Dwarf Rabbits - need help

Help Support RabbitsOnline:

BunBun71

Well-Known Member
Joined
Feb 15, 2020
Messages
345
Reaction score
247
Location
USA
Hi,

I have some questions about Dwarf rabbits. Thanks for any help!

1. Can they stay outside in winter?
2. Do they need heat in winter?
3. Are they friendly?
4. Are the heat tolerant?
5. What should I feed them?
6. What are the bad things about this breed?
7. Where should I should one from?
8. WARNING - MORE QUESTIONS COMING. :D
 

Hermelin

Well-Known Member
Joined
Dec 9, 2017
Messages
1,634
Reaction score
1,346
Location
Sweden
1. All bunnies can live outside if you have a good set up and think about all the danger. But I would recommend having the bunny live indoors with you instead. I would say english lop don’t fit to live outdoors because their ears can freeze.

Even though I have bunnies outdoors I wished they lived indoors with me instead. If you are going to have an outdoor bunny, you better get two bunnies. So the bunnies won’t be lonely.

2. They won’t need heat during winter but might need it if the temperature go under -20 C.

3. All bunnies are friendly, just depends on how much you spend to socialize them and build a bond.

4. They are just like other bunnies, they handle cold better than heat. If it 25C and up, keep an extra eye on overheating.

5. You feed them 24/7 timothy hay, a bit of pellets and daily leafy greens.

6. Dwarf bunnies aren’t a breed but some of the smaller breeds are harder to socialize, I’ve heard many times they can be aggressive and skittish. That’s what I have heard but never experienced. Myself it’s a true fan of netherland dwarf bunnies. Myself have one and it’s my second bunny of that breed. Just wish he was bigger but he have the same temperament and personality as the first netherland dwarf.

7. Buy from a good breeder that care for the bunnies but best would be adopting one from a rescue.

Hope you like my answers [emoji5]
 

Pumpkin

Well-Known Member
Joined
Feb 6, 2020
Messages
45
Reaction score
30
Location
Pennsylvania, USA
1. Definitely no. A long time ago when I didn't know anything about bunnies, I had my previous bunny out in the cold winter, and his ears literally had ice on them:(:(. The best for them would be for them to be inside, but if they HAD to be outside, make sure it's heated and blocked from the wind.
2. 60-70 degrees Fahrenheit is the best temperature.
3. They are sooo friendly. It will just take some time bonding and spending time with your rabbit.
4. The highest temperature they can tolerate is 80 degrees.
5.
How old is your bunny?
6. I never owned a Dwarf rabbit so I wouldn't know. I'm assuming they have the same pros and cons as any other rabbit.
7. The best would be from a rescue or shelter since a lot of them are abandoned. But some rabbits from rescues will carry some trauma, but put in the effort, and they can be as loving as any other rabbit.
8. Please keep them coming. I'm happy to help:) And if I'm mistaken about any of these, anyone is free to correct me.
 

BunBun71

Well-Known Member
Joined
Feb 15, 2020
Messages
345
Reaction score
247
Location
USA
Thank you! Yes, your answers are very helpful! :)
 

Pumpkin

Well-Known Member
Joined
Feb 6, 2020
Messages
45
Reaction score
30
Location
Pennsylvania, USA
Oh ok! LennontheBunny is a great Youtube Channel and she really helped me with my bunny! Be sure to check her out.
 

Blue eyes

Supporting Member
Joined
Mar 19, 2012
Messages
6,908
Reaction score
3,150
Location
Arizona, USA
I'd actually urge some caution with some of the LennontheBunny videos. I've seen some questionable advice...:(
I think it was last year someone was posting those videos here and several of us noticed some poor advice...can't recall specifics. One thing I do recall is some questionable bunny proofing advice. The advice she gave was clearly specific to just her one rabbit (her only experience as far as I know). It just showed a lack of experience.

@lotrtim , I'm not trying to bash your advice, just urging caution on those videos. I have too often seen people that have one rabbit make the leap that "having a rabbit" is just like what they are experiencing with their one rabbit. An example of this would be when you said "rabbits are soooo friendly." I think it is fantastic that your rabbit is friendly but there are many rabbits that are not. There are many members who have had experiences with not-so-friendly rabbits despite all the bonding time spent with them. Having a super friendly and cuddly rabbit is luck of the draw. I don't know what the chances are statistically but my guess would be no more than 50/50.

