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Is she pregnant?

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Heather&poppy

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Ok, im new to this so first of all hello to everyone 😊. I have a female rabbit. When i got her i got her with a companion whom i was told was also a female, turned out they were wrong lol and it was in fact an entire male. They'd obviously been living together for some time before i knew he was a male and id never seen any hanky panky type behaviour but separated them anyway. My female has been in her own cage since the 10th july, after being in her cage alone for around 2weeks she started to display behaviour that would normally be displayed by a pregnant female. She was eating more, and now does not like to be picked up, she geta grumpy if you try. She was collecting hay and nesr building and has even lined the nest with her fur. She has completed her nest and left it and now is laying down alot. However she doesn't look very fat. Could it be a phantom pregnancy??
 

Apollo’s Slave

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It could be a false pregnancy but due to the circumstances, I would get prepared for some kits. Have you given her a nest box? If so, I would reccomend that you do that, and then just wait it out. Try not to bother her too much. If it’s a false pregnancy, she’ll get to a point where she realised that she’s not pregnant and then will go back to normal, as if nothing had happened. If it is a real pregnancy, I’d expect some kits very soon. Breeding Rabbits: All about rabbits breeding, conception to weaning
 

Preitler

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My guess too is that she's actually pregnant, and that she'll kindle within hours or a few days, be prepared. More often than not they don't pull fur with a false pregnancy, lying around and eating a lot are signs too.
 

Heather&poppy

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Thank you both i appreciate it 😊, shes abit grumpier today, doesnt even want me to pet her head, i think she was more just tolerating it haha bless her,
She doesn't have a nest box but she does have a separate compartment which is where she sleeps 😊
 

zuppa

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Hi, how old is she and your other rabbit too?
It could be a fake pregnancy they do pull lots of fur as well but in your situation and if she's older than 5 months it is very likely that she will have babies before 10th of August because they were separated 10th July. It means she can have them today or tomorrow as well so it would be wise to give her a nestbox and make sure she has plenty of food (should be high protein 16% junior pellets unlimited) and more hay and she will drink a lot when it all starts so make sure there's lots of water for her.
 

Heather&poppy

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Im not sure to be honest shes young but not a baby, id say around the 6mnths mark maybe I'm not 100% sure, why does she need a nest box though? She has made a next herself so i assume she'd use that if she is due to have babies 😊
 

Preitler

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A nestbox helps to keep the kits in, if they wander off or get dragged out on the teat they and don't find back they can die. It also gives the doe some peace until they are really ready to leave the nest. I would put the nest in as it is and put it in the same spot.

The youngest doe I had that got pregnant was about 15 weeks, and that's not a small breed. Your doe is old enough for a first litter, definitly not too young.
 

Preitler

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I would put the nest in the box as it is, and maybe show her, like putting her in the box and dunkin her nose into the nest. I do that when I have to transfer a nest with kits to the hutch. But apart from that i would give her food, rest and privacy. Or, you could just put a low (ca. 10cm) cardboard wall around the nest, big enough for the doe to lie in.
As little stress as possible, just a peek every other hour to not miss her kindling, when she's done check for any kits outside the nest, and remove soiled, wet stuff from the nest, short check on the kits, and then leave them alone, well covered with fur for a day, until she fed them (can take 24h, sometimes even longer for the milk to drop). No messing, picture taking, or unnecessary handling of doe or kits. No stress.
 
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