Hi some advice on things I might need additional to things I’ve already written down :)

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So this is my list of things that I Know my bunny will need. This is just the rough draft btw and everything here isn’t perfect and there will be some changes.

ALSO: I have carpet and I would really hate to see it damaged and me getting my butt whooped. I know it’s natural instincts for bunnies to want to dig but does anyone have any advice that could prevent the digging BEFORE it actually starts to happen. I’m thinking on putting fleece to protect the floor. But I’m also scared that the bunny might chew it and get hurt. An area rug is also an option for me. I think there’s less risk with the rug, for both my bunny and the carpet.

I just need some opinions!


BUNNY COST

. Bunny adoptable = 160
Idk bonded?




HIDES/ equipment



  • Versitunnel - Bendable Tunnel and Bed for Rabbits and Small Pet ( $17)
  • Bunny bed
  • Mystery Mini Pee pad set for Guinea pig, Skinny pig, Rabbit, Bunny, Chinchilla, Ferret, Rat, Hedgehog, hamster, gerbil ( 10)
  • Bunch of toys from hoppy bunny shop
  • Travel bowl
  • Krolik XXL Rabbit Cage w/Wire Extenstion | Rabbit Cage Includes All Accessories & Measures ( 139)
  • Water and food bowl ( 10))
  • Cat house?
  • IRIS USA Open-Top Cat Litter Box with Shield and Scoop, Navy
  • Bunny chew toys
  • Soft harness
  • Area Rug from eBay






TOYS

  • Chew toys
  • Stacking cups
  • Details later








FEEDING



  • Alfalfa hay ( as bunny)
  • maybe switch to Timothy 2nd cut when older ?

  • Get supplies pet supply store

  • Kate, spinach , cabbage,
  • Hay rack ( above litter )
  • Make sure there’s always hay in litter
  • Woodstill pallwts for bedding








GROOMING



  • Brush
  • Lint roller
  • Furminator
  • Hair buster
  • Cat nail clippers
  • Emergency kit








FLYING WITH RABBIT

  • Carrier ( coated with puppy pad
  • Syringe ( for water )
  • Ziploc bag with hay
  • Ziploc with pallets
  • Bag of veggies
  • Pop out bowl
  • Pet remedy wipe








CLEANING SUPPLIES



  • White vinegar
  • Baking soda
  • Shampoo?




TREATS

  • Bananas ( small portions )
  • Blueberries ( small portions )
  • Dried fruit ( small portions )






Free roam rabbit in room, when in school put in kennel?




  • cord covers
  • Fleece




VET BILLS

  • $60 for annual checkup
  • Maybe even more
  • ( find good vet for exotic animal)
 

Blue eyes

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Haven't looked over the list yet but wanted to comment about the area rug. That would be a good option. Honestly, not all rabbits are voracious diggers or carpet destroyers. I only had one or two that occasionally went after the carpet. I've had more rabbits that never bothered it. But having a "disposable" area rug and perhaps an ex-pen to keep the rabbit on just that area rug would be a good option. Look for low pile... something that isn't tempting for bunny to grab a hold of with his teeth.
 
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Haven't looked over the list yet but wanted to comment about the area rug. That would be a good option. Honestly, not all rabbits are voracious diggers or carpet destroyers. I only had one or two that occasionally went after the carpet. I've had more rabbits that never bothered it. But having a "disposable" area rug and perhaps an ex-pen to keep the rabbit on just that area rug would be a good option. Look for low pile... something that isn't tempting for bunny to grab a hold of with his teeth.
Thank you!
 

peanutdabunny

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Looks like you took some advice from me ;) 😂 I love it!
I wonder why you need shampoo though?
I recommend one of those blue moving blankets you put on the floor so when you move furnature the floor wont be damaged. I love the shop timbervalleyrabbits! My rabbits FAVORITE toy is from there, its the stuffed willow ball!
 

peanutdabunny

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Here is the links to everything ;)
 

Mac189

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Rabbit emergencies are expensive man, it always pays to be prepared.

Insurence or a scratch pay account cuts the cost and risk down, but an emergency anywhere can wipe you out fast. A broken leg, severe infection, GI stasis... the minimum I always expect for a minor emergency is $300 (in all areas of life, but certainly rabbits). Most overnight emergency clinics cost $700 to $1000 just to be seen after hours if you live somewhere that even has such services available for rabbits.

During my time working at a veterinary hospital, I met MANY animals who were surrendered because they got hit by a car, broke a leg, etc., and the owners simply could not pay to have their pet treated anywhere.
 