I just don't want someone getting a rabbit thinking it is going to be cuddly and friendly and then end up severely disappointed. These are some of the rabbits that then end up in shelters because the new owner had the wrong idea about how incredibly varied rabbits can be.
 
Last edited:

Blue eyes

Supporting Member
Joined
Mar 19, 2012
Messages
6,908
Reaction score
3,150
Location
Arizona, USA
Hi,

I have some questions about Dwarf rabbits. Thanks for any help!

1. Can they stay outside in winter?
2. Do they need heat in winter?
3. Are they friendly?
4. Are the heat tolerant?
5. What should I feed them?
6. What are the bad things about this breed?
7. Where should I should one from?
8. WARNING - MORE QUESTIONS COMING. :D
By housing a rabbit indoors, you'll be able to enjoy them more and build a bond. That's difficult to do with outdoor rabbits.

Their diet depends on their age. If you get a rabbit from a rabbit rescue (highly recommended for many reasons) then you'll likely be feeding an adult diet (for rabbits over 6 months of age). See link below for details.

I believe your last question was where to get one from?

The best place to get a bunny is through a rabbit rescue. (Not a dog/cat shelter, but a group that specializes in rabbits).

Rescued rabbits are all vet-checked, spayed or neutered and sometimes even litter-trained. Those who think it's best to get a baby are mistaken because in a few months they are suddenly surprised when bunny forgets his litter training, turns aggressive and starts misbehaving. Then they discover that the solution is to spay/neuter and they are not at all happy to have to pay the expensive vet costs for the surgery. (In my area a spay costs $250!)

The personality of the fixed rabbit that you see at the rescue is just what you'll get (while baby ones will completely change).

Some other pros for getting rescued rabbits:
Rescued rabbits are vet-checked, so no health issue surprises.
The rescuers know their rabbits and can tell you the distinctiveness of each one.
They have unique mixed-breed rabbits that can be adorable.
You can hold and see and "get to know" the choices at a rabbit rescue and they don't mind you taking your time to find the right one. (All rabbits have distinctly different personalities.) This way you can choose one that likes you too.
And they are very knowledgeable and willing to answer care questions even long after you've brought your new bunny home.

Indoor housing is often required of rabbits being adopted from a rescue. Please know that housing a rabbit indoors does not mean it will smell or that you'll have to change a litter box every day. There are ways to house them indoors without any extreme effort and without odor.:) You can find out more about this here. I believe the rest of that site will provide many answers, including to questions you haven't even thought of!
 

Pumpkin

Well-Known Member
Joined
Feb 6, 2020
Messages
45
Reaction score
30
Location
Pennsylvania, USA
I'd actually urge some caution with some of the LennontheBunny videos. I've seen some questionable advice...:(
I think it was last year someone was posting those videos here and several of us noticed some poor advice...can't recall specifics. One thing I do recall is some questionable bunny proofing advice. The advice she gave was clearly specific to just her one rabbit (her only experience as far as I know). It just showed a lack of experience.

@lotrtim , I'm not trying to bash your advice, just urging caution on those videos. I have too often seen people that have one rabbit make the leap that "having a rabbit" is just like what they are experiencing with their one rabbit. An example of this would be when you said "rabbits are soooo friendly." I think it is fantastic that your rabbit is friendly but there are many rabbits that are not. There are many members who have had experiences with not-so-friendly rabbits despite all the bonding time spent with them. Having a super friendly and cuddly rabbit is luck of the draw. I don't know what the chances are statistically but my guess would be no more than 50/50.

I just don't want someone getting a rabbit thinking it is going to be cuddly and friendly and then end up severely disappointed. These are some of the rabbits that then end up in shelters because the new owner had the wrong idea about how incredibly varied rabbits can be.
@Blue eyes I find that her videos helped me a lot, but I know that might not be the case for everyone. Some of her bunny-proofing ideas weren't the best and not all of them worked, but you just have to see what works for your bunnies. Every bunny is different so some things will work, and some won't. I wouldn't only recommend her. Always get a second opinion from different YouTube channels or from other websites.:)

I've only had a few bunnies and learned different things along the way. Some things don't work for my bunny I have now that worked for my other ones. All my bunnies we're friendly, but I guess that's not the case for everyone. Most of mine I got as babies, so maybe that's why they were so nice. I wouldn't want someone to get a bunny and give it away because it didn't want to be cuddled. Thanks for the feedback!
 

