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Zaiya

Allison
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Thankx! What's that mean? A mix
Between to breeds?
There are five different body types: commercial, compact, full-arch, semi-arch, and cylindrical. Full-arch, cylindrical and semi-arch aren't very common, with only one of a few breeds representing each type. The most common are compact (breeds such as Holland lop, Netherland dwarf, and more) and commercial (breeds such as New Zealand, Californian, and more).

On that ARBA website, for a good example of each body type, look at these breeds:

Commercial: New Zealand
Compact: Mini Lop
Semi-arch: American
Full-arch: English Spot
Cylindrical: Hymalayan

https://www.arba.net/breeds.htm
 

woahlookitsme

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All broken rabbits will have some variance of a line down the spine. In the english spot this lines is supposed to go from the neck to the tip of the tail. English spots are a full arch rabbit (meaning they have thinner, longer bone and a more tucked up look showing a nice full arch in the profile with plenty of daylight underneath). They are a running breed which means they're disposition is sort of like tans. They are more active and some can have an attitude. Spots are to have a sweeping spot distribution with smaller spots starting above and sweeping like an S as they get bigger towards the rump. The English spot has a very specific pattern and markings. They have been bred since the early 1900's and there is little variation in their looks. I do not know what a spot mix would look like but I would not guess it as the first thing I see when there is a black and white broken rabbit in question. Like in the video I made there are 16 other breeds that have the same spine marking but they are not spots. To be an english spot or even an english spot mix they need to have more things than just a spine marking.
 

RabbitGirl101

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All broken rabbits will have some variance of a line down the spine. In the english spot this lines is supposed to go from the neck to the tip of the tail. English spots are a full arch rabbit (meaning they have thinner, longer bone and a more tucked up look showing a nice full arch in the profile with plenty of daylight underneath). They are a running breed which means they're disposition is sort of like tans. They are more active and some can have an attitude. Spots are to have a sweeping spot distribution with smaller spots starting above and sweeping like an S as they get bigger towards the rump. The English spot has a very specific pattern and markings. They have been bred since the early 1900's and there is little variation in their looks. I do not know what a spot mix would look like but I would not guess it as the first thing I see when there is a black and white broken rabbit in question. Like in the video I made there are 16 other breeds that have the same spine marking but they are not spots. To be an english spot or even an english spot mix they need to have more things than just a spine marking.
Like I stated before I know these things. However, it was just a start, or lead if you prefer to call it that. From this point you can grow and expand off of it. This rabbit(if a mix) wouldn't have a full arch she was probably bred to a commercial breed or compact breed.
I watched your video and it is true those are all broken rabbit. This difference with this rabbit even though it was not a solid line. The line on the english spot, checkered giant, ect. Is a lot smaller, more narrow than other broken pattern spine markings.

If you look at this picture of my Holland lop kit you can see the line down the spine. However it is not as straight, or narrow as it would be on a english spot.


If you look at an earlier picture of the kit, you can see the line is even more identical to what an English spots would be. However keep in mind the line will grow. (kit on far left)


What I'm trying to say is that yes the markings do look similar to an English Spots however they still aren't the same, the line is too thick and the spotting isn't the same.

The rabbit in this thread may not have prefect markings however the marking are very similar to the English Spots. The line down the back is very thin, narrow and only on the spine (The line however is broken, which I have seen purebred English Spots with broken lines, down the back. This is something that automatically make them a pet.) If it was from a pet store there is a chance is was the pet quality rabbit from a breeder. As to the body type like stated before this rabbit is most likely a mix, so the chance of the body being a full arch is very slim especially if the rabbits parent was bred to a commercial, or compact body type.

So yes I understand the brokens do look like English Spots in their markings sometimes, however the English Spots are more defined in their markings. This is just my opinion though, and its based off of what I have seen with the Brokens compared to English Spot,ect.
 

woahlookitsme

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I understand how the rabbit looks similar but what I am trying to say also is that there are so many more breeds that have similar markings (Brokens produce a huge variance in the size and shape of their markings an example would be the litter you posted the picture of one has a smaller line down the back and the other has almost his whole back covered) that are not ES. ES are not common rabbits to see in pet stores and there are so many other breeds that people will use to create pet store bunnies but an ES is not going to be the first choice in MOST instances.

What Im trying to make clear is that when looking at a broken colored rabbit an ES mix is not the first thing that should be recommended because there is so much more to an ES than just markings. There are many more popular pet breeds that come in the broken variety that would be a better choice for pure guessing.
 

RabbitGirl101

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yes I understand. I was just giving my opinion no harm being done. The pictures of the litter in the one post are the same rabbit. One is when he was younger than the other. I was showing how when he was young he had very similar markings to an ES however, when he was older the line became to thick to be an ES.

