Illness and Ailments of Rabbits

Discussion in 'Health & Wellness' started by FreddysMom, Dec 7, 2005.

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  1. Dec 7, 2005 #1

    FreddysMom

    FreddysMom

    FreddysMom

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    Okay so in lieu of the several injuries, sickness etc. that we have all read about on the board, I think it would be great for everyone to make a post about any medical problems they have encountered with their rabbit(s).

    I know it's possible to go searching for everything in the archives, but when you are in a rush, you don't want to sift through so many threads and I think it would serve as a great reference guide for those that aren't able to finda great rabbit savvy vet. By looking at the issue someone else had and its outcome they could suggest the same treatment to their vet.

    So anyone who's rabbit(s) has encountered a problem, please list:

    what theproblem was

    how it happened (if possible to someone else could avoid the same situation)

    how long recovery took

    method(s)of treatment

    any side affects of treat

    and anything else you feel is important to add


     
  2. Dec 7, 2005 #2

    FreddysMom

    FreddysMom

    FreddysMom

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    I'll be the first to start with Freddy's chocolate fiasco

    Freddy ingested about 4oz of milk chocolate

    he did not show any signs of poisoning, such as rapid breathing or confusion

    they did bloodwork to find out the actual toxicity levels in his body

    He was treated with activated charcoal, sub Q fluids

    spent over night in animal hospital for evaluation

    went to my vet in the AM where he received another evalution and another subQ fluid shot

    instructions were to observe him for three days because that is how long it takes for the chocolate in the body to be at levels no longer considered poisonous.

    Dark chocolate, bitter chocolate is the most poisonous

    bitter-sweet, milk chocolate is still poisonous but less that dark

    white chocolate is least poisonous of the three
     
  3. Dec 7, 2005 #3

    naturestee

    naturestee

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    Great idea!

    I'd like to bring up the side effects Fey had from her meds.When Mocha ripped Fey's stomach open, the emergency vet stitched her up and gave us four days worth of Meloxicam (painreliever/anti-inflammatory) to be given once a day and a week worth of Baytril (very common antibiotic) to be given twice a day. Fey was okay with her meds at first, but soon developed problems with the Meloxicam. After her daily dose, she would not poop and would hardly touch her food for 10-12 hours. I stopped that early. My regular vet said that this side effect is not unusual, which is why he usually only treats pain in rabbits for thefirst day or two and then withholds painkillers unless the rabbit does much better on them. I had mainly heard of the need for continued pain treatment in rabbits, not the severe side effects that painkillers can cause in them.

    The Baytril was okay for longer, but Fey started to get slightly mushy poops before she had her last dose (last Thursday). It got worse over the weekend. She started having occasional mucous-covered poops and some liquid feces. I removed all veggies and treats (except for a little oats). My vet said that there's not a whole lot to be done, but advised to feed her small amounts of dark leafy greens. He did not want to give a probiotic as there are none with bacteria that are native to rabbit intestines and because she reacted badly to her previous meds. She is improving- no mucous, no liquid poops.They're still mushy but it'll just take time.

    Fey is healing well even though she did take one of her scabs off this weekend. It will be two weeks since her accident tomorrow. She is confined to a small petstore cage so she doesn't rip her stitches out and has paper towels for litter to prevent stuff from sticking to her wounds.
     
  4. Dec 7, 2005 #4

    Guest

    I will pull up the post on Cowboy and post it here in a different reply ,
    First I want to address the probiotics that Naturestee brought up .

    I don't understand Probiotics not being Native to a rabbits system , ? does this meanprobiotics are not Native to other Animal systems ?

    When Cowboy was first brought into the vets office and put on his first round of baytrillthey told me to adminProbiotics with it to keep theflora that the antibiotics would destroy? also the probiotics would lessen the chance of stomach ulsers ? I don't think I understand where your vet isgoing with this ?
     
  5. Dec 7, 2005 #5

    Guest

    I have had the most interesting week with a Jersy Wooly , I amhalf crazy trying to figure this little guy out , I have also managed to stumpnot One butThree Vets !.

    Cowboy , My Jersy Buck , Is / was/ is in stasis , fur block , or something , He has been to Two Vets both whom deal with Rabbits on a constant basis, And PGG asked her Vet if he has ever come across a situation such as this . Here's how it all started.

