Hi! Future bunny mom-have some questions!

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BunbunBannana

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BunBun71

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peanutdabunny

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Bunnies like to chewbunnies end up chewing plastic


baby bunny ≈ sensitive tummy


bunnies end up chewing plastic + sensitive tummy ≈ Very sick bunny with GI stasis
 

BunbunBannana

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Well, no, that's not nearly 60 square ft! It's 21 sq ft. about a third of the space needed.
I only intend to use it for around half a year, then switch to free roam. Plus It will be 2 stories, so 42 cubic feet, and it will still be a baby.
 

peanutdabunny

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I get where you are coming from, you want to spend less money.
You arent going to be around all day, bunnies love to cause trouble when you are gone, you gotta love them haha
But instead of you spending $7 for the ceramic bowl, you are spending close to 1k to save your bunny from GI stasis.
Preventive measures, not treatment is what you want to aim for
 

BunbunBannana

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I get where you are coming from, you want to spend less money.
You arent going to be around all day, bunnies love to cause trouble when you are gone, you gotta love them haha
But instead of you spending $7 for the ceramic bowl, you are spending close to 1k to save your bunny from GI stasis.
Preventive measures, not treatment is what you want to aim for
Ok
 

Catlyn

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I get where you are coming from, you want to spend less money.
You arent going to be around all day, bunnies love to cause trouble when you are gone, you gotta love them haha
But instead of you spending $7 for the ceramic bowl, you are spending close to 1k to save your bunny from GI stasis.
Preventive measures, not treatment is what you want to aim for
Sorry for the long read, i've thrown in quite a lot of my own personal experiences as reference.

I totally agree.
If you don't want to go for a ceramic dish, or want one that will never be tipped over, and won't be really interesting to the rabbit, look around for a lock-and-crock dish. I have one for Storm since he's a tosser-digger rabbit, he's never managed to flip it once. Although the one i have for him is plastic, it is big and "fat", hence not chewable and holding plenty of water. It has lasted me for more than a year and it only cost about 5€

If you do plan on getting a rabbit after all the educational text thrown at you, do get an adult bonded pair from a shelter instead of a single baby from a breeder.
*a pair of rabbits is always better(save for maybe 1% of rabbits that just won't take any rabbit pal) -people can never fully fulfill a bun's need for a same-species buddy. A bonded pair will also have an easier time for vet trips, moving or furniture swap. I had a solo rabbit(Musti), then had a duo of them(Storm&Lümi), now back to a solo bun(Storm). Even though the pair was largely unbonded, Storm has kinda flipped since Lümi's passing and he took moving quite hard(did great when he moved together w Lümi) I can see the changes in him and i am just not the right type of company he truly needs. He'll be fine with us, but i guarantee, he would much rather have another rabbit groom him instead of me. Bonded rabbits are also known to live happier, and sometimes even longer. So whatever you do, better get a pair.
*shelter rabbits are already fixed and vaccinated, have had their health checked and some degree of personality assessmsnt, also socializing training. This means no nasty behavious like humping, grunting, spraying, excessive destruction&aggression, running away from your hands, and also a huuuge decrease in the risk of reproductive cancers. Fixed rabbits are better in litter training and are generally calmer. Health-checked and vaccinated rabbits are a rarer sight in breeders' rabbits.
Adult rabbits have developed their personality, so it is easier to get what you see, and thus, better plan what toys to get and make for your new fellows.
*there is such an overpopulation of rabbits who are in need of good homes, until that situation goes away, there is no need to go to a breeder and fuel the flames. (Not saying that all breeders are bad, some do breed rabbits specifically to have great pet-traits, but most that i've heard of are not so great.)
It is generally a much better idea to get a duo from a shelter, if it is possible. Pretty sure it's the case for all the folks in Australia, USA and UK, not at all here in Estonia and any other place not so great in rabbit care (Pakistan is another example and the Philippines have also popped up in those discussions)


Also, one thing to consider if you're a minor-does everyone in your household want a pair of rabbits? Are they on the same page with you in terms of how to care for them? Who will be funding any costs, especially the vet bills? Annual vaccines and general health checks, and quite big vet bills depending on the ailment your rabbits may be stuck with. Musti had a knee abcess and in attempt to find the cause and cure it, in 6 months i had coughed up nearly 500€ for all the xrays, antibiotics, painkillers, driving costs and any other miscellaneous payments(including neuter; 45€ is cheap here, you probably won't find any experienced clinic doing it for that cheap. Spays go even further, our minimum is 75€). All in vain as he had to cross the bridge since the abcess had taken his quality of life. Lümi had pastuerella, fought three months with antibiotics, treated many bouts of gas and chaffed skin, also around 200€, he still ended up dying suddenly. Both were young and had been healthy. Long story short, do be aware that vet bills for annuals aren't too expensive, about 50€, but the running costs are whopping.
You might have to consider insurance.
When i started my rabbit journey, we were on the same page on how to care for my boy, but as time moved and i gained more knowledge, my parents didn't, so we've had a fair share of struggles with that. I vented about it in December, i believe, i'll find it and add the link to it, might be an interesting heads-up read on what may lie ahead if your parents don't agree with you. Just on a side-note, things have gotten much better on my end, i believe that was the worst i'd had in caring for my rabbits.
 

