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Is 'small pet select' hay really worth it?

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gelliebean

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I've been buying 10lb boxes of SPS for $45 CAD. A feed store close to me sells a grass mix for $14.75 CAD for 60lbs.

I'll probably continue to buy "treat" hays like oat for example.
 

Mariam+Theo

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I have never bought SPS hay, but I wouldn't think it is worth it. Actually, I think that hay from the feed store is a better option since it is cheaper and there is more hay. Hay from feed stores is super high quality because that is what people feed their horses (most people are super picky about what they feed their horses). As long as the hay isn't dusty and doesn't smell weird it is a great option.
 

gelliebean

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I have never bought SPS hay, but I wouldn't think it is worth it. Actually, I think that hay from the feed store is a better option since it is cheaper and there is more hay. Hay from feed stores is super high quality because that is what people feed their horses (most people are super picky about what they feed their horses). As long as the hay isn't dusty and doesn't smell weird it is a great option.
The only reason I wanted to buy SPS is because they are the only brand I see that offers first, second, and third cut. I wanted third cut for my rabbit because it's supposed to help them gain weight. She also tends to switch her preferences for stalky or soft hay. Loved her second cut timothy but after her spay she only wanted soft things so I bought her orchard grass.
 

Mariam+Theo

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The only reason I wanted to buy SPS is because they are the only brand I see that offers first, second, and third cut. I wanted third cut for my rabbit because it's supposed to help them gain weight. She also tends to switch her preferences for stalky or soft hay. Loved her second cut timothy but after her spay she only wanted soft things so I bought her orchard grass.
I understand that, they are definitely a well-known brand and have lots of hay options. I get bales from our feed store and have found that the bales are normally a mixture of different cuts of hay. So I can swap it up for Theo every so often.
 

overhear

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I don't know if there are documented cases of rabbits contracting RHDV2 from food, but I found this statement on the Oxbow website reassuring. That said, at some point they will be marketing more recently grown hay.
Oxbow Animal Health

Should I be worried about my rabbits contracting RHDV2 from the hay I purchase?
The risk of your rabbits contracting RHDV2 from the hay you purchase from a trusted manufacturer are very low. Unlike other potential sources, a trusted manufacturer will be much more likely to have the appropriate quality and safety measures in place to ensure the best practices to keep any transmission risk as low as possible. While RHD can be transmitted via fomite (non-living objects), this transmission would require the presence of an infected animal in a hay field, as well as specific environmental conditions which supported the stability of the virus.

What is Oxbow doing to ensure your products are safe?
From a product perspective, please know that all Oxbow hay currently in the marketplace is from the 2019 growing season. As we mentioned, current estimates from the USDA indicate that RHDV2 could theoretically remain viable on a carrier for up to 3 months under ideal environmental conditions. Looking at the timing of the recently confirmed cases, we can assure you that no Oxbow hay in the marketplace is currently at risk for carrying RHDV2.

The veterinary and public health communities are working diligently to expand our understanding about RHDV2. In the meantime, it is our responsibility to use the best and most complete information available to make recommendations when it comes to helping pet parents protect their pets. Based on the available information, please know that the transmission of RHDV2 from a packaged product such as hay or food remains exceedingly unlikely, even with rabbits from native populations testing positive. While RHDV2 can be transmitted via fomite (i.e. non-living objects), this transmission would require a number of specific and unlikely circumstances for the virus to be present and remain stable.

Even with the extremely low risk, we will continue to practice extreme caution when it comes to product safety regarding RHDV2. As we look to the future, we are currently evaluating additional safeguards to ensure that all of the hay we source in the coming months has been processed in a manner that minimizes the chance of Oxbow hay carrying RHDV2 to the greatest degree possible.
 
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