    Monday Morning I did my usualrounds feeding and watering everyone who needed food and water , gave everyonethe once over checks . Everyone was fine and dandy ,

    Monday Night I go down for the Nightly rounds of feeding and watering ,hay and treats . as I am walking byCowboys cage , I get this weirdchill that something wasn't right .He was siting in an odd spot , one hewould never normally sit in . On closer inspectionI noticed he hadn't touched his water nor food frommorning , This is very odd for him, he has a good healthy appetite . I pulled him out and he was like a rag doll, I checked his eyes and they were very dry , not shinyand sparkly as is normal .

    I yelled to my husband to finish feeding and watering, I was taking him tothe house , I stuffed him in my coat and ran up , Upon getting in hereI located syringes and pumpkin , warmed water , nutrical and theclippers , in that order . brought him to the desk with everything in tow and proceeded to force water intake , when I felt he couldn't take anymore water I started with the pumpkin .when that was finished and I felt better about this in went the nutrical, and out came the clippers ,Coming from the garage to the house islike coming in from the North Poleto Florida weather on a constant basis ,the Fur had to go .

    Tuesday : He wasn't any better but would take the pumpkin , nutrical , water melon juice and a few pieces of melon by him self . nothing major but he was making theeffort. I wasn't satisfied so called an ER vet and ran him in , She agreed he had a wool block but it was high in his stomach as apposed to lower bowel or colon .She then SubQ'd him and sent him home with Baytril tabs , and a very worried Mom and Shadow . I honestly didnt believe for a minute he was going to pull out of this , he was as far as the Vet wasconcerned too far gone . death was imminant,ok so much for that thought , Thankfully,

    Cowboy was back to the Vets today , He isnt pooping and it has been 8 days now . I have driven most everyone crazy trying to help me figure this out , The Vet didn't Sub Q this time as she felt he was fully hydrated and it would be unecessary , but his x-rays and Ultra sound on his Lower GI tract , NOTHING there , No wool block , no signs of stasis , he is basically clean as a whistle! I have to mention there was no signs of fecal matter in there also . She has also done fecal sample for parasites and foreign matter , nothing is there ,culture should be back in a week or two .She also drew off blood for a blood work up. again a waiting game .

    A little while ago Cassi found 3 small poops I know could only have come from him , I purposly put him on a white rug with his cage tobe able to monitor should he decide to poop. there was nothing previous totonight . He is Peeing up a storm thankfully , so Peeing isn't an issue .

    We have explored all options of where the Poop is ,has gone , etc . there is no logicalexplanations, we have managed to come up with some pretty far fetched ideas , such asProjectile pooping , he is reingesting them so on and so forth , nothingmakes sense ,, There is no Cecal matter on his feet Butt or tail , nothing on the wires nothing in his litter tray either .

    My Question is does anyone have any ideas as to what can be going on with him, wheres the poop ? what more to do for him ? Its been 8 days with only 3 little poops, How long can this go on , I must mention , he is active, runs all around his cage, the house ,eats every treat type food I give him , including Parsley and Mint water , He hatesPineapple and pineapple water . Heboots the tube when I feedand give water , nips me hard, and is generally all around acting NOT sick , while I know he still is ,.
    We did think of that and even double-checked then checked again , surely there would be some evidence , evenone cecal pop somewhere , there is no way I believe nor thevet that he couldconsume every piece , and leave no evidence. Unfortunately there was very little matter onthe probe to even get a goodsample , so sheis working withwhat they have and hoping it is enough .

    The vet wouldn't put him on reglan because of where the block was , ( in his stomach on Monday) she was afraid of exploding his stomach, or it moving down and tearing his intestines , Ialso asked about an enema andshe said No it was too high up for it to be effective , and yes theydid ultra sound his stomach ,there is nothing for a block in there now.

    I have been giving him 8 in 1 hairball treatment for 3 days now , it isn''t petrolium based, its mineral oil based , so safe to use for rabbits , I did ask theVets opinion on it first , before purchasing it ,just to be safe , It is in fact safe to use on rabbits , and he likes it betterthan Nutrical , and I don't have an allergic reaction to it if I forget my gloves .

    I don't think I would ever give a rabbit in stasis a Laxative , I certainly wouldnt want to cause it more pain than it would already be in ,and the chance of severedehydration scares the hell out of me , especially if they are already dehydrated to start with . Laxatives would be a very at the end oflife decision to make , not one for this instance.
    Back from yet another trip to the Vets, The new Vet gave him a Gut Mobility shot and he did poop a bit on the carrier on the way home , took us over an hour to get home because of thingsneeded doing . So this is a good sign ,She also gave me a mobility table togive him once a day , The meds begin with an R and I dont have the paper in front of me at the moment .

