Formed soft poop

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My rabbit Tenoch gets soft formed poop. Sometimes during the day not to bad from what I can tell. But it seems like when he gets mad at me he has it more. An example is tonight I had to give him a bath because he is a sprayer and gets pee all over him and starts smelling. After I dried him and combed him he runs off and grooms himself. Then he starts walking around and pooping soft poop around the house.

Is this in my head or is he acting out? I tell him how it annoys me. Luckily we have tiles and when they get smooched I can scrub it off.
 

jamesedwardwaller

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My rabbit Tenoch gets soft formed poop. Sometimes during the day not to bad from what I can tell. But it seems like when he gets mad at me he has it more. An example is tonight I had to give him a bath because he is a sprayer and gets pee all over him and starts smelling. After I dried him and combed him he runs off and grooms himself. Then he starts walking around and pooping soft poop around the house.

Is this in my head or is he acting out? I tell him how it annoys me. Luckily we have tiles and when they get smooched I can scrub it off.
dear mommy of tenoch,-this may be as easy as offering more timothy-grasses/fiber into the diet,--here is a link which will explain better http://www.bio.miami.edu/hare/poop.html --sincerely james waller:runningrabbit:
 

amandaaaa_xxo

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Soft poop and deformed poop are all indicators of low fibre. Feed him more hay :) and refresh the hay a few times a day because rabbits can tell between 'old' and new food.
 
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I was giving him timothy hay but he did not eat it. I tried several different types. I can only get him to eat most of is alfalfa. He does not eat the hard thicker pieces. I spoke to his vet about it and he said as long as he also has timothy hay pellets it is fine. But he did not have much hay the day before we were almost out and I order some new and it arrived the next day.

It just seems he gets the soft poop the most when he is irritated about something.
 

amandaaaa_xxo

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Alfalfa hay is much sweeter I believe and rabbits tend to munch on sweeter foods. It's like offering a child with candy or vegetables. Which do you think the child would choose? Same with rabbits. To try encouraging him to eat Timothy hay because of its higher fibre content, try mixing it with the alfalfa hay, or spraying it with apple juice to get him moving.

My personal experience with my rabbit having soft poo is low fibre. And right now actually he is dropping what almost looks like 'wetter' and darker faeces pellets. This is because he had dental surgery three weeks ago and is unable to chew his hay to date due to the soreness. Because he hasn't had fibre for a few weeks, his poo changed in texture and in form.

Try getting your rabbit to eat grass? But as the vet said, as long as there is Timothy hay and pellets available, don't be too concerned. Your rabbit will eventually eat those. Are there any other behaviours present for when he is irritated?

Also, has he eaten Timothy hay BEFORE? And all of a sudden he isn't? May you please clarify this? Thanks

Contact the vet again if his poo transforms to runny stool (diarrhea).
 
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amandaaaa_xxo

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Forgot to mention, a diet too high in sugars and carbohydrates can cause soft poo. Perhaps trying to limit the pellets to smaller quantities (1/4 cup) and avoid giving surgery treats and fruits for a while may revert the soft poo to normal. See how you go with this?

Make sure he is hydrated too.
 
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Forgot to mention, a diet too high in sugars and carbohydrates can cause soft poo. Perhaps trying to limit the pellets to smaller quantities (1/4 cup) and avoid giving surgery treats and fruits for a while may revert the soft poo to normal. See how you go with this?

Make sure he is hydrated too.
I tried mixing the timothy hay with different hays and he would not eat it or pick out what he likes. He gets his pellets from 7 pm on and not to much. He is a very active rabbit. Someone moves in the house he is following. He likes to chase me and slide to a stop by me.
 

amandaaaa_xxo

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Thanks for the reply :) he sounds like a fussy eater! Same with my rabbit. I'm sorry but I'm not too sure what else could contribute to soft poop. I'm only aware of a low fibre diet and too much sugars, fruits and carbohydrates. If the matter does progress worse in which I hope it doesn't, it's probably best to allow the vet to do a faeces sample test to determine the underlying cause.

Just touching note on the mixture of hay. How are you mixing his hay? Are you doing the slow transition? If he's been used to eating alfalfa hay and all of a sudden you put a bunch of Timothy hay, because his digestive system is used to alfalfa, he won't eat the other hay. Perhaps over the course of a few days or 2 weeks, increase the quantity of the Timothy hay and decrease the quantity of the alfalfa hay (to avoid stomach issues). Some people don't do a transition with hay but it's always best to transition with any food to prevent an upset of their stomach.

