How do I start litter training?

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hollyjayneee

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My rabbit luna isn't litter trained, she's 5 months old and free roams most of the time, I have no idea how to litter train.
 

Hermelin

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You should restrict her area, so it will be easier for you to control and clean after her.

Start small then make her space larger til free roaming.

Make sure your litter box have hay in it and water bowl nearby. If she never go to the litter box before. You can wipe her urine with a paper and lay it in the litter box.

So it will smell like a toilet to her, then you will just clean up everywhere she’s not supposed to go.

You can use normal vinegar to wash away the urine smell. No other place should smell of urine for a bunny or they will go there again.

She’s 5 months so it will be harder, but spaying will help. Otherwise you will just have to keep on cleaning after her until 1 year. They will often calm down around that time and will often stop the over the top territorial markings.

But she will still mark territory with her urine, if it doesn’t smell like her. Often only spaying will help during these situation.

If she’s not spayed, during the times she get ready to breed and get hormonal spikes she might lose her toilet training for some time.

But this doesn’t happen to all bunnies.
 

zuppa

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The easiest way would be to limit her space for training time, just keep her in her cage with the floor clean and put a properly prepared litter tray in one corner and watch her all the time removing any poop and pee from the floor and putting to her toilet so she can get the idea. The only toilet box should smell like toilet and after she pees anywhere else you just clean that area with vinegar/water solution to remove the smell of urine. If you could post some pics of her setup that would be helpful
 

zuppa

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You should restrict her area, so it will be easier for you to control and clean after her.

Start small then make her space larger til free roaming.

Make sure your litter box have hay in it and water bowl nearby. If she never go to the litter box before. You can wipe her urine with a paper and lay it in the litter box.

So it will smell like a toilet to her, then you will just clean up everywhere she’s not supposed to go.

You can use normal vinegar to wash away the urine smell. No other place should smell of urine for a bunny or they will go there again.

She’s 5 months so it will be harder, but spaying will help. Otherwise you will just have to keep on cleaning after her until 1 year. They will often calm down around that time and will often stop the over the top territorial markings.

But she will still mark territory with her urine, if it doesn’t smell like her. Often only spaying will help during these situation.

If she’s not spayed, during the times she get ready to breed and get hormonal spikes she might lose her toilet training for some time.

But this doesn’t happen to all bunnies.
Great explanation Hermelin :)
My two lop girls are still not spayed but they are very good with their toilet inside their cages and in their extended territories but outside that area they'd mark here and there, Smokey is about 7 months old and Bernie is one year old I am thinking of spaying Smokey this autumn but not entirely sure now because just realised how dangerous can be anesthetics during the surgery. She has more problems like she is very territorial and can even bite she's very scared of humans I believe she had some bad experience before I adopted her, we keep working on it and I see a little progress but thought that spaying should help, but maybe she will change when she's older, we'll see. Bernie is one year now and she was a bit territorial when I adopted her but now she fully trusts me and let me be in her cage and she doesn't usually pee outside her cage but sometimes would poop near Smokey's playpen mainly because Smokey immediately comes out to protect her territory. Bernie is a very nice and placid rabbit and I see no reason to spay her if they'd bond after Smokey's spaying that would be brilliant, if not we'll see what else can be done. They like each other and both are coming near other's cage laying there when one of them is out maybe as you say after Smokey is one year old she will change and they can bond as they are.
 

hollyjayneee

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The easiest way would be to limit her space for training time, just keep her in her cage with the floor clean and put a properly prepared litter tray in one corner and watch her all the time removing any poop and pee from the floor and putting to her toilet so she can get the idea. The only toilet box should smell like toilet and after she pees anywhere else you just clean that area with vinegar/water solution to remove the smell of urine. If you could post some pics of her setup that would be helpful
she's fine when she's indoors ( she goes in her hide house only but I think that might be because of my dogs sent is everywhere ) its when she's in her hutch ( mostly art nighttime because of the dog ) I have a litter tray down where her veggies and pellets go and its got a cat wood pellet litter on the bottom which is covered with feeding hay, and her feeding g hay is in a separate part of the hutch which the floor is covered with cat litter wood pellets also. she only goes in 2 other places ( where she shouldn't ) so I think vinegar cleaning might work. my other rabbit was toilet trained when we adopted him and he's fine with going in the litter box.
 

Hermelin

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Great explanation Hermelin :)
My two lop girls are still not spayed but they are very good with their toilet inside their cages and in their extended territories but outside that area they'd mark here and there, Smokey is about 7 months old and Bernie is one year old I am thinking of spaying Smokey this autumn but not entirely sure now because just realised how dangerous can be anesthetics during the surgery. She has more problems like she is very territorial and can even bite she's very scared of humans I believe she had some bad experience before I adopted her, we keep working on it and I see a little progress but thought that spaying should help, but maybe she will change when she's older, we'll see. Bernie is one year now and she was a bit territorial when I adopted her but now she fully trusts me and let me be in her cage and she doesn't usually pee outside her cage but sometimes would poop near Smokey's playpen mainly because Smokey immediately comes out to protect her territory. Bernie is a very nice and placid rabbit and I see no reason to spay her if they'd bond after Smokey's spaying that would be brilliant, if not we'll see what else can be done. They like each other and both are coming near other's cage laying there when one of them is out maybe as you say after Smokey is one year old she will change and they can bond as they are.
I was also afraid to neuter my small buck, because he was extremely small and easily got sick as a kit. Myself waited until I found people that had often neutered/spayed bunnies. Also for his weight to go up (700 gram sized bunny [emoji23]). If I had a doe I would had spayed her at the rabbit expert vets instead and pay the double. Lucky me for living near the city which have veterinarian specialize on bunnies and are the best in the country.

So the most important it’s to find good veterinarian and often the spay will go without a problem. It will have a lot of health benefits for a bunny to be spayed/ neutered. Especially doe that react extremely bad when the hormones play with them. But you can always wait and see, you can never know after the hormones calms down and they are out from the rebel age. Also, you can never know if your bunnies have hidden health issues, that a normal check up will miss.

My bunnies stopped marketing everything after 1 year old and calmed down, but they stilled used the couches and beds as toilets. At least my wardrobe was safe. I no longer have these problems.
 

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