BunBun71

Well-Known Member
Joined
Feb 15, 2020
Messages
345
Reaction score
247
Location
USA
Thank you for the info! :)
I'll answer any Q's later! ;)
- TheBunny7
 

Eve84

Well-Known Member
Joined
Feb 9, 2020
Messages
155
Reaction score
124
Location
Germany
Hi,

I have some questions about Dwarf rabbits. Thanks for any help!

1. Can they stay outside in winter?
2. Do they need heat in winter?
3. Are they friendly?
4. Are the heat tolerant?
5. What should I feed them?
6. What are the bad things about this breed?
7. Where should I should one from?
8. WARNING - MORE QUESTIONS COMING. :D

1: yes if you have a good insulated hutch
2: no
3: yes they are, best to keep them outdoor as that’s their Natural home anyway, never just keep one!!! Rabbit as you can never take in their place as a rabbit- it needs a real friend! And never pick them up! Let them come to you instead!
4: yes to a certain extend, but if you give them plenty of water and fresh salads etc. They will be ok.
6: the ones with the hanging ears (NHD / mini Lop) are the ones you came tame the best.

Eve
 

Eve84

Well-Known Member
Joined
Feb 9, 2020
Messages
155
Reaction score
124
Location
Germany
Also think about when they get territorial they spray Urin in your flat/ house and eat cables, sofas etc
 

Preitler

Loony bunny guy
Supporting Member
Joined
Jul 19, 2015
Messages
1,214
Reaction score
787
Location
Austria
Hi,

I have some questions about Dwarf rabbits. Thanks for any help!

1. Can they stay outside in winter?
2. Do they need heat in winter?
3. Are they friendly?
4. Are the heat tolerant?
5. What should I feed them?
6. What are the bad things about this breed?
7. Where should I should one from?
8. WARNING - MORE QUESTIONS COMING. :D
Ah, well, I'm no expert on dwarfs, my answers are more general.
1. Generally yes, depends somewhat on your local climate. Cold isn't as big a problem as heat can be.
2. No, a well insulated hutch, protected from draft and with hidy houses will do. It helps when they are not alone.
3. Not easy to answer. First, what is your concept of "friendly"? Be aware that those cute bunnies on youtube are not there without a reason, they aren't average. I bet quite a lot of people who got a rabbit because of Lennon were in for a surprise. Rabbits got domesticated rather recently, and the diversity in characters is big. Breeding them without selecting for character can produce skittish assholes rather fast, so getting one from a rescue where you can see what it is is an Idea, otherwise I would look for a dedicated breeder.
4. Define heat. Anyway, it all depends on your setup. People do breed rabbits to be more heat tolerant, but I know only of meat breeders who do that - they're not dwarfs, but they do make great pets too.
5. Depends on your resources. There is more than one way to feed rabbits properly, claims that they need THIS hay or THAT pellets are just one opinion, there are many other ways to feed a rabbit properly.
6. Since dwarfism is more or less a defect that comes with deformations it takes some care that those don't create problems, breeds with deformed skulls tend to more likely get dental problems since alignment of teeth is essential for proper wear. Again, dedicated breeders are aware of that.
7. A rescue would be an option, getting a neutered adult has some advantages. A good breeder is another option.

About indoor rabbits spraying, well, it depends. My intact (breeding) buck did nothing of that while he was alone (and after he was 2yo, before he did spray in his hutch), since I got him his cuddlebun he sprays her now and then, what's on the floor or furniture is just collateral damage, but that's only a few weeks each year when hormones run high, that's not so much to mop up. I can deal with that.
 
Last edited:

BunBun71

Well-Known Member
Joined
Feb 15, 2020
Messages
345
Reaction score
247
Location
USA
Thank you for the info! I appreciate that very much.:)
Have a great night!:D
- TheBunny7
 

majorv

Supporting Member
Joined
Jan 8, 2011
Messages
3,278
Reaction score
591
Location
Texas
To the OP, by “Dwarf” rabbit are you asking specifically about Netherland Dwarf (the breed) or dwarf rabbits in general (and there are a number of breeds considered dwarf in size.
 

Latest posts

Top