    For the moment he is sitting inhis cage glaring at me and rubbing his Butt , poor baby there isnt much meat backthere at the moment .She also said to go ahead andfeed what ever the little non poop will eat, at this point she isn'tconcerned with sugars because of weight loss , His hydration level was highenough today to again not warrent Sub Q' . She fully expects with a day or few hewill be pooping up a storm and will be out of the woods . But to keep a very close eye to him to be sure he doesnt go into a molt frombeing removed from onetemperature to a different one. I do believe we will avoid all this with another hair clipping .

    She still can not explain wherethe mass went to nor if it will return , but to not worry much on it nowthat its gone , she was able tofeel tiny poops in there but high up inthe upper intestines.

    Here a question was asked if the medication was reglan , to which the reply was :

    YesAngie that's what she sent him home with but the Injection was the one that Starlight suggested, she wanted him to motivatequickly , She asked if I wanted injectibles or Pills , I opted for pills because he is so darned tiny , Injections on bigger rabbits I reallydont squeem over and I have injected many horses and cows but a 2lb rabbit scared me to death even thinking about injecting . I was terrified should he move that there wasnt enough rabbit between the needle andsomething vital . nopedefinitely Pills for him wasthe way to go .


     
  6. Dec 7, 2005 #6

    m.e.

    m.e.

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    gypsy wrote:
    Actually, there is a good possibility that the bacteria in probiotics are not the same as the bacteria naturally found in a rabbit's gut. Not knowing what forms of bacteria are commonly found in rabbit intestines, I can't speak conclusively about that, but I do know that most probiotics are made for humans (andthere are different probiotics for the large and small intestines, as well as different forms of bacteria you can take). I would venture a guess to very few are specifically made for rabbits.

    If you're simply talking about adding probiotics to an otherwise healthy rabbit's diet, I would not recommend it. Probiotics throw off the balance in the gut for a good couple days;when starting on probiotics, many peopleexperience digestive...issues ;)I don't know that it would be such a good idea to do that to an animal that is not experiencing any problems,as it could bring onan upset stomach and/or diarrhea. There is also a fine balance to taking probiotics;people areusuallytold to take them for no more than 8-10 weeks, at which point their bodies should be regulated again.

    Even inthe case of arabbit whose intestinal flora are beingwiped out by an antibiotic,I'mnot sureif a probiotic wouldreally be helpful to them. Antibiotics are usually short term, and afterwards, their naturally bacteria will reflourish. If the natural bacteria has to compete with the foreign bacteria from the probiotics, are we setting the rabbit up for more complications? I don't know.

    I'm just basing this on my research of probiotics prior to our trip to Africa, which does bring up another point: probiotics are incredibly sensitive, and most probiotics that are widely available in stores are completely useless. The bacteria within them are very sensitive, need to be protected from light, often refrigerated, and be in a form that ensures they won't be killed off by stomach acid before they reachthe intestine. Just some more food for thought...

    ~Emily and the Fuzzbutts~
     
  7. Dec 7, 2005 #7

    dajeti2

    dajeti2

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    I will add Apollo's slight Concussion. It was an opossum was on the porch one night and scared him really bad.

    Apollo hit his head last night.It came back and Apollo was scared, startedthumping andrunning around his cage.He was so scared at one point he ran full tilt into the side of his cage, the wall side. All I heard was this horrible crash. Apollo stood the and shook his head.He sat down then fellover to his side.

    I reached into grab him and hold him tomeand he jumped up and looked disorientated. He has no cuts or bumps. There was no blood in his ears, nose ormouth.Hisright eye and ears have suddenly started twitching. Not like seizure twitching but more like a tic. It lasts about 3seconds. He's alert while it happens and is responsive before during and after.

    His cheek is a tiny bit swelled but it doesn't seem painful. He was cleaning his face a little while ago and it doesn'tseem be painful. He lets me touch and doesn't seem to bother him. Rabbits hidepain so I'm keeping a close eye on him.

    The twitching hasn't gotten worse. It hasn't gotten better but it hasn't gotten worse.The general consensus is that Apollo has a mild concussion. His eye and ear twitching is probably a result of that and his cheek is a bit swelled.