Sorry I couldn't help any further !
 
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JBun

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Are the soft poops you are seeing, his cecotropes and are they normally formed like a blackberry cluster or are they pasty at all? Or is it the fecal poop that is soft? How often are you seeing it and how long has this been going on? What is your rabbits exact diet like? With regards to the lack of hay eating, is it that he won't eat any hay, just won't eat the hard pieces, and/or will only eat a particular type of hay? When the vet checked him, did the vet do a very thorough dental exam, and is your vet an experienced rabbit vet?
 

amandaaaa_xxo

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When the vet checked him, did the vet do a very thorough dental exam, and is your vet an experienced rabbit vet?
Excellent point out! Not all vets have properly examined the body of a rabbit during their training years thus limiting their knowledge on rabbit health. When I went to the vet because of my rabbits drool, she checked his teeth (mind you, she did it freely without scopes) she told me he had healthy teeth and couldn't find the reason for his drool. She even brought out a text book to read in front of me... However, when I went to RABBIT SPECILIAST (it's amazing how these people actually exist) the doctor took her scope and looked inside his mouth and said "ahh now how can the vet clearly dismiss this problem here? He has pointy teeth causing little cuts on his tongue therefore causing his dribble". That's when I then booked a dental surgery for him to file down the teeth.

Please make sure that when seeing a vet, that they are actually experienced with rabbits. Most vets are just for dogs and cats to be honest.
 
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Are the soft poops you are seeing, his cecotropes and are they normally formed like a blackberry cluster or are they pasty at all? Or is it the fecal poop that is soft? How often are you seeing it and how long has this been going on? What is your rabbits exact diet like? With regards to the lack of hay eating, is it that he won't eat any hay, just won't eat the hard pieces, and/or will only eat a particular type of hay? When the vet checked him, did the vet do a very thorough dental exam, and is your vet an experienced rabbit vet?
They are more or less like the blackberry cluster. Maybe once a month at night, mostly I feel when he is upset at me (lol) because he got a bath. Ever since he came to us is how long. My husbands friend found him in front of a tow yard. He was not mature when we got him. We had him about 2 weeks when we knew for sure he was a boy. He has a bowl of fresh water every day. Kale, romaine, 4 baby carrots, hay, cilantro, Italian parsley. He will not eat the hard pieces in hay. He did not eat any of the timothy hay. I have found alfalfa is the hay he will eat the most of. I am not sure about the dental exam. He felt his jaw and looked at his teeth. He is a rabbit doctor I found on House Rabbit Society and the Miami Dade chapter website. He has his fecal matter checked regularly. He seems to be a happy vicious little rabbit.
 

flemishwhite

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Just some comments when you see what looks like soft poop from your bunny. It may not be poop. It may be a Cecum pellet, also known as cecotropes. A very important stomach ..rabbits have two stomachs...for a rabbit is the Cecum stomach. It's the stomach where a bacterial brew transforms plant cellulose into glucose. They glucose feeds the bacteria and the excess glucose feeds the rabbit. At least once a day, the Cecum stomach is purged to prevent material that cannot be digested from accumulating. In most vegetarian animals, this is regurgitated into the mouth to be re-chewed and swallowed again...like cows eating their cud. Unfortunately for rabbits, the Cecum stomach is at the juncture of the small intestine and large intestine. (In humans its the vestigal organ known as the appendix) The only way out from the Cecum is through the large intestine and out the rectum. A healthy bunny knows when the pellet is coming out, and they will bend over and eat it. You will normally never know that your rabbit is expelling a Cecum pellet and eating it. The problem is that for an old bunny they may have spinal authritis and it's too painful to bend down and eat the pellet. That's when you will see the pellet. Since a litter box bunny does not think this is poop, the pellet may be deposited anywhere..on the carpet, couch, etc. also, unfortunately the pellet can get stuck in their fur and when it gets mooshed out and dries, it will interfere with their ability to pee and poop.

When your rabbit is setting down, take your hand and run it up underneath their butt and feel for a Cecum pellet mass. Don't be queesy , it's not really poop. If a Cecum pellet is matted in the fur, take a wet towel and rub it off.
The Cecum pellet has liver enzymes in it and has a vomitous smell....which the rabbits normally eat if they can bend over to reach it.

My two Flemmish babies are white. Their butts are perfectly clean. They are obviously eating their cecum pellets every day.
 
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