Doe running away from babies

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Samgabby

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Evening,

Just me again. So we lost 3 babies around the week mark, to severe injuries caused by mum.
We found putting mum out for the day and putting her back with kits overnight has worked. No more injured. Mum appears happier and babies are just over 2 weeks and running round like mad.
I have noticed past couple of days, they are chasing mum for milk. Especially a certain two. Mum just jumps away and doesn’t let them feed. Is this normal ?
Mum has fed them in front of me previously unfazed, quite a few times. I guess I’m worried she is getting fed up. I also am finding it harder to tell if they are all getting fed overnight. As they are fluffy and hard to see if tummies are round. Even when feeling.
Just after any advice, as this has been the most helpful, and non judgemental site I have found.
Do I just trust mum is doing her thing and they are fine. They also now escape out of the nest and go into a wooden box with hay in as there preferred location ? Do I leave the kits to it if that’s what they want or continue to put them back in the original nest ? As they keep escaping.
Ps have a cute pic of my 6 bundles of joy
 

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Preitler

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It is completly normal that the doe gets fed up. Normally, she would feed twice a day, and that's it. Kits constantly buging her can be quite some stress. A high shelf or so to get away fom the kits can help. Or sectioning part of the enclosure off with a wooden board high enough so that the kits can't get over it (but put a ramp, or lots of hay on the other side so they can more easily go back when one manages to get over it)

I would arrange things so that the nest is easy to reach, like removing one side of the nestbox or putting it on it's side so that they can get in and out without any barrier. And maybe arrange things so that the other spot is less attractive. But I guess at feeding time they'll come running to the doe anyway.

In nature the nest is at the end of a tunnel, so when they venture out it's very easy to get back in.
 

Samgabby

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It is completly normal that the doe gets fed up. Normally, she would feed twice a day, and that's it. Kits constantly buging her can be quite some stress. A high shelf or so to get away fom the kits can help. Or sectioning part of the enclosure off with a wooden board high enough so that the kits can't get over it (but put a ramp, or lots of hay on the other side so they can more easily go back when one manages to get over it)

I would arrange things so that the nest is easy to reach, like removing one side of the nestbox or putting it on it's side so that they can get in and out without any barrier. And maybe arrange things so that the other spot is less attractive. But I guess at feeding time they'll come running to the doe anyway.

In nature the nest is at the end of a tunnel, so when they venture out it's very easy to get back in.
So I put a wooden box in the pen for mum, so she could get up and away from them, as I could see they were annoying her. She also gets outside time completely away from them. Which she likes. But now they appeared to have re-nested inside the hut. But haven’t gone in there original nest at all over the past two days, even though it is completely accessible, via a ramp. Mum and kits can get easily in and out of the hut. Just wondered if I should just leave them to it. They obviously prefer the new box.
 

JBun

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There's really no reason they need to stay in the original nest. As long as they are safe and won't get too hot or too cold in their new location, and mom can access and nurse them when needed, it should be fine.
 

Samgabby

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There's really no reason they need to stay in the original nest. As long as they are safe and won't get too hot or too cold in their new location, and mom can access and nurse them when needed, it should be fine.
Thank you so much. They are just not interested in there old nest, they love the house. Mum can get in and out. Plenty of hay inside. I will just leave them then. Thank you x
 

TreasuredFriend

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Will add that the two mothers in our care did get annoyed and stressed by their youngsters chasing her (them) for nursing. Moms' annoyance was evident and babes and mom got separated a tad earlier.

Abandoned street mother Cuddles did leap up to the shelf we put into her housing unit (what Preitler suggested above).

We could hear the raucous as one Mom and juveys were kept in our bedroom.

Major relief in Moms' demeanor and body language after suckling-adamant children gave momma less stress.
 

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Samgabby

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Will add that the two mothers in our care did get annoyed and stressed by their youngsters chasing her (them) for nursing. Moms' annoyance was evident and babes and mom got separated a tad earlier.

Abandoned street mother Cuddles did leap up to the shelf we put into her housing unit (what Preitler suggested above).

We could hear the raucous as one Mom and juveys were kept in our bedroom.

Major relief in Moms' demeanor and body language after suckling-adamant children gave momma less stress.
That’s all helpful, thank you. How did you figure out what there weight should be ? I have one a bit lighter than the others. I gave it a little top up of milk via a syringe and it took it.
 

TreasuredFriend

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We had a scale for weighing orphaned cottontails and youngsters. Same type of scale could be used to weigh domestic youngsters and find info (perhaps from House Rabbit Society articles?) wrt caring for infants and juveniles if the mom is no longer able to nurse. / Or mom isn't living to provide colostrum and nutrients to her babes.

Meeting individuals who truly want the babes to survive, @Samgabby, is rewarding. Sounds like the kits are almost 4 weeks of age. Due to Cuddles' stress we separated the 7 babes from her at approx. 6 weeks. I think my blog says March 25, 2006, when babes and Cuddles got their own housing units. Hope the info helps and you continue to be a guardian angel to precious heartbeats.

 
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TreasuredFriend

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Scale Salter Electronic Aquatronic. We got a similar type ages ago when I rehabbed cottontails and needed to weigh the orphaned kits. Similar scales are likely available in kg/lb and ml/fl oz. measurements. I have to jump over to Sweet Binks Rescue site on Facebook and see if the rehabber mentions caring for orphaned domestics (from abandoned/unspayed females) and weighing the youngsters.

 

Samgabby

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Scale Salter Electronic Aquatronic. We got a similar type ages ago when I rehabbed cottontails and needed to weigh the orphaned kits. Similar scales are likely available in kg/lb and ml/fl oz. measurements. I have to jump over to Sweet Binks Rescue site on Facebook and see if the rehabber mentions caring for orphaned domestics (from abandoned/unspayed females) and weighing the youngsters.

Thanks so much !
 

TreasuredFriend

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The dutch rabbits who came to us from the shelter (who didn't have space to house them, and would euthanize all 5) were separated from Mother Dutch at 5-6 weeks or so. They really wanted to chase down their Mom for suckles - and she was super stressed.
 

Samgabby

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We had a scale for weighing orphaned cottontails and youngsters. Same type of scale could be used to weigh domestic youngsters and find info (perhaps from House Rabbit Society articles?) wrt caring for infants and juveniles if the mom is no longer able to nurse. / Or mom isn't living to provide colostrum and nutrients to her babes.

Meeting individuals who truly want the babes to survive, @Samgabby, is rewarding. Sounds like the kits are almost 4 weeks of age. Due to Cuddles' stress we separated the 7 babes from her at approx. 5 and a half to 6 weeks. I think my blog says March 18, 2006, when babes and Cuddles got their own housing units. Hope the info helps and you continue to be a guardian angel to precious heartbeats.

I love these babies more than anything. I have spent hours researching how to give them the best start in life. Just trying to do everything right. The best part of my day is seeing them! Officially an obsessed mum. I appreciate the advice.
 

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