    Kathy and the vet agrees that I'm doing all that can be done for him at this point. I tested his ability to track an object. I've checked to make sure his pupls are both the same size and react the same. I've tested his hearing and made sure he could move his ear.

    Fri Apr 1st, 2005 We had a bit of a problem lastnight. He had 2 very small seizures last night. If you have ever gotten a cold chill down your spine and the involuntary shake and brrr. Well they were like that. The first one lasted about 15seconds. A little while later an even milder one that lasted about 8 seconds.

    I called the vet and we agree that there is no point in medicating him at this point. If he continues having them then we will have no choice. So I have rigged his cage with bells. The slightest movement and I look over. Plus if I happen to be in another room I hear it and come running. I also set up a bunny monitor. It's actually a baby monitor. His eye and ear are still twitching. It has stayed pretty constant at 3-4 times an hour.

    He wasn't allowed out of his cage either as we needed to keep him quiet and calm.


    Sat Apr 2nd, 2005
    Apollo is still holding his own. The twitching episodes are still holding at 3 an hour. Thankfully he isn't startled by the spasms now. I just hate that he has to go through this.

    I am going to let him out for the first time since this started. I was afraid that the way the spasms were startling himthat he would panic and bolt and end up hurting himself more.

    Sun Apr 3rd, 2005
    I think we are finally down to 2 episodes.The past 2 hours he has only had two twitching episodes.

    Tue Apr 5th, 2005
    Apollo has only had the occasional twitch today. They are so far and in between that it's not even a matter of how many an hour.

    Wed Apr 6th, 2005 No Twitching.
    moved his cage 6inches from the wall so we never have another injury like this. I always thought I was prepared for anything Boy was I wrong. I have learned to plan ahead even more so and be ready for anything.


    It took over a month for his personality to come completely back to where it was. Seeing as how it was a brain injury he wasn't given any pain meds because we didn't want it to mask any signs he was getting worse.

    I have a picture of his face after it happened and the swelling was at it's worst.

    Tina
     
  8. Dec 7, 2005 #8

    naturestee

    naturestee

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    gypsy wrote:
    The bacteria in probiotics are not the same bacteria that are normally in a rabbit's intestines. There's some argument over whether these new bacteria can even survive a rabbits' stomach and make a successful colony in their intestines. These bacteria may exist in other animals' intestines normally, I'm not sure.

    There are probiotics that say that they can be given to rabbits, such as Bene-bac, but they still have these same bacteria. Some people have had good results from giving probiotics to their rabbits and some vets do prescribe them. In some cases it might not hurt, but my vet was leary of it as Fey reacted badly to two other commonly prescribed medications.

    Here's an article on probiotics in rabbits:http://www.medirabbit.com/EN/GI_diseases/Probiotics/probiotics.htm

    And an article on rabbit GI physiology:
    http://www.hrschicago.org/gitractfr.html

    From the last article: The dominant bacteria in the cecum of the healthy adult rabbit is Bacteriodes with small amounts of Clostridium sp. and E. coli. Note that Lactobacillus species are not common or normal inhabitants of the adult rabbit GIT, therefore, in my opinion it makes no sense to feed products that contain Lactobacillus to our pets. In addition, unprotected live bacterial products fed to a rabbit will be destroyed in the very acid pH of the stomach.

    Note that the primary bacteria in probiotics are various species of Lactobacillus.

    Hope this helps!:D

     
  9. Dec 7, 2005 #9

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  10. Dec 7, 2005 #10

    dajeti2

    dajeti2

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    Incredible wealth of information. I referred to this site religiously when battling stasis with both Apollo and Koda & Norman.

    Tina
     
  11. Dec 8, 2005 #11

    Kricket

    Kricket

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    what theproblem was- Ticks

    how it happened (if possible to someone else could avoid the same situation):
    In the heat of the summer here in Arizona ticks are allover the place. Under the vet's advice, I kept the buns (inside) out of the run until I could completely remove all of the grass. Through the summer I would intermittently remove blades of grass that would appear. And regular once-overs after coming inside. Vet says ticks should not be a problem in the cooler winter months.

    how long recovery took-Few days.

    method(s)of treatment-Ivermectin

    any side affects of treat-Star became violently ill, stayed overnight at the vet and had fluid IVs. Shorty was fine.

    and anything else you feel is important to add.- Star not only shed all of the ticks, but also passed several worms.



    Great thread, Freddysmom :)
     
  12. Dec 8, 2005 #12

    Carolyn

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    This is a post from BunnyMommy.