Diane R

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Rabbit emergencies are expensive man, it always pays to be prepared.

Insurence or a scratch pay account cuts the cost and risk down, but an emergency anywhere can wipe you out fast. A broken leg, severe infection, GI stasis... the minimum I always expect for a minor emergency is $300 (in all areas of life, but certainly rabbits). Most overnight emergency clinics cost $700 to $1000 just to be seen after hours if you live somewhere that even has such services available for rabbits.

During my time working at a veterinary hospital, I met MANY animals who were surrendered because they got hit by a car, broke a leg, etc., and the owners simply could not pay to have their pet treated anywhere.
Exactly, diagnostics can be really expensive too. CT scans, etc. People should not be allowed to have pets if they can't afford vet care...
 

Preitler

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Exactly, diagnostics can be really expensive too. CT scans, etc. People should not be allowed to have pets if they can't afford vet care...
Oh snap.

Yeah, those people too poor to afford paying a in many regions ridiculously overpriced service industry really don't deserve having pets, it's for the posh people, not those have-nots, they can cuddle with a lump of coal instead :(

From staple food to luxury item in less then 2 generations. My grandparents had rabbits too, those were the meat on the sunday table.
There is so much people can do by themself in most cases, even more where you can get medicine by your own (difficult here), vets aren't magic. Even when using really expensive stuff it doesn't work wonders all the time, I get the feeling quite often it is used because it is there and people pay for it...

And people are even allowed to have kids without a financial background check or license, wouldn't that a place to start such arguing?

Sorry, said like that, it's a pretty cruel statement.
 

Apollo’s Slave

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I'm kind of going through the list now. Generally seems quite good :)

Here's what I'd change:

- kale, spinach, cabbage. These, individually, should be fed in limited quantities. Something like romaine lettuce, herbs, spring greens, pak choy, etc will be easier on the stomach, as they aren't so high in calcium and oxalates.

- personally, I wouldn't use a harness. There are quite a lot of risks (not saying it can't be done safely, but it will need to be done very carefully, and you might want to do some reading on it :))

- rabbits are clean animals, so unless they're living in unsanitary conditions or have a disability, they probably won't need shampoo. You can save that money for a new toy $$$

- I'm not too sure how big the kennel is but 8 hours (general school day? I think.) in the kennel is quite a long time. If you're able to bunny-proof the room, they could probably safely free-roam even when you're not home.

- $60 for a checkup sounds good. As mentioned, it'll be good to set up an emergency fund too - bunnies have fun ways to surprise us...

It all sounds really good though! Very lucky bunny(ies) 🥰
 

Mariam+Theo

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I agree with everything Apollo's Slave said! But, I also wanted to point out several things:
- Baby bunnies should not be fed Alfalfa Hay if they are also being fed an Alfalfa-based pellet. I personally would never feed a rabbit alfalfa hay because it will make the swap to grass hay much harder. Rabbits should be fed a limited amount (no free-feeding) of alfalfa pellets until they are 3-4 months old. At 4-5 months you should slowly begin introducing a high-quality timothy-based pellet (I suggest looking at Sherwood or Oxbow pellets). If you get a rabbit from a rescue the bunny will most likely already be eating Timothy pellets and grass hay. Just make sure the rescue gives you the rabbit's old food so you can transition the rabbit very slowly to the new food.

- I don't really see the need to use a hay rack. I put hay directly in the litter box and it works better. Some rabbits don't like Pine Pellet litter because it hurts their feet so the hay provides a soft cushion.

-DO NOT USE PEE PADS! Most rabbits will not chew them but if they do chew them you are in a really really really bad situation. Pee pads also don't work. I have tried them with Theo and they are just a pain.
 

Catlyn

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Pee pads depend on the rabbit, and on the setup. Musti never botheted with them, Lümi never bothered with them. Storm won't care about them either if it's in his litterbox lining. Left on the floor under the bowl, for example, he will be tempted to dig at it. It will inevitably get in his way and become an amusement item. Went on carrier vet trips with the liners and all was good.
I don't find them a hassle and they save me a lot of trouble when cleaning out-i can just dump the contents in the compost hole and throw the pad in the regular bin, more often than not i can just put another pad and pellets in without having to deepclean the box every time.
Although it isn't the most ecological way to go, it is more economical here, rather than washing a few fleece blankets every single day and fighting with the hay stuck to it.
So it all comes down to the rabbit.
 

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