suggest timing feeding so it's just before you go to bed, also making sure that eating is going to take hours by incorporating the food into activities. Also you could make available extra toys over night, and take them away in the morning so they stay more novel.

Hope that helps :)
 
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tamsin wrote:
You can use one, it's no worse than rain. I think it's unlikely that it will work though. Distracting a rabbit temporarily isn't very effective unless you don't mind waking up every half hour to apply the distraction ;)

I think you need to think about things from his point of view. He's used to having free access all day so the room is his territory, then at night (a time when bunnies are often most active) you've restrict his access to his own territory. As a rabbit, his natural reaction is to try and get that access back by breaking out. He's mad and frustrated and bored.

If you want to stop his rattling you need to address the underlying issues he has. Training him not to show those feelings (which you're unlikely to manage anyway) won't make them go away.

First, is it possible to bunny proof completely, if not, is it possible to give him part of the area - for example attaching a pen to the cage at night to give him more space without completely free range?

Plan out what you expect him to do during the night instead of rattle the bars... Remember this is a rabbits active period. He needs something to occupy himself. I'd suggest timing feeding so it's just before you go to bed, also making sure that eating is going to take hours by incorporating the food into activities. Also you could make available extra toys over night, and take them away in the morning so they stay more novel.

Hope that helps :)

At the moment my room isn't COMPLETELY bunny proof, I have obstacles in the way of areas that contain wires but I'm sure if he is left to his own devices for long enough then he will figure out how to get behind I just don't want him hurting himself while I'm asleep. I am going to buy a whole bunch of wire guards tomorrow along with some mesh wire to put in the inside of his cage for when he does actually need to go inside (while I do some work) but ideally I want him to be able to sleep through the night in his hutch so I will work on making it more interesting for him before I turn in for the night.

As for neutering he is coming up to being 3 months old so I can probably get this done soon.

Somebody suggested putting a blanket over the front of the cage too so he can't see me but I can't see this helping the problem at all?
 

MagPie

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I haven't had much of a problem with cage rattle since Harvey's neuter. But when he was I tried the towel/blanket over his cage. Well that just made him mad which made him start thumping. I ended up just putting in ear plugs.
 

piperknitsRN

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Bunnies are very determined little buggers. While my bunnies are fairly good about being quiet (unless they have something in their X pen to tear or shred), I used to own a Holland lop named Flip Flop who thought it was great fun to throw her litterbox around and rattle her cage bars at all hours of the night and early morning. Is there any way you can place his cage in another part of the house while you sleep?
 

MiniLopHop

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I gave up on using a cage. Now Becky and Gary have the bedroom all the time. Houdini and Cindi have my office all the time. The four don't get along on home turf so we put baby gates in the door ways to keep them contained. I guess that space is enough that they are content and no more bar rattling. I found that their will is stronger than mine :)

Not that I'm bunny whipped or anything ;)
 

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