    UPDATE! The test results are back, and Sherman gets a clean bill of health! :D

    DISCLAIMER: I am not a medical practitioner, so any observations in this post should be interpreted simply as a matter of my personal opinion. Any symptomatic treatment regarding your bunny should be done in affiliation with a licensed veterinarian under the auspices of established medical practices and good common sense.

    Now, that being said, let's get down to the nitty-gritty! As you all know, Sherman was adopted. Because I only had a marginal picture of his past medical illnesses and medical care, I became greatly concerned when he started sniffling on the day that we brought him home. In all of the research that I'd done before we got him, a common theme emerged in regards to sniffling and sneezing: Respiratory illness is the leading cause of morbidity and mortality in bunnies if left untreated. Some may think that it was overkill to take as many steps as I did and to spend as much money as we have to ensure Sherman's health, but my personal philosophy is that he is now a member of our family, and it's our responsibility to make just as much effort to maintain his health and curry his longevity as we would for any other family member.

    I'm writing this very long narrative in the hopes that it will help others who have sneezing/sniffling bunnies and will give them a road map of the steps that they might need to take to restore their bunnies back to full and optimal health.

    Sherman started sniffling on the ride home on the day that we picked him up. I assumed that since he was outdoors when we went to get him and that the pollen count was extremely high that he was just having an allergic reaction. However, he continued to sniffle and eventually started sneezing too. I continued to check him for discharge from eyes, nose, ears, paws (from wiping his nose), but none ever materialized, so I continued to operate under the assumption that he just had "allergies". The sneezing and sniffling began to increase in frequency and finally, around the fifth or sixth day or so,I was on the floor playing with him. He sneezed and five or six droplets of thick yellow mucus were excreted onto my leg.

    Since one of the most definitive indicators of infection is a thick yellow discharge, I got on the phone to one of the 24 hour animal emergency rooms here, one of the best in the city, and spoke to a nurse and asked her if she felt that his symptoms warranted an emergency visit or could we wait until the next day during normal business hours. The nurse stated that rabbits were classified an exotic species and as such their physiology was very delicate. She confirmed that potentially a respiratory infection could indeed be fatal to our bunny and that he could decline quickly without warning. In anyways, they couldn't make a definitive diagnosis without actually seeing him.

    So at 11:00 p.m. that night we packed up my sweet baby and whisked him to the emergency room. There he was examined and diagnosed symptomatically. The vet was able to see signs of the discharge in his nasal cavity. His official diagnostic impression was "potential respiratory infection". He was prescribed Baytril suspension 20 mg/ml. We were instructed togive 1.0 ml orally every 12 hours for 10 days. The antibiotic was to be kept refrigerated, and we were to shake it well before each use.

    A word about Baytril (generic name:enrofloxacin): My research indicates that Baytril is one of the few antibiotics indicated to be well tolerated and effective with no negative side effects to the bunny. It's my understanding that the bunny's digestive system is very delicately balanced and any disruption in its normal operation can lead to death. Baytril can even be used long-term without detriment. For more information about Baytril, visit
    http://www.baytril.com .

    On the night of his ER visit, Sherman was also given a subcutaneous injection of fluids (in his ear). His discharge instructions stated, that "Sherman should be rechecked immediately if you see any signs of difficulty breathing, rapid breathing, lethargy, depression,diarrhea, or not eating/drinking."

    (*I must also emphasize here as an aside that the best veterinarian for bunnies is one who sees high numbers of exotic species as their physiology is so unique that it requires specialized care.)

    Sherman's symptoms cleared completely two to three days after starting his medication regimen. Fortunately for me, when I posted this to the board, Buck and Carolyn had the courage and integrity to tactfully inform me that there was a real possibility that his symptoms might recur and may even be incurable. Painful as this revelation was, I processed it, and filed it away for future reference.

    Sherman did very well for a week to 10 days after his recovery. Then it happened again ; a sniffle. I got a little apprehensive, but my husband told me not to lose my cool. It was just one sniffle. The next day it happened again; more than once. The day after that he was sniffling and sneezing, approximately four to five times in total that day. I again looked for signs of discharge.Nothing.

    The next day I called the vet. I was able to keep calm because I'd had time to prepare my mind thanks to Buck's and Carolyn's warnings but still, a little voice in the back of my head kept whispering, "Pasturella". Those of you familiar to the rabbit world know that this is a word that holds the resonance of many consequences, especially for those who breed rabbits. This is the dreaded of the dreaded in terms of respiratory infections in bunnies. For more detailed information on Pasturella, follow this link:
    http://www.rabbit.org/care/pasturella.html .

