Hypothyroidism, T3 and T4 levels, L-thyroxine dosage

Discussion in 'Health & Wellness' started by Katka, Oct 7, 2017.

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  1. Oct 7, 2017 #1

    Katka

    Katka

    Katka

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    Hello, does anybody please have any experience with hypothyroidism?

    I am searching for any information..
    - T4 and T3 levels - has anybody tested? could you please share the levels?
    - thyroid replacement hormone therapy and L-thyroxine dosage to start with
    - iodine? herbs? kelp? to improve thyroid function

    my bun has low levels of T3 and T4
    T4 ... 1.2 μg/dl
    T3 ... 71.3 ng/dl

    the lab’s ref. values for T4 are 3.9 - 5.3 μg/dl (they have no ref. value for T3)

    other ref. values I found
    T4 ... 1.7 - 2.4 μg/dl
    T3 ... 130 - 143 ng/dl
    (from the book "The Laboratory Rabbit, Guinea Pig, Hamster, and Other Rodents")
     
  2. Oct 8, 2017 #2

    samoth

    samoth

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    I didn't see anything in Varga's Rabbit Medicine, but there's a short section in the BSAVA Manual of Rabbit Medicine:

    "Naturally occurring thyroid and parathyroid disease in rabbits is not reported in the literature... [m]ost research on hyper- and hypothyroidism in rabbits involves the study of isolated tissue or cells."

    It goes on to state that hyperthyroidism can be induced in lab rabbits via thiiodothyronine (T3) or l-thyroxine (T4). Given how potent these [prescription] hormones are in the human organism, and apparent lack of data involving rabbits here, I don't think you're likely to find a protocol for treatment.

    Are there clinical symptoms? And what does it really mean for those values to be low? I seem to recall reading that there are numerous reference values for such things in companion animals, and that they tend to vary drastically from one source to the next. **

    ** So Varga's text gives a T4 reference of 6.4-8.3 ug/dL (cf. Jones, 1975). This is a huge difference from your reference... enough so that I wouldn't put any trust in either. Really, absent an clinical symptoms, I wouldn't worry your rabbit. Just make sure its diet and exercise are in check :)
     
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  3. Oct 8, 2017 #3

    katadvokat

    katadvokat

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    It may be worth contacting Dr Ester van Praag, author of Medirabbit website. She may be able to direct you to references for normal levels. She collects a lot of data. Im not sure if Im allowed to add the email in my post but you can find it bottom of page of the Medirabbit website.
     
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  4. Oct 8, 2017 #4

    Katka

    Katka

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    Thank you for your replies, I wouldn’t worry either having no symptoms, but I’ve been trying to solve my bun’s problems since January ... long and complicated story and hard to find a vet in my country that would help..

    short version: sudden hind limb weakness, EC (IgM) negative -> high calcium and creatinine levels, calcinosis in soft tissue -> kidney disease confirmed, bones hypercalcification, calcification in her kidneys, vertebras, aorta, some cartilage (ear) -> no cure possible they said -> herbal treatment, progress in walking, but kidneys still not working - calcinosis growing again, incontinence continues, calcium and creatinine are higher every test

    long version with the progress, videos and all the test results, xrays and CT scans here: http://mitsie.pruskova.com/Mitsie-rabbit.htm

    Thyroid problems (hypothyroidism) might cause renal problems (possibly reversible), that’s why the T3 and T4 test, and Dr Ester van Praag was actually the one who helped me and suggested it (but haven’t heard from her for a while).
    I read many studies and also found some T3 and T4 levels that are very different.

    From some studies I'm getting to the L-thyroxine dose of up to 20 μg/kg/day orally (human doses are much smaller: 1 - 1.7 μg/kg/day).

    As I have no other option now and I am afraid about how long her kidneys will work, I should probably try L-thyroxin, lower doses and check the blood levels regularly.. but it would be great to find more information, and since I am more natural and herbal person, I would like to find some herbal treatment and the initial cause of her problems, why thyroid disfunction..
     
  5. Oct 10, 2017 #5

    RavenousDragon

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    From my experience thyroid problems are VERY rare in rabbits, but possible (I've never seen one, but I've heard of one at the school I attend). Thyroid problems in other animals are often idiopathic- meaning we don't know a cause (generally thought to be autoimmune or metabolic of some sort) and the only treatment for hypothyroidism I know is L-thyroxine. This is just a hormone that the animal can no longer make on it's own. You are just replacing a natural hormone with a natural hormone when you use it (I know it comes in a medication form, but that doesn't mean it's not natural). I'm not sure you will find a cause of thyroid disfuntion, but if you do, please share!
     
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  6. Oct 10, 2017 #6

    katadvokat

    katadvokat

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    Do you happen know if pituitary problems are less rare?

    btw, the little bun in your avatar is precious!
     
  7. Oct 11, 2017 #7

    RavenousDragon

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    I haven't personally seen or heard of it- but that doesn't mean that it is rare or not! Unfortunately I don't have a better answer for you. I do know hypothyroidism from pituitary issues or from the thyroid itself are basically treated the same way in dogs and cats- except that pituitary problems leading to hypothyroidism are often cancerous, so surgery may also be used in those cases.

    Thank you!! Her name is Brandy and she knows how adorable she is. :p
     
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  8. Oct 4, 2019 #8

    Faren

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    Katka,

    Did you ever figure out the answer to this question? My bunny has just been diagnosed, and can't figure out how to treat the bunny for Hypo-thyroid. Have you had any success?
     

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