How to make rabbit less scared of the other rabbit?

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Isaac12

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Ok so a while back I was bonding my rabbits (Nala and Snowy) and I worked out well for only 1 rabbit (Nala). (Which was the dominant one)
And because the dominant one is kinda more aggressive and territorial than the other one it made the other one scared and now he bites Nala when she gets too close. Nala poses no real threat other than some chasing. Any tips? (P.S they are both spayed/neutered)
 

Blue eyes

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So this was happening in August...
Snowy will check out Nala a bit but Nala lunges at him and bites him when he gets too close. Nala will occasionally chase after him but other than that she’s not that aggressive.
And this is happening now...
now he (Snowy) bites Nala when she gets too close. Nala poses no real threat other than some chasing. Any tips? (P.S they are both spayed/neutered)
Snowy is reacting as expected -- biting Nala in defense because she kept lunging & biting at him. This means they aren't bonded and may never bond.

If you really want to make it work as a bond, you may need to totally separate them and hope they forget each other. Basically you would be doing a do-over. To do this, ideally, both would go to a separate location in the home. Then after 2 weeks of total separation, they would be re-introduced in some place neither has been before.

Before they are re-introduced in this new neutral space, it may help to put them in side-by-side pens (not touching) for several weeks so they can again get accustomed to being near each other without any possibility of threat from the other. After that length of time, they can be monitored and introduced fact to face.

I saw in past posts that stress-bonding was recommended to you. I do not think stress bonding is viable for bonding rabbits unless they are already inclined to get along anyway. Yours do not seem so inclined. The following article explains more on what/why stress bonding is not helpful.

While they are spending time apart, you can read up on better methods of bonding here:
 

Isaac12

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I will have to note that I haven’t been bonding them every since august. In fact, I’ve only done the bonding around 10 times. Maybe I should just continue it?
 

Mac189

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I would generally advise that if what you are doing isn't working, try a new strategy. Maybe wait a few more weeks and let them get used to each other across bars then let them interact in a much larger area than you've previously tied to bond in. Forcing interaction could be part of the problem. Additionally, maybe fill the area they meet in with distractions like toys and food, so they can share a space without being each other's sole focus. Instead of focusing exclusively on dominance, pay attention to how your rabbits offer affection. I have one bun who is generally very confident and one who's more nervous, however, the nervous one wants to seek comfort when afraid. The confident rabbit acted as a check-in, emotional support to the nervous rabbit and she accepts his guarding and affection in return. They bonded because the situation they met in played to their strengths and the space allowed them to explore and rely on each other for what they wanted in a relationship with another rabbit.

Definitely read Blue Eyes posted articles and look into how rabbit personalities can interact. Best of luck!
 

Isaac12

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I would generally advise that if what you are doing isn't working, try a new strategy. Maybe wait a few more weeks and let them get used to each other across bars then let them interact in a much larger area than you've previously tied to bond in. Forcing interaction could be part of the problem. Additionally, maybe fill the area they meet in with distractions like toys and food, so they can share a space without being each other's sole focus. Instead of focusing exclusively on dominance, pay attention to how your rabbits offer affection. I have one bun who is generally very confident and one who's more nervous, however, the nervous one wants to seek comfort when afraid. The confident rabbit acted as a check-in, emotional support to the nervous rabbit and she accepts his guarding and affection in return. They bonded because the situation they met in played to their strengths and the space allowed them to explore and rely on each other for what they wanted in a relationship with another rabbit.

Definitely read Blue Eyes posted articles and look into how rabbit personalities can interact. Best of luck!
Will try.
 
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