Do I have to neuter my bun?

Discussion in 'Health & Wellness' started by AmandaCat, Jan 24, 2019.

Help Support Rabbits Online by donating:

  1. Jan 24, 2019 #1

    AmandaCat

    AmandaCat

    AmandaCat

    Member

    Joined:
    May 20, 2018
    Messages:
    8
    Likes Received:
    1
    I have read many online pages about why to neuter rabbits, and I fully planned on getting Louie fixed. However, I’ve read so many horror stories about bunnies that reacted to the anesthesia that I’m scared to take him in.

    He’s nine months old now, and he’s never once bit me, growled, lunged, or anything remotely aggressive. He doesn’t really spray, and he seems pretty happy. He’s just a lovely little guy.

    Will I see these behaviors come out still, even though he’s past the age you usually see them? How much of a risk is there really with neutering?
     
  2. Jan 24, 2019 #2

    Popsicles

    Popsicles

    Popsicles

    Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Apr 12, 2018
    Messages:
    1,001
    Likes Received:
    377
    Location:
    England
    If he doesn’t have too many adverse behaviours, and you don’t intend to mix him with any other buns, there isn’t too much of a need to get him neutered. The risk of problems with anaesthetic is very low (less than 1%) but if you don’t need to do it then in your case I might be inclined to leave it. I had an entire male rabbit for 10 years and he was an angel.
     
    JBun and Blue eyes like this.
  3. Jan 24, 2019 #3

    Anna R.

    Anna R.

    Anna R.

    Supporting Member

    Joined:
    Dec 11, 2018
    Messages:
    19
    Likes Received:
    14
    Location:
    Snohomish, WA
    On the same note, I am wondering what others think of spaying female rabbits. I have read that it is essential for them to be spayed to avoid ovarian cancer. I have had 3 females that haven't been spayed. One lived to be 12, the other is 7; but, one died way too early at age 6. I am not certain what she died from; however, ever since her death a few months ago i am so scared of losing my other rabbits too early. I have 2 females that are 6 and 10 months old and am wondering whether to spay them or not. I am so scared of something going wrong during the surgery, or having her not recover fully. I just want to know if it is really necessary or what others think about this. I don't plan on ever breeding them, so that is not a concern of mine. I only have female rabbits, so there is no chance of them ever becoming pregnant. My girls are both small Polish rabbits and the thought of them going under the knife (or laser) horrifies me. They are both so little and cute. They are not aggressive, and show no signs of the usual hormonal issues, they are such good little girls. They are both the sweetest bunnies I have ever had. Are the benefits of spaying really worth it? Does it matter that much if they aren't spayed? I don't want to lose my babies too soon again, and if spaying is really a guarantee of a longer life then i will.

    Please let me know what others think about this. I am so torn about what to do.
     
  4. Jan 24, 2019 #4

    somebunnylovesme

    somebunnylovesme

    somebunnylovesme

    Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Jan 3, 2019
    Messages:
    73
    Likes Received:
    20
    Location:
    canada
    I had a doe that was sweet and cuddly at until she reached 2 1/2 -2 months old. Then she started to chase and attack me. Does can be a little harder to manage when they get older. Spaying helps with hormones and pregnancies. If I were to get a doe, I would definitely spay her. I wouldn't want to take the chance of what I had experienced.

    The vet will check the bunnies before hand to see if they can be to see if their is any medical reason why the cannot be spayed. I had a bunny that had to get his molars filed down and the had to put him under anesthesia. He was fine.

    The breeder that I got my bunny from, her does lived for a long time. With my bunnies there they were fixed and died from natural causes at young age, such as, cancer.
     
