How do I bond my rabbit?

Discussion in 'General Rabbit Discussion' started by Farm_Lover_With_Bunnies, Oct 18, 2019.

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  1. Oct 18, 2019 #1

    Farm_Lover_With_Bunnies

    Farm_Lover_With_Bunnies

    Farm_Lover_With_Bunnies

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    hello fellow bunny lovers!

    So I have a rabbit who needs a friend! I got her when I didn’t know anything about rabbits really so I was unaware she needed a friend. (Don’t worry, I educated myself and she is in the best care now). I tried a male rabbit but they didn’t get along and I had to give him back. She was nice to him but he would always try and attack her which he succeeded and took a nice chunk of her ear and that’s when I decided bye bye for the rabbit. There is a shelter close to me that dose bunny dating, but it seems a little forced to me because the bunnies are going to be stressed so I won’t get an exact reaction, right? I know the chances of them getting along would be better doing this though, right? If this is something I should try what are signs that the rabbits will work and what are signs they won’t? Also when I bring the new bunny home, is the bonding process the same? Any help is greatly appreciated about bonding and finding the right bunny.

    Thanks!
     
  2. Oct 18, 2019 #2

    Blue eyes

    Blue eyes

    Blue eyes

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    I assume your female is already spayed? I am not of the opinion that every rabbit needs to have a bondmate. Some indoor rabbits can be perfectly content as single indoor buns. Don't feel like it is something you have to do.

    If you really want a second rabbit and feel like she would be happier, then bunny dating is a normal step in the process. You may want to wait a few weeks since she just had the trauma from the other rabbit. This could make her unusually nervous or hesitant with another rabbit.

    Bunny dating isn't anything sure fire but is a general assessment of potential compatibility. The real bonding doesn't get tested until you are back home with them. Find out if the shelter allows returns if a potential bondmate doesn't work out. (Rabbit rescues are more inclined to allow this.)

    For more info on the bonding process, check the following:
    http://www.cottontails-rescue.org.uk/information/bonding-bunnies/

    This will let you know what body language to look for and includes some videos of bondings of various types (going well, not going well, terrible). It is most helpful.
     
  3. Oct 18, 2019 #3

    zupper

    zupper

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    Hi, how old is she? Is she spayed?
     
  4. Oct 18, 2019 #4

    xbject

    xbject

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    The bunnies have to be spayed and neutered in order for bonding to work otherwise their hormones are stronger and crazier lol. I think it depends a little on how long the bunny has been alone with just you. I’ve had my single rabbit for almost 5 years and I feel like if I brought in another rabbit, it would mess up my rabbits routine and I don’t think she’d like sharing me lol. Rabbit only rescues are pretty much experts at bunny bonding but if there are other animals besides rabbits then they don’t know much since they pretty much take in animals to save them. What is the name of the shelter ? Is it a shelter for all animals or just rabbits?
     
  5. Oct 18, 2019 #5

    Farm_Lover_With_Bunnies

    Farm_Lover_With_Bunnies

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    So she is 2 years old October 30th and she has been spayed for about 5 months now. The male I tried her with was also fixed. The shelter I got the rabbit that didn’t work was called Bunny Boss rescue. They only have rabbits and guinea pigs but it’s an hour away and he only allows “returns” for a week after adopting which is no Time at all to bind rabbits imo. The one I’m going to now is a humane society. They are supposed to be good about the rabbits but they also have cats dogs and birds. I’m not home throughout the day a lot of the times so I can’t always give her attention, that’s why I wanted her to have a friend.
     
  6. Oct 18, 2019 #6

    Blue eyes

    Blue eyes

    Blue eyes

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    The choice is yours, of course. Daytime is usually a rabbit's downtime anyway. If you are there in morning and/or evenings to interact with her, she could be just fine. But you know your rabbit best and it's your call.
     
  7. Oct 19, 2019 #7

    Farm_Lover_With_Bunnies

    Farm_Lover_With_Bunnies

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    I torn at what to do here. I don’t want to not get her a friend and her be lonely or sad but I also don’t want to put her through the stress of trying to have a friend if she dosent want a friend. Can you keep a happy single rabbit? How do I tell if she’s better with or without another bunny? Should I just spoil her and not get a second bun?
     
  8. Oct 20, 2019 #8

    cwebster

    cwebster

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    We have successfully bonded our two bunnies. We put them in an indoor hutch, one on the top floor and one on the bottom. We gave them soft toys scented with the other bunnies smell. Then we put them in wire cages outside briefly each day next to one another so they could smell each other and touch noses. Then we put them together supervised in a bathroom. Dutchess bit Arnold just once, not very hard. We kept the bonding sessions short. When their being together seemed like a nonissue ( Arnold would beg for Dutchess to groom his face over and over and she gently groomed him), we put them together in one outdoor cage. No fighting. Eventually we opened up the barrier between the two cage floors in their indoor cage. They are inseparable and seem very happy. Both are about one to two years old, spayed and neutered.
     
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