How do I know if my rabbit enjoys being pet?

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Homework9293

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I've been trying to wonder and figure out. I know some rabbits love their nose rubs and such. And when I do it to my smallest girl (Diva) she starts closing her eyes.

How do I know if they're enjoying their nose rubbed? Is that one thing that shows they like it?
 

Blue eyes

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Generally if they don't like it, they will attempt to move away. Closing eyes usually means they're pretty relaxed.
 

Homework9293

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Generally if they don't like it, they will attempt to move away. Closing eyes usually means they're pretty relaxed.
I've decided to rehome them. I have them listed for rehoming.

I don't have the patience for such skittish animals. I've had them for almost 3 months and Oreo hasn't left the cage at all other than to poop in a secluded corner.

I swear it's the breeders that raise them incorrectly. My first rabbit Olaf I had no issues with. He was fully tamed within 2 months of me owning him. Litter trained within 2 weeks fully. No messes ANYWHERE.
 

JBun

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It has nothing to do with the breeder, for the most part. Rabbits are all different. They are sensitive prey animals with distinct individual personalities. Which means, that though they can have general similarities of behavior, each rabbit will learn, trust, and mentally develop in their own way, at their own pace. Just like with dogs, cats, and even people. We all learn and behave differently, and at our own pace.

I'm sorry you've decided to rehome them, but it sounds like it might be for the best. Rabbits do take a lot of patience to earn their trust. But it's so rewarding and worthwhile when you do.
 

Homework9293

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It has nothing to do with the breeder, for the most part. Rabbits are all different. They are sensitive prey animals with distinct individual personalities. Which means, that though they can have general similarities of behavior, each rabbit will learn, trust, and mentally develop in their own way, at their own pace. Just like with dogs, cats, and even people. We all learn and behave differently, and at our own pace.

I'm sorry you've decided to rehome them, but it sounds like it might be for the best. Rabbits do take a lot of patience to earn their trust. But it's so rewarding and worthwhile when you do.
I'm not going to have a rabbit timid for their whole life. And end up staying in their cage their whole life. How is that fair?

What do you suggest I do instead of rehoming them?
 

JBun

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Normally it's not recommended that you take a rabbit out of it's cage, but let it decide to come out on it's own. But maybe you need to try something different with this rabbit. Maybe this rabbit thinks she's not allowed to come out into your territory, so she's staying in her cage. Maybe take the bunny out, see how she responds. If she just hops right back in, maybe just sit holding her and cuddling her for a while. See how she responds to that.

With rabbits(and any animal really), when what you're trying doesn't seem to be working, you may need to try something different, even if it might not be what is generally recommended. She may just respond differently than most other rabbits, and you just need to try out different things until you find just the right thing to help her feel safe and happy.
 

Homework9293

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Normally it's not recommended that you take a rabbit out of it's cage, but let it decide to come out on it's own. But maybe you need to try something different with this rabbit. Maybe this rabbit thinks she's not allowed to come out into your territory, so she's staying in her cage. Maybe take the bunny out, see how she responds. If she just hops right back in, maybe just sit holding her and cuddling her for a while. See how she responds to that.

With rabbits(and any animal really), when what you're trying doesn't seem to be working, you may need to try something different, even if it might not be what is generally recommended. She may just respond differently than most other rabbits, and you just need to try out different things until you find just the right thing to help her feel safe and happy.
Diva is fine. She runs around and does binkies constantly. But her problem is she runs away when I try to move my hand to pet her. She'll dip into a hiding place.

Oreo is stubborn everywhere. I tried holding her on my stomach for a few minutes every so often and she'll stay there but she's scared, she shakes. Sometimes oreo will come out when she see diva out however she always goes into a corner behind the cage and poops and just stays there. So I end up having to put her in her litter box along with the poop to teach her.

I have tried keeping the cage door closed but I don't want them to get so scared that they pee.

Tldr:

Diva : totally fine to come out on her own but is scared of me approaching her to pet or etc.

Oreo: won't come out at all and is very skittish.
 

CuppyND

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I understand your frustration. You’re spending so much time, resources, energy to show them love and attention. You give them a comfortable life and you want to interact with them, but they are not living up to your expectations. I totally feel you. I get annoyed with that sometimes too. Maybe bunnies aren’t the pet for you. I support your decision to rehome them.
 

john.thorpe1952

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Just a thought,but it might be wrth trying a stick with a feather on the end-sounds crazy but it works with many animals.The idea is that you gently touch them with them and stroke them,and then gradually shorten your grip on the stick, bringing you closer to them,talking t them of course.Avoid any strong perfumes or aftershaves or the scent of dogs or cats,which might annoy or alarm them.Take your time and see how it works out.
 

FunBunMom

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Diva is fine. She runs around and does binkies constantly. But her problem is she runs away when I try to move my hand to pet her. She'll dip into a hiding place.

Oreo is stubborn everywhere. I tried holding her on my stomach for a few minutes every so often and she'll stay there but she's scared, she shakes. Sometimes oreo will come out when she see diva out however she always goes into a corner behind the cage and poops and just stays there. So I end up having to put her in her litter box along with the poop to teach her.

I have tried keeping the cage door closed but I don't want them to get so scared that they pee.

Tldr:

Diva : totally fine to come out on her own but is scared of me approaching her to pet or etc.

Oreo: won't come out at all and is very skittish.
My rabbits for the first 3 months or so we’re like that, but slowly hand feed them lettuce or pellets and they will gradually gain your trust.
 
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