Flesh Condition

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Estuko

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Ok so I have this buck who does bad on the show table because of a flesh condition. You rub your hand down his back and can feel his spine.

Most breeders tell me to give him dewormer which we have done. He gets plenty of food! He loves his food and he loves his water. I was told to try giving him oats and that didnt help.

I just cant seem to get this fixed. Does anyone have any suggestions?
 

tonyshuman

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Calf manna? I have no idea. I think you might get better responses in the Rabbitry, I'll move it for you if that's ok. Maybe he needs more exercise to build up muscle along the spine?
 

bunnybunbunb

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How long did you give the oats? Oats will help with condition, trust me. It has to be given just a little each day and every day. If you give lots just here and there they will get fat, not muscle mass.

I mix and use corn, oats and barley. I know an ex-french lop breeder who fed "cob" which is corn, oats and barley. She had great luck with condition and breeding, so I started a while ago. I mix it with pellets for Dillan everyday. I give it to rabbits lacking condition, pregnant rabbits or ones I want to soon breed. Just give it sparingly. It will help though.

Have you used Wheatgerm Oil? I keep it around, also, for pregnant, ill/thin, and soon to breed rabbits. It says it is for dogs for breeding but many breeders use it for their rabbits.
 

tonyshuman

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I really worry about corn kernels because I have heard too many horror stories of bunnies getting a GI impaction, and the owner finding out after the necropsy that the belly was full of the corn kernels that had accumulated there over years. I know some breeders use it with no ill effects but many sell their bunnies by age 3, and this shows up in older rabbits, even if they weren't fed a ton of corn.
 

SilverBirchRabbitry

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I would suggest Fat and Fiber horse feed, it works like a charm ;) Also corn and yugurt treats every now and again lol You will have a fatter bunny soon enough though if you use fat and fiber horse feed :) I give it to my Jersey Wooley doe because she is skinny, she is showing signs of a better coat and is getting heavier :)
 

tonyshuman

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I guess crack corn would probably be better. There was a thread about it a little while ago but I can't find it now. I was under the impression that it was that very tip part--the spot where the kernel attaches to the cob--that's the indigestible problem.
 

bunnybunbunb

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Oh, makes sence. I can get crack corn. Actually, that is what I ment him to get but he got the wrong one and he was so frazzled and busy so I did not say anything. I can easily feel part of it to my chicken and crack the other before I give it. I do have a hammer :p
 

pamnock

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tonyshuman wrote:
Calf manna? I have no idea. I think you might get better responses in the Rabbitry, I'll move it for you if that's ok. Maybe he needs more exercise to build up muscle along the spine?

Calf manna is too high in protein and can adversely effect condition by causing rough flesh condition and continual molt.

Rather than increase protein, many breeders have good luck slightly increasing fat (such as black oil sunflower seeds) or by using grains that build flesh condition withouthigh amounts of fat (oats are a good choice).

Primarily genetics govern how well the rabbit is muscled and how well it will hold condition. You can't make a silk purse out of a sows ear - no matter what type of condition you feed : )

Pam
 

Estuko

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Well, turns out I was giving him "quick" oats and not "traditional" oats. I guess there is a difference? XD So I'm gonna give that a shot.

I have started to him yogurt treats so would be interested to see if that'll do anything. Wouldnt it just fatten him up?

Pam - I was starting to think that it might just be his type? His mother was a 8 pound rabbit! While his dad was of normal size maybe he takes after his mom and requires more food then most mini lops? My other minis get the same amount of food and are fine.

I'm going to give the oats a shot again and this time use the right kind! I hope it helps because he has great type, just the stupid flesh condition pulls him back.
 

Luv-bunniz

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Estuko wrote:
Well, turns out I was giving him "quick" oats and not "traditional" oats. I guess there is a difference? XD So I'm gonna give that a shot.

I have started to him yogurt treats so would be interested to see if that'll do anything. Wouldnt it just fatten him up?

Pam - I was starting to think that it might just be his type? His mother was a 8 pound rabbit! While his dad was of normal size maybe he takes after his mom and requires more food then most mini lops? My other minis get the same amount of food and are fine.

I'm going to give the oats a shot again and this time use the right kind! I hope it helps because he has great type, just the stupid flesh condition pulls him back.
Big difference, quick oats should be avoided at all costs. ;)

I personally wouldn't give any animal yoghurt treats, apart from being full of rubbish they contain a high lactose-to-lactase ratio.
 

Estuko

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Why do you say to avoid quick oats? Is there something wrong with them? ):
 

pamnock

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I often use quick oats - however, the more refined a grain is, the less nutritious it is. Steamed rolled oats from the feed store are a better choice, but may be sold in amounts too large for you to use up in a reasonable amount of time.

Pam
 

pamnock

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Estuko wrote:
Well, turns out I was giving him "quick" oats and not "traditional" oats. I guess there is a difference? XD So I'm gonna give that a shot.

I have started to him yogurt treats so would be interested to see if that'll do anything. Wouldnt it just fatten him up?

Pam - I was starting to think that it might just be his type? His mother was a 8 pound rabbit! While his dad was of normal size maybe he takes after his mom and requires more food then most mini lops? My other minis get the same amount of food and are fine.

I'm going to give the oats a shot again and this time use the right kind! I hope it helps because he has great type, just the stupid flesh condition pulls him back.

I wouldn't use the yogurt treats. Your best bet is to simply try increasing his pellet ration and add a little oats.

Pam
 

Luv-bunniz

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I would never use quick oats due to them expanding. If you're only using a pinch of two it should be OK, but any more I would stay well away.
 

tonyshuman

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That's a bit of a myth, like that birds that eat rice will explode. These things take water and a bit of heat in order to expand. If you just get oatmeal wet, it will soak up some water, but not really expand so much, same with rice.
 

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