I need help fast!

Discussion in 'Health & Wellness' started by Ferdinand, May 30, 2015.

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  1. May 30, 2015 #1

    Ferdinand

    Ferdinand

    Ferdinand

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    Little newborn cotton tail that my mom found in our sheep pastures, is only a few days old (eyes aren't even open). I just fed it, and it ate a lot, but now he is twitching, curled into a ball, and suddenly curls his head under himself. I read something about over feeding, and I'm scared I may have.
     
  2. May 30, 2015 #2

    stevesmum

    stevesmum

    stevesmum

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    Fed it what?? And why?
     
  3. May 30, 2015 #3
    Take him to a wildlife rehabber.
     
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  4. May 30, 2015 #4

    JBun

    JBun

    JBun

    Jenny - Health & Wellness Mod Staff Member Administrator Moderator

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    Try stimulating him to urinate with a damp cotton ball. See if that helps relieve some of the pressure.
     
  5. May 30, 2015 #5

    ladysown

    ladysown

    ladysown

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    baby rabbits should be left where they are found. Seriously.
    In the meantime,

    1. baby rabbits have a hard time when on their own regulating their body temperatures
    2. if overfed, your bunny could get sick. Be mindful of scours.

    So.. for the latter you need to wait and see. You can't really do anything except wait it out.
    You may wish to read this article: http://www.bio.miami.edu/hare/orphan.html

    For the first... keep that kit warm. Hold him close, use a hot water bottle, something...just keep it warm.
     
  6. May 30, 2015 #6

    Ferdinand

    Ferdinand

    Ferdinand

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    If she didn't bring him in, he would've died (feeding time the sheep get crazy) and there was no nest nearby.

    I am keeping him close to my body so he stays warm.

    I fed him kitten milk replacer like the vet said to do.

    After staying warm in a little pouch with wool in it, he seems to be doing much better. Mom said the twitching and curling into a ball was just because he was getting comfortable.

    He didn't eat much this morning, so I'm going to try again this afternoon, when he wakes up. I am also going to try the cotton ball thing to see if it helps him at all.
     
  7. May 30, 2015 #7

    Ana_The_Dreamer

    Ana_The_Dreamer

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    Please, PLEASE take it to a wildlife rehabilitator. I myself am a wildlife rehabilitator. I can't tell you how many times I get people bringing cottontails into my shelter that they tried to care for by themselves and failed horribly. Cottontail babies are one of the hardest wildlife creatures to care for properly; even for someone with years of training. I urge you to get it to a wildlife shelter ASAP!
    People who are not trained really shouldn't even attempt to feed baby cottontails on their own.

    There are probably plenty of these laws where you live that say that trying to raise a cottontail without a license is illegal, if you need more of a "push" to get it to a proper rehabilitator.
    If you are helping this bunny because you feel sorry for it, I prefer you not leave it off at wildlife centers that take in birds of prey and small carnivores primarily for reasons I think you can figure out on your own. Find a rehabilitator that cares for only wild rabbits and squirrels. (IF possible. If not possible, go with the next best option.) Avoid facilities that have multiple volunteers caring for individual cottontails - that never works out well. In my shelter, only ONE person is allowed to even feed the cottontails. We keep them in a little area far, far away from anyone. And the person in-charge of those particular babies only feeds them when needed then doesn't touch them. No human interaction. No matter how "cute" they look, you ONLY touch them when they need to be fed! There needs to be a harmonious balance between human contact: and remaining wild like they need to.
    That's why only a professional should be allowed to raise them.

    Early mortality due to lack of Colostrum and natural milk factors is a huge killer in baby cottontails.
    This is particularly a problem in babies that are under 2/3 weeks of age.
    Cottontail mother’s milk has protective ingredients called,"antimicrobial fatty acids", that artificial milk replacements cannot duplicate, like kitten milk replacement. Their first milk (colostrum) is very rich in an active form of vitamin A called "retinol" - something not found in replacement formulas but essential for normal development.
    I know you are probably trying to take care of this baby out of the kindness of your heart, but please, take it to a wildlife shelter.
     
  8. May 31, 2015 #8

    Ferdinand

    Ferdinand

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    Yesterday we took it to a wildlife rehab, but the only one around us was for pretty much any wildlife. They said they would give us a call to let us know how it was doing, and about 10 hours later, they called to tell us it had died. It was too cold, and just didn't bounce back into health. Next time we find one, we will bring it to the center right away. :tears2:
     
  9. May 31, 2015 #9

    Ana_The_Dreamer

    Ana_The_Dreamer

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    I'm sorry to hear that the cottontail passed away. Unfortunately this will have to serve as an example of how fragile their little lives are and how they always need professional care ASAP.
    I'm sure you tried your hardest to help the little guy.
     
  10. May 31, 2015 #10

    ladysown

    ladysown

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    how about next time you find one... put it back in it's nest. with careful searching you can almost always find it. Generally just a depression in the ground.
     
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