Help with rabbit housing

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melodielove

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Hi!
I am thinking of getting two mini lop bunnies and putting them outdoors because my parents don't allow indoor pets, and they don't want pets to poop and pee in the grass as well. Anyways, I am thinking of getting the omlet rabbit run set up exactly like the picture (its someone's picture on google), except I am not sure how to install the tiles or flooring. I am not familiar with construction of any kind (don't even have a hammer at home), and I don't know how to install the flooring, or what type of flooring would work. Does anyone know what type of flooring is best for the bunnies, so they can't chew through and escape? Also, I would like to know, if the omlet housing can withstand thunderstorms? Thanks! rabbit.jpg
 

Blue eyes

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A few thoughts to consider...

It would be helpful for you to post your general location on your profile. Knowing the country and state or province will let us know what kind of climate you have. Not all climates are suitable for outdoor housing and some places have unique environmental challenges.

The grid openings on the structure in the photo are rather large and could pose a danger. If you notice, they compensated for this by wrapping the lower portion with wiring that has smaller openings. You can see other possibilities for housing at the following thread:

The easiest would probably be to use pavers or concrete blocks for the flooring as shown in the photos at the link above.

The tarp they use for the roof could be problematic. Again, where you live will factor in. Where I live, for example, we have wind gusts that would send such a structure flying away in no time. Also having just the roof covered won't offer protection from driving rain (blowing sideways).

On another note, if you are interested in having a pair of rabbits, I'd strongly suggest not getting too set on any one particular breed. The reason for this is that if you want a pair, it is best to get that pair from a rabbit rescue. There they have pairs that are already bonded and already fixed. They may or may not have mini lop pairs or perhaps just one of the pair will be a mini lop. But more importantly, you'll want to choose based on personality. Meet their rabbits and see which ones you are drawn to and which seem to like you too.

If you are new to rabbits, you may not know that the last thing you want to do is get 2 baby rabbits. That would lead only to frustration. Baby rabbits only get along while they are babies. As early as 10 weeks of age, their hormones can kick in and that can make them fight. Rabbit fights can be vicious and bloody. Once hormones kick in they would need to be separated (housed in 2 separate areas) until they are old enough to neuter/spay. Then you'd have to consider whether your parents would be willing to spend the money on 2 spays -- both rabbits must be fixed. Again, depending on where you live, spay costs can be crazy. In my area, they run around $250 per spay. Others on the forum said their area charges $400/spay.

After the spay, they need another month to heal. Then they get re-introduced to each other again. Being fixed will increase their chances of bonding, but there will be no guarantee that they will actually get along and bond. If they don't, then you're stuck with having to house them both separately. So this is why it is much, much better to begin with a pair of rabbits that have already been fixed and have already been bonded.
 

melodielove

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Thank you for the advice. It was really helpful, and really opened my mind to all sorts of issues that I never thought about. I guess I will consider indoor bunnies after I move out from my parents' place. I just think baby bunnies are cuter but I guess adult bonded bunnies work well too.
 
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