Hi! Future bunny mom-have some questions!

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peanutdabunny

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Read this too, this person is not in the US though Here
Pet rabbits can eat grass from the yard provided that it's fresh and not treated with chemicals. Don't allow a rabbit to eat excessive grass immediately as her stomach needs to adjust to it. If you're going to clip some grass to feed your rabbit, you should use scissors
 

peanutdabunny

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Also this "
The answer is both potentially yes and no.

Firstly, a rabbit that is not used to eating grass all day may have stomach upsets as a result which could lead to gut stasis. If however you were feeding grass before letting her out all day and she was used to it, it should be fine. However slow introductions starting from 5-10 minutes at a time, once a day leading up to several hours over a couple of weeks would be the way to go.

Secondly, it's important to know what your grass is. Most backyard grasses are perfectly safe, however there can be certain weeds in lawns/gardens (plus common garden plants) that are fatal if ingested by a rabbit. Before I first let Bandit out in my yard, I did a lot of research on the plants in the garden and the weeds in my lawn before just letting him go at it. It took a lot of online research, double-checking of resources for rabbit-safe plants before I was confident to let him out there. In addition to this, if any pesticides or herbicides are used on the lawn, this could also have a bad effect on your rabbit.

The third factor which should also seriously be considered, is if you're letting your rabbit out for the whole day largely unsupervised, you need to be aware that there's a risk of predators taking your rabbit, whether it be a bird, cat, fox or other depending on your location.

While I certainly encourage people to have their rabbits exercise outside and feed on lawn in such a way, just take care in the way that it's done. If you've only just started letting your rabbit out on the lawn, it's likely why she is gorging herself because it's a new amazing food that she wants to eat as much of as possible before she gets shut away again. If you make the trips outdoors regular, it's possible that she won't immediately resort to eating as much as she can as quickly as she can"
 

BunbunBannana

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Also this "
The answer is both potentially yes and no.

Firstly, a rabbit that is not used to eating grass all day may have stomach upsets as a result which could lead to gut stasis. If however you were feeding grass before letting her out all day and she was used to it, it should be fine. However slow introductions starting from 5-10 minutes at a time, once a day leading up to several hours over a couple of weeks would be the way to go.

Secondly, it's important to know what your grass is. Most backyard grasses are perfectly safe, however there can be certain weeds in lawns/gardens (plus common garden plants) that are fatal if ingested by a rabbit. Before I first let Bandit out in my yard, I did a lot of research on the plants in the garden and the weeds in my lawn before just letting him go at it. It took a lot of online research, double-checking of resources for rabbit-safe plants before I was confident to let him out there. In addition to this, if any pesticides or herbicides are used on the lawn, this could also have a bad effect on your rabbit.

The third factor which should also seriously be considered, is if you're letting your rabbit out for the whole day largely unsupervised, you need to be aware that there's a risk of predators taking your rabbit, whether it be a bird, cat, fox or other depending on your location.

While I certainly encourage people to have their rabbits exercise outside and feed on lawn in such a way, just take care in the way that it's done. If you've only just started letting your rabbit out on the lawn, it's likely why she is gorging herself because it's a new amazing food that she wants to eat as much of as possible before she gets shut away again. If you make the trips outdoors regular, it's possible that she won't immediately resort to eating as much as she can as quickly as she can"
Thanks! And I will be watching the rabbit the WHOLE time.
 

BunbunBannana

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Do I have to neuter/spay and vaccinate the bunny. And is hot glue safe?
 
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Mac189

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Do I have to neuter/spay and vaccinate the bunny. And is hot glue safe?
I would HIGHLY recommend spaying and neutering, it tends to greatly improve rabbits' general behavior, prevents conditions that could crop up later in life, and is necessary if you were ever to consider getting a second rabbit as a bond. I tend to feel that the earlier you can get it done, the better. While you don't HAVE to spay or neuter, it will make you and your rabbit's life much easier in the long and short term, with few reasons not to.