This rabbit could very well be an ES we weren't shown a body type on it to really give a good guess, however it could just as well be a broken red New Zealand. So I get what your saying, However I was showing in my pictures that It is very uncommon to get a thin line just covering the spine like it would be for the English Spot. In the litter I posted that rabbit had a thick line running down his spine. When I look at a rabbit for the breed ID contest I first look at color and markings, then the body type, then the fur, head type, size of ears, ect. I was simply making a suggestion as the only thing you could really see in the picture was the coloring and the shape of the markings.
 

bunnychild

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I understand how the rabbit looks similar but what I am trying to say also is that there are so many more breeds that have similar markings (Brokens produce a huge variance in the size and shape of their markings an example would be the litter you posted the picture of one has a smaller line down the back and the other has almost his whole back covered) that are not ES. ES are not common rabbits to see in pet stores and there are so many other breeds that people will use to create pet store bunnies but an ES is not going to be the first choice in MOST instances.

What Im trying to make clear is that when looking at a broken colored rabbit an ES mix is not the first thing that should be recommended because there is so much more to an ES than just markings. There are many more popular pet breeds that come in the broken variety that would be a better choice for pure guessing.
I understand what you are saying. I normally do not jump to the conclusion that a broken rabbit is an ES. I have raised broken varieties before. I just think that this rabbit might have some ES in her.
 

NDrAbBiTs58041

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New pics added on the thread (stink bun)
Someone on there asked what breed She
Was so to help with comments on that thread.

If u want to see her she's on that thread.
Thankx
 

OakRidgeRabbits

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I didn't read every response to this thread, so some of my response may be repeated information. Bear with me!

The rabbit pictured is not an English Spot. Spots have a very clean, precise and specific pattern of spots, as well as a strip of color down the back called a herringbone. The rabbit pictured has a more random display of spots and does not have the herringbone marking. Spots are also a full arch breed. While the rabbit in the pictures is laying down, she still appears to have a much wider, "chunkier" build than a Spot would have. Even more, Spots rarely (if ever) show up in a pet store situation. They are almost exclusively found among breeders and exhibitors only, they are not a common pet breed.

The rabbit pictured appears to be a mixed breed. If I had to pull a wild guess, I would say she may be a Mini Rex or Standard Rex mix, simply because her head/ears give me the Rex vibe. But other than that, she doesn't have any features that stand out to me as one breed or another.

Also, I realize this isn't what you posted about. However, the lone kit pictured in the original photo is concerning to me. It appears to be less than two weeks old and doesn't seem to have its eyes open yet. It should still be confined to a warm, safe nest with its siblings - not scrambling around the cage where the doe could accidentally step on it, the kit could crawl up and over the side of the cage (trust me, it happens), or it could chill from being away from its siblings. The picture may be completely out of context. But based on the information you have provided us with, I would recommend seeking other breeders in your area for future purchases.
 

NDrAbBiTs58041

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I didn't read every response to this thread, so some of my response may be repeated information. Bear with me!

The rabbit pictured is not an English Spot. Spots have a very clean, precise and specific pattern of spots, as well as a strip of color down the back called a herringbone. The rabbit pictured has a more random display of spots and does not have the herringbone marking. Spots are also a full arch breed. While the rabbit in the pictures is laying down, she still appears to have a much wider, "chunkier" build than a Spot would have. Even more, Spots rarely (if ever) show up in a pet store situation. They are almost exclusively found among breeders and exhibitors only, they are not a common pet breed.

The rabbit pictured appears to be a mixed breed. If I had to pull a wild guess, I would say she may be a Mini Rex or Standard Rex mix, simply because her head/ears give me the Rex vibe. But other than that, she doesn't have any features that stand out to me as one breed or another.

Also, I realize this isn't what you posted about. However, the lone kit pictured in the original photo is concerning to me. It appears to be less than two weeks old and doesn't seem to have its eyes open yet. It should still be confined to a warm, safe nest with its siblings - not scrambling around the cage where the doe could accidentally step on it, the kit could crawl up and over the side of the cage (trust me, it happens), or it could chill from being away from its siblings. The picture may be completely out of context. But based on the information you have provided us with, I would recommend seeking other breeders in your area for future purchases.
No, she wasn't a breeder. I have gathered from all the
Responses that she's a mix. That's fine. I was told she
Was a Belgian, well I know now that that's not at all what
She is.

Think the people that I got her from we're just those
Type "oh a bunny, how cute. Lets get it" type and not
Knowing how to really care for them. Don't know, just
A guess and what I have experienced with them.

I don't know anything really about the kits
Other then they went to a different home and
I have the mom. That's all I know about the kits.
 

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