    I had three primary objectives in getting Sherman to the vet:

    � Treatment
    �A blood culture to definitively ascertain whether he had Pasturella or not
    �To discuss long-term therapy options if he did indeed have the disease(euthanasia was just not an option for me).

    Sherman had an in-depth physical examination and the blood test. The blood test portion of the exam alone came to$74.00. To accomplish the test, the vet shaved a portion of one of Sherman's legs and drew blood from there. He warned us that there might be a little bruising in the area. Sherman seemed no worse for the wear. The blood tests were to return in three to four business days.

    The doctor told us that based on his physical exam findings that Sherman was in excellent health, and that we were doing a good job of meeting his nutritional needs. He checked his vital signs,his lungs were clear, and there were no signs of discharge at all. There was just the sneezing.

    We were told that possibly Sherman had "allergies". He said that this could be due to any number of factors, i.e. dust from his bedding or hay, exposure to environmental allergens, and that indeed it was quite normal for some bunnies to sneeze every now and then just because. During the course of our conversation and as I began to ask the doctor more and more questions, it occurred to me that there was a possibility that the majority of Sherman's favorite hiding places probably were (ahem) a little dusty. He likes to hide under the treadmill, behind some of the furniture, under the sofa, behind the TV, etc.

    When we got home I got down on my hands and knees with a flashlight and inspected. I wasn't surprised to see that these were particular areas were rather dusty. We got down to spring-cleaning, moving furniture, vacuuming and cleaning carpets.When the carpet dried and we began to allow Sherman access again his symptoms immediately disappeared.

    On this morning the vet called and informed us that Sherman's blood test was completely clear; not only did he not have the disease, but he had never even been exposed to it.

    The moral of this story: Although everything turned out well for us, as bunny owners I think that it's always prudent to err on the side of caution. I'd rather be safe than sorry any day. A bunny's system is very delicate and they hide their symptoms very well, sometimes until it's too late. The story could very well have turned in another direction.

    Some points that I think are important:

    - A relationship with a veterinarian should be established in advance of a bunny emergency so that he/she will already be familiar with yourpet's medical history.

    -More importantly, it's best to establish a relationship with a vet who specializes in the care of exotics. Bunnies require a level of medical care over and beyond the traditional.

    -When bunnies exhibit signs of respiratory illness, it's good to get the opinion of a medical professional. Sometimes diagnostic testing is required.

    -Look for signs of discharge from the eyes, ears, nose, or on the paws from bunny wiping his nose.

    - Is the bunny acting depressed or lethargic? Is he eating/drinking normally?

    - MAKE SURE YOUR VET DOESN'T PRESCRIBE AMOXICILLIN FOR YOUR BUNNY. IT CAN BE FATAL. (A vet with real bunny experience wouldn't do this anyway.)

    -Carolyn gave Sherman a bottle of a product called VetRx[sub]TM [/sub](
    http://www.compasnac.com/cvp/14/1438/1438009.htm ). This may be helpful in alleviating yourbunny's symptoms.

    -Your bunny's respiratory symptoms may not be serious; then too, they may be. Err on the side of caution.

    Many thanks to all of you for your prayers, encouragement, and support during Sherman's illness. You are greatly appreciated.

    Hope this helps!

     
  13. Dec 9, 2005 #13

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    Thanks Carolyn , I wentlooking for Shermans thread last nightand couldnt find it , I must not havelooked far enough . kept at it until nearly midnight. I think I joined the Forum right aboutnear the end of this particular post andfound her observations facinating . I amso glad You found it I was fixingto go on another hunt and search for it Mission .
     
  14. Dec 9, 2005 #14

    JimD

    JimD

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    gypsy wrote:
    :)

    http://rabbitsonline.net/view_topic.php?id=185&forum
     
  15. Dec 12, 2005 #15

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    Cheddar's Vet Trip:

    I am back from the Vets with Little Cheddar , Cheddar as You know is one of the Blue Tort Babies.

    The Vets confirmed what I had suspected ,that its a case of being poisoned , he was presenting all the symptoms , lethargic, weakness , inability to right him self . The Vet gave him SubQ fluids tokeep him from dehydrating and a shotfor the tummy pain , the neurological part of it may or may not work itself outat a later date . she also put him on a Quarter tab of baytril twice a day .