  5. Jan 30, 2019 #5

    JBun

    JBun

    JBun

    Jenny - Health & Wellness Mod Staff Member Administrator Moderator

    Joined:
    Sep 10, 2012
    Messages:
    7,220
    Likes Received:
    1,647
    Location:
    Utah, , USA
    There is some indication that as certain does get older they become very susceptible to developing uterine cancer. According to an old research article, certain breeds of a certain age, were highly likely to develop uterine cancer, and some breeds a higher incidence than others. I did find a citing that mentioned it being rare in polish rabbits though. The first link summarizes the research that was done, but there is a photo of a uterus affected by cancer included if you don't like to see that sort of thing. You can read an abstract of the research article but I couldn't find the full article to read(free of charge). It's the last link.
    https://idosi.org/gv/GV9(2)12/24.pdf (WARNING: MEDICAL RELATED PHOTO IN LINK)
    http://wildpro.twycrosszoo.org/S/00dis/Miscellaneous/UterineAdenocarcinomaRabbit.htm (MEDICAL PHOTOS)
    http://wabbitwiki.com/wiki/Uterine_cancer
    https://nyaspubs.onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/abs/10.1111/j.1749-6632.1959.tb44573.x

    Surgery, as safe as it can be, is still a risk and anything can happen. So you have to weigh the risk of possible uterine cancer with the risk of anesthesia and surgery. If you do opt for spaying them, I would suggest finding the absolutely best rabbit vet you can, do blood work beforehand to ensure good liver and kidney function, as that can help minimize any possible risks. Also checking to see if your vet does intubation and IV for the surgery, as these can also help minimize risks. Though all of this will also add onto the costs.
    https://rabbit.org/vet-listings/
    http://wabbitwiki.com/wiki/Spaying_and_neutering_rabbits
    http://www.bio.miami.edu/hare/opcare.html
     
    Imbrium likes this.
  6. Jan 31, 2019 #6

    somebunnylovesme

    somebunnylovesme

    somebunnylovesme

    Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Jan 3, 2019
    Messages:
    73
    Likes Received:
    20
    Location:
    canada
    Honestly Amanda Cat, if you male is not being aggressive I doubt he'll be later. He might spray neutering may help with that.

    If you want to neuter him in case later your thinking another bunny or mingling with other bunnies then I would. I've had male bunnies and they are a lot calmer and more affectionate and were not neutered.
     
  7. Feb 4, 2019 #7

    Anna R.

    Anna R.

    Anna R.

    Supporting Member

    Joined:
    Dec 11, 2018
    Messages:
    19
    Likes Received:
    14
    Location:
    Snohomish, WA
    thanks everyone. I have decided against the spaying. I have never spayed before, and i don't think i will start now. Thanks JBun for your links to the uterine cancer sites. I think the cons out weigh the pros for me. I only have female rabbits so there is no concern of pregnancy. She is the sweetest little rabbit i have ever had, and i don't want to take a chance on losing her. She is not aggressive at ALL. Just sweet and cuddly. I can't take her to a vet and leave her there by herself and make her go through that alone without me being there to hold her paw. She would be so scared, and i don't want to hurt her. I think she is just fine intact as she is. And, that is the way she is going to stay. I thank everyone for your comments and helping me decide. Jasmine is happy too and thanks you that she doesn't have to go through that.
     
  8. Feb 7, 2019 #8

    chelseajuliam

    chelseajuliam

    chelseajuliam

    Member

    Joined:
    Feb 7, 2019
    Messages:
    16
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    canada
    my baby bunny died 2 days ago while being spayed,i should not have done it!!! there was no reason for it
     
  9. Feb 7, 2019 #9

    Anna R.

    Anna R.

    Anna R.

    Supporting Member

    Joined:
    Dec 11, 2018
    Messages:
    19
    Likes Received:
    14
    Location:
    Snohomish, WA
    Oh my goodness, I am so very sorry to hear that. My heart breaks for you. That is horrible. All my sympathy goes out to you.
     
    chelseajuliam likes this.
  10. Feb 7, 2019 #10

    chelseajuliam

    chelseajuliam

    chelseajuliam

    Member

    Joined:
    Feb 7, 2019
    Messages:
    16
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    canada
    thank you so much
     
  11. Feb 8, 2019 #11

    Morgan_McComsey

    Morgan_McComsey

    Morgan_McComsey

    Member

    Joