Is my rabbit pregnant?

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Preitler

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I had a doe get pregnant with 14 weeks this year, I didn't notice it until 6 weeks later when 6 more rabbits were hopping through that hutch. I very rarly see any movement of kits, most times I can'tr even tell for sure if she's pregnant.
Over the years, this was the 3rd young doe that accidentially got pregnent, they all did fine.

Breeding is what rabbits evolved for, that's what they excell at, producing high numbers fast. So, a pregnant rabbit isn't really a reason to see the vet as long as everything is normal. That high reproductiion rate also compensates for quite some losses, sometimes there can be problems, and sometimes first timers have some problems doing everything right in time and in the right order.
Also, spaying a pet rabbit is a good idea, those false pregnancys and hormonal swings can be a bother, apart from that they get actually pregnant at every opportunity.

So, I would avoid stressing her, give her a nestbox, lots of hay and when the time comes (mine lose some appetite 1-2 days prior kindling) would check at least every 2 hours, in case something goes wrong like kits being outside the nestbox.
I also give pregnant does extra garden time to hop around and dig, since in my opinion it's good when they get some exercise.
 
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Update. I'm thinking she ate the babies because I came home late one night and didnt get to check her till the morning and she was no longer fat and she had a nest but no babies :(
 

JBun

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That would only happen if the babies were not alive when they were born or died shortly after being born, and she was following instinct by cleaning up so as to not attract predators.
 

Reese_loves_her_bun

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So I got a rex rabbit back in August and I've had her in a cage with a slightly older buck. Well I noticed here recently that she had started getting a round stomach and didnt seem to want to be touched so I didnt get her out of the cage for awhile. Well yesterday I decided to get her out and her stomach is HUGE and pretty tight feeling. Shes probably at exactly 3 months old and I palpated her and I think I felt something but I'm not sure. Shes developing extra fur (not a dewlap but actual fur) on her chest, legs, sides, and stomach. I dont think I have seen any movement of babies so I'm not sure if she is pregnant? I sent a few pictures to a friend who breeds rabbits and she said it looks like she very well could be pregnant. Any answers?
I would help her with the nest and watch over her. Sometimes when rabbits are to young (as in 6 months or younger) they are not fully capable of taking care of their babies. If she succeeds in having the babies make sure their bellies are always full because your bunny might not know how to feed them. Definitely in the future do not put males with females at any age because unwanted babies/dead babies happen when you do that.
 

Bam Bam

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All my prayers that everything will go well.
We had a bunny in our rescue that the vet said she wasn’t pregnant but I noticed her pulling hair from her dewlap and made the cutest nest. All her babies did well. It took us an hour one day because when the bunnies were old enough we didn’t realize they could fit through the bars of the pen.
I know nothing about breeding but I always think cute stories help. Lol
Please send pics.
 

woahlookitsme

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I'm breeding her again. So hopefully things will go as planned.
Did you already breed her? She’s only four months old at this point I would strongly suggest waiting until at least 6mos of age before breeding her. Young rabbits need to mature sexually yes but more important mentally. If you are breeding her so young you are setting her up to fail as a mother
 

TreasuredFriend

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This is so sad. Be prepared to get all the babes spayed and neutered from your pocketbook. As savvy individuals know, there are high-vol shelters that routinely euthanize the overpopulation of domestic pets; like domestic cats. Rabbits get the shaft as rescues are overloaded also; how well we know and then uncaring people abandon these pets. So I know a lady who's taken in 15 cats and I don't think she intends to breed them as she also is well aware of lifetime costs and how quickly unaltered pets and animals reproduce. The right action would be to think of the young lady you acquired and provide her with a lifetime of love - instead of delivering litter after litter -- with documented info on uterine cancer and the ongoing euthanization rates at shelters; humans are not devoted to helping and preventing the overpopulation of pets. Volunteer or foster at a reputable organization.
Yup, we took in a litter that was due to be euth'd at local shelter. Mom was only 5 months old when impregnated by somebun and folks at the horse farm. Excellent to not subvert to the excuse that rabbits need to breed (that's old school when you are spending time at an animal shelter and see the unwanted pets euth'd) - same goes for cats and horses and any animal or pet - laughing here because hopefully humans know what cause pregnancies to occur also.
 

TreasuredFriend

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As a foster mom taking in a large female from an abuse/hoarding case, a savvy bun person informed me/us to remove her to a quiet area of our home. Stress can make a female cannibalize her youngsters; that is why shelters are so in need of fosterers and caring individuals to remove pregnant females from the stress of shelter environment; barking pets, traffic, et al. Was the reason several females came into our home!
 

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