    It is my understanding, Vets in the last weekend weekend have been findingan increased number of poisonings , possibly dueto the hay and its contents.they are not exactly sure what is causing itand someone is supposed to belooking into it . Though My Vet wasn'tsure Who was doing theactual looking

    Right now he is a bit perkier, and hasrolled onto his feet rather than lay in what ever position I put him in. Side note , 10 week old babies will not lay across your lap in a froggy style fashion willingly (he was).

    I just gave him a syringe of Raspberry teawhich he greedily accepted , poor baby was thirsty. plus it helps the tea itself is naturally sweet ,even went so far as to clean it off hischest when he moved andthe tea didn't go with him. this is a good sign .
     
  16. Jan 12, 2006 #16

    FreddysMom

    FreddysMom

    FreddysMom

    Well-Known Member

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    Location:
    Freddyville, New Jersey, USA
    Genital Injury

    Somehow Freddy's lil winkie got stepped on and ripped in half on one side.

    It took two weeks to heal

    Initially cleaned with a little peroxide, but no other treatment.

    Its fully healed now and even "fused" itself back together.

    When I brought him to the Vet, she did not feel the need to put him on antibiotics b/c she said that mucous membranes have such a quick cell turn over rate that they rarely get infected and b/c of that will heal very quickly (within two weeks)

    Another reason it was just left to heal on its own is that there were no (for lack of a better word(s) )"hangy pieces" . So everything had a blood supply and I didn't have to worry about any tissue going necrotic. In that case antibiotics would have been needed b/c dead tissue is a breeding ground for the nastiest of pathogens.


     
  17. Jan 12, 2006 #17

    gentle giants

    gentle giants

    gentle giants

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    Location:
    , Illinois, USA
    I have my own little story, but I'll warn you all, this one has a sad ending.

    Right after my husband and I got married, a friend of mine was having to get rid of her pet rabbit, Scooter. I said I would take him. We soon had him set up in his own bedroom, with the furniture taken out because he like to-ah- squirt? I would let him out in his room every morning to play.

    One morning when I came in to feed him and let him out for playtime, he wasn't acting right, and had no interest in coming out to play, which was very unusual for him. I picked him up and looked him over, and found he had a runny nose. He was very droopy and uninterested in food or water, his eyes were glassy and dull.
    I went and and called the vet, and they gave me an emergency appointment for 9:30 ( I called at 8). Half an hour later, I went in to check on him again and found him laying on his side, breathing shallowly. I picked him up, and ten minutes later he died in my arms.

    I have never found out what happened. He had been fine the night before, came out for his usual playtime, and harassed me while I was cleaning his cage just as usual.
    One thing I have always wondered: This was in late spring, and the night before he died was pretty warm, so I left all the windows in the house open, including in Scooter's room. During the night, it rained. His cage wasn't under the window, and I don't believe he got wet, but I have always wondered if the cool, wet air coming in that he wasn't used to may have made him sick. This is why I tend to get panicky if I hear one of my buns sneeze, or see a wet nose.
     
  18. Jan 12, 2006 #18

    naturestee

    naturestee

    naturestee

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    Location:
    Sheboygan, Wisconsin, USA
    Dissolving Stitches

    Fey had a minor glitch with healing from her injuries. The week before New Year's, I noticed that Fey had started licking one area of her old wound a lot. She had licked the fur off and the skin was irritated. I called and made a vet appointment, but my very busy vet couldn't get her in until several days later. Fey continued to lick and the skin looked more and more irritated. When I took her in to the vet's, part of the bare spot looked swollen and white. It looked for all the world like an abcess to me.

    My vet was concerned, too, but he wasn't quite sure what it was. He told me that he wanted to see what was inside the swelling, then took Fey into the surgery room. She was back in my arms just a few minutes later. My very relieved vet told me that she did not have an infection- not even a trace.What happened was that the knot from her internal dissolving sutures did not dissolve. It started twisting around inside of her,pulling her inner skin tissue with it. He had snipped the knot and pulled it out. His incision was about the size of a pin head. He told me to treat her like normal- no special measures as the incision was so small and the wound was clean. Fey is now fine, and her fur is all grown back so you can't tell anything happened.

    Plus, my vet didn't charge me a dime. It wasn't even his handiwork- Fey was stitched up by an emergency vet in another city. I love my vet!
     

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