In the US there aren't very many vaccines available for rabbits yet, but when the RHV2 vaccine does become available you should get it, always better to be safe than sorry.
 

peanutdabunny

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In CA I would get vaccinated, especially if your rabbit is going to eat grass from outside. There are cases in CA and it is spread through insects and wild rabbits
 

peanutdabunny

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Read this..
https://www.rabbitsonline.net/threads/different-types-of-hay-what-and-why.101991/post-1177180
However, there are specific things you need to watch out for. These are the things you need to consider to prevent it from becoming a negative activity which poses risks:

  • Has the grass been treated with any products or chemicals? Weed Killer and other Pesticide and Herbicides products can be fatal to a Rabbit if consumed.
  • Have other animals, pets been grazing or using the area in which the grass grows? Could they have urinated/excreted on it?
  • Have any wild animals been on/or use the grass?
  • Have you recently mowed the grass, or cut it down using a lawnmower?
  • Has your Rabbit consumed grass before? Has it been a significant part of their diet?
Source Can Rabbits Eat Grass? [This Is What You Must Be Careful Of]
 

Mac189

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What should I take the vaccinations for
In the US the only vaccine that I currently know of that is even slightly approved is the RHDV2 vaccine, which is only available in some regions right now, although will likely become more widespread soon.

Globally there are vaccines for RHDV 1 & 2, as well as myxomatosis, however, none of these are available in most of the US at this time. The bay area may have a little more availability simply due to having more highly specialized clinics than many other areas, so you may want to call a few clinics and see if they carry any vaccines.
 

Catlyn

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I I would have gotten 2 but my cage isn't big enough. When I switch to free roam, I will probably get another bun.
This is not an excuse, really. Take the reccommendations, get an xpen with whatever base cage you end up getting. If coupled with ample time to excersise out the pen as well, a pair of rabbits won't mind at all. I persoanlly believe that "double the rabbits, double the space" is a myth as my boys used to look extremely happy in their ~2 sq m pen with at least 6hrs extra roaming space.

A large-ish base cage, an xpen(or two) attached to it and at least 4hrs of roaming time in an even bigger, rabbit-proofed place. Only a few initial steps that can help you take a bonded pair from the shelter and forego all problems of rabbit puberty, fixing, doubling that and then bonding(if it works oht between any two rabbits). Just try to keep it simpler for yourself-find a way to create some extra space and get a bonded pair into a few xpens' worth of area and it should be all good in terms of space.
 

BunbunBannana

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This is not an excuse, really. Take the reccommendations, get an xpen with whatever base cage you end up getting. If coupled with ample time to excersise out the pen as well, a pair of rabbits won't mind at all. I persoanlly believe that "double the rabbits, double the space" is a myth as my boys used to look extremely happy in their ~2 sq m pen with at least 6hrs extra roaming space.

A large-ish base cage, an xpen(or two) attached to it and at least 4hrs of roaming time in an even bigger, rabbit-proofed place. Only a few initial steps that can help you take a bonded pair from the shelter and forego all problems of rabbit puberty, fixing, doubling that and then bonding(if it works oht between any two rabbits). Just try to keep it simpler for yourself-find a way to create some extra space and get a bonded pair into a few xpens' worth of area and it should be all good in terms of space.
I guess I can free roam them in my room... It's 60 square inches. would that work for 2?
 

Catlyn

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What's 60 square inches? The cage? Your room?
Did you mean square feet? 60squareinches is really, really small for whatever it is. No being can be housed in 60sqin spaces.
If you meant 60 square feet, then it is a very decent size and should be totally okay. (I use the metric system so i don't know what exactly it makes, the reccommended minimum was 60sqft i believe). Although we can all agree that bigger is better, if you really meant feet instead of inches, that size would be good.
 

BunbunBannana

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What's 60 square inches? The cage? Your room?
Did you mean square feet? 60squareinches is really, really small for whatever it is. No being can be housed in 60sqin spaces.
If you meant 60 square feet, then it is a very decent size and should be totally okay. (I use the metric system so i don't know what exactly it makes, the reccommended minimum was 60sqft i believe). Although we can all agree that bigger is better, if you really meant feet instead of inches, that size would be good.
Yes I meant sqare feet in my room.
 

peanutdabunny

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RHDV2 is a deadly diease no cure. I saw lennon the bunny get the vaccine in LA. If you are going to give your bunny grass I reccommend getting the vacciene. It is spread through insects and wild rabbits.
 

BunbunBannana

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What's 60 square inches? The cage? Your room?
Did you mean square feet? 60squareinches is really, really small for whatever it is. No being can be housed in 60sqin spaces.
If you meant 60 square feet, then it is a very decent size and should be totally okay. (I use the metric system so i don't know what exactly it makes, the reccommended minimum was 60sqft i believe). Although we can all agree that bigger is better, if you really meant feet instead of inches, that size would be good.
I don't think I can. My room is carpeted, so unless 2buns are ok with 30 sqr feet... the rabbits will get to see other buns tho, as we have friends with bunnies.
 

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