Ashrocks92

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What litter do u guys use we use paper stuff for the bedding and stuff also tractor supply here is cheaper than PetSmart for rabbit stuff gonna shop there for now on
 

bunny34422

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(Didn't read the whole thread, sorry if I missed something but just wanted to add) babies need a lot of room too, I'd say that my boy was very active as a baby and loved having a big room to himself. Always binkying and zooming around. If you're talking about whether or not the c&c grid cage you have is big enough, I've heard that they prefer more floor space rather than stories/levels. The good thing about c&c grids is that you can change the height and shape whenever you want so you can adjust it if needed. Though if you get a jumper you may need more to make it higher, my boy is such an escape artist and has climbed over 2 and 3 ft pens, lol
 

MiloTheBunny101

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Looks good to me! But remember your going to have to slowly bond with your rabbit! Maybe leaving it in the cage for a couple of days. If you want i could link some bonding video?
 

peanutdabunny

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Looks good to me! But remember your going to have to slowly bond with your rabbit! Maybe leaving it in the cage for a couple of days. If you want i could link some bonding video?
I wouldnt leave the bunny in the cage for a few days, I would sit next to the cage and have treats in your hand, and let the bunny come out themself
 

BunbunBannana

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I plan on getting the bunny in the cage and leaving it alone for the rest of the day, and then coming in to climb to bed and leave it alone for the night. In the morning, I will start letting it out.
 

BunbunBannana

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Sorry for the long read, i've thrown in quite a lot of my own personal experiences as reference.

I totally agree.
If you don't want to go for a ceramic dish, or want one that will never be tipped over, and won't be really interesting to the rabbit, look around for a lock-and-crock dish. I have one for Storm since he's a tosser-digger rabbit, he's never managed to flip it once. Although the one i have for him is plastic, it is big and "fat", hence not chewable and holding plenty of water. It has lasted me for more than a year and it only cost about 5€

If you do plan on getting a rabbit after all the educational text thrown at you, do get an adult bonded pair from a shelter instead of a single baby from a breeder.
*a pair of rabbits is always better(save for maybe 1% of rabbits that just won't take any rabbit pal) -people can never fully fulfill a bun's need for a same-species buddy. A bonded pair will also have an easier time for vet trips, moving or furniture swap. I had a solo rabbit(Musti), then had a duo of them(Storm&Lümi), now back to a solo bun(Storm). Even though the pair was largely unbonded, Storm has kinda flipped since Lümi's passing and he took moving quite hard(did great when he moved together w Lümi) I can see the changes in him and i am just not the right type of company he truly needs. He'll be fine with us, but i guarantee, he would much rather have another rabbit groom him instead of me. Bonded rabbits are also known to live happier, and sometimes even longer. So whatever you do, better get a pair.
*shelter rabbits are already fixed and vaccinated, have had their health checked and some degree of personality assessmsnt, also socializing training. This means no nasty behavious like humping, grunting, spraying, excessive destruction&aggression, running away from your hands, and also a huuuge decrease in the risk of reproductive cancers. Fixed rabbits are better in litter training and are generally calmer. Health-checked and vaccinated rabbits are a rarer sight in breeders' rabbits.
Adult rabbits have developed their personality, so it is easier to get what you see, and thus, better plan what toys to get and make for your new fellows.
*there is such an overpopulation of rabbits who are in need of good homes, until that situation goes away, there is no need to go to a breeder and fuel the flames. (Not saying that all breeders are bad, some do breed rabbits specifically to have great pet-traits, but most that i've heard of are not so great.)
It is generally a much better idea to get a duo from a shelter, if it is possible. Pretty sure it's the case for all the folks in Australia, USA and UK, not at all here in Estonia and any other place not so great in rabbit care (Pakistan is another example and the Philippines have also popped up in those discussions)


Also, one thing to consider if you're a minor-does everyone in your household want a pair of rabbits? Are they on the same page with you in terms of how to care for them? Who will be funding any costs, especially the vet bills? Annual vaccines and general health checks, and quite big vet bills depending on the ailment your rabbits may be stuck with. Musti had a knee abcess and in attempt to find the cause and cure it, in 6 months i had coughed up nearly 500€ for all the xrays, antibiotics, painkillers, driving costs and any other miscellaneous payments(including neuter; 45€ is cheap here, you probably won't find any experienced clinic doing it for that cheap. Spays go even further, our minimum is 75€). All in vain as he had to cross the bridge since the abcess had taken his quality of life. Lümi had pastuerella, fought three months with antibiotics, treated many bouts of gas and chaffed skin, also around 200€, he still ended up dying suddenly. Both were young and had been healthy. Long story short, do be aware that vet bills for annuals aren't too expensive, about 50€, but the running costs are whopping.
You might have to consider insurance.
When i started my rabbit journey, we were on the same page on how to care for my boy, but as time moved and i gained more knowledge, my parents didn't, so we've had a fair share of struggles with that. I vented about it in December, i believe, i'll find it and add the link to it, might be an interesting heads-up read on what may lie ahead if your parents don't agree with you. Just on a side-note, things have gotten much better on my end, i believe that was the worst i'd had in caring for my rabbits.
I I would have gotten 2 but my cage isn't big enough. When I switch to free roam, I will probably get another bun.
 

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