Help! Bunny gave birth unexpected

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Selena RD

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I got a male and female 2 weeks ago and they said they were always separated but doesn't look like it cause yesterday she gave birth to 4 of them and fed 3 of them at 8am yesterday so is that okay? how long they haven't been fed and also she doesn't move much and eats very little and drinks a lot and no poops from her just urine. so did anyone else have a experience that the mom hasn't move much for the first day?
 

JBun

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No, that's not ok that she's not moving or eating, and not getting back to normal. It indicates a likely health issue, and a critical one. She could have pregnancy toxemia from low blood sugar levels(hypoglycemia) or possibly low blood calcium levels(hypocalcemia). Both are extremely dangerous and can be fatal. There are other possible pregnancy complications that could be causing her lethargy and lack of appetite, but hypoglycemia and/or hypocalcemia would be the most common and likely.

If it is this and she still is alert and taking things orally, and her condition isn't too severe yet, I know some breeders will crush up a tums, mix with water and syringe it orally to help restore sugar and calcium levels. However, if it's progressed too far, then immediate vet intervention to administer the glucose and calcium is necessary, as it will need to be given by IV.


Hypocalcemia in rabbits

Another possibility for the mom not doing well can be a uterine infection developing after giving birth, or other post pregnancy complications. And these require immediate vet intervention.

As for the kits, they need to have been fed by the first 36 hours after being born. But if mom is having problems, it may become necessary to start hand feeding. This is a last resort though because risks of them aspirating from hand feeding are high, so I would only do it as a last resort to help save the mother rabbit if her health is compromised.

 

Preitler

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Hm, right, normally they bounce back pretty quickly. That she fed them is kinda good, that she isn't active by now not. I use powdered egg shells (cooked to desinfect, coffee blender) that I sprinkle over their dampened pellets to make sure they get enough calcium, can't hurt in that situation. Got that from reading about breeding dogs, and had no Tums available.

I also would look her over, if something looks off, I got a 7yo doe emergency spayed this year after an accidential pregnancy and a stuck kit...

Good luck.
 
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Selena RD

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No, that's not ok that she's not moving or eating, and not getting back to normal. It indicates a likely health issue, and a critical one. She could have pregnancy toxemia from low blood sugar levels(hypoglycemia) or possibly low blood calcium levels(hypocalcemia). Both are extremely dangerous and can be fatal. There are other possible pregnancy complications that could be causing her lethargy and lack of appetite, but hypoglycemia and/or hypocalcemia would be the most common and likely.

If it is this and she still is alert and taking things orally, and her condition isn't too severe yet, I know some breeders will crush up a tums, mix with water and syringe it orally to help restore sugar and calcium levels. However, if it's progressed too far, then immediate vet intervention to administer the glucose and calcium is necessary, as it will need to be given by IV.


Hypocalcemia in rabbits

Another possibility for the mom not doing well can be a uterine infection developing after giving birth, or other post pregnancy complications. And these require immediate vet intervention.

As for the kits, they need to have been fed by the first 36 hours after being born. But if mom is having problems, it may become necessary to start hand feeding. This is a last resort though because risks of them aspirating from hand feeding are high, so I would only do it as a last resort to help save the mother rabbit if her health is compromised.

She fed all 4 around 4am and she ate pellets some kale and parsley but we one of kits got cold under their nest and passed away we tried to warm the baby up with a heating pad and warm water but it didn't come back and they have a heating pad in there I hope I'm doing it right and it turn off every 30 minutes then back on. on low with towel over it and I can hear some growls from her stomach so I guess I have to massage her tummy and I'll try the tums too and she keeps eat something from her behind too
 

JBun

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Make sure to only have the heating pad under part of the nest so that if they get too hot they can move to the cooler part and not overheat. I'm glad mom bun is doing better. You'll want to make sure she is getting plenty of food, particularly high calcium foods. Make sure she's eating, at least an adequate amount. If she isn't eating very much on her own then I would start syringe feeds.
 

Selena RD

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Make sure to only have the heating pad under part of the nest so that if they get too hot they can move to the cooler part and not overheat. I'm glad mom bun is doing better. You'll want to make sure she is getting plenty of food, particularly high calcium foods. Make sure she's eating, at least an adequate amount. If she isn't eating very much on her own then I would start syringe feeds.
Yeah I have it only half of the nest box any advice on taking care of the kits and I just give her the babies in dusk/dawn cause she keeps uncovering them
 

JBun

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I would take the nest box out too in that case. Just check on them several times a day, make sure mom feeds them and they have full bellies when you put them in with her for nursing time, and make sure she is stimulating them to urinate. Make sure she is getting and eating plenty of food, some of it being high in calcium and protein. When the kits start eating solid foods, check their bum at least twice a day, for any mushy or dried on poop over the anal opening. Good quality soft grass hay is the best food for kits to start eating(easiest on their digestion). There are more tips in this link below.

 

Selena RD

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Update on the kits and mom well, the kits been doing good and she's been feeding them twice a day and she still has gas ate some hay & kale & lettuce moves around more but still in a stiff position sometimes and she had a big brown stain on her bottom like diarrhea but didn't smell like it odd but after that one time she never had again and now doing she medium size poops and drinks a lot and eats pellets I hope she's back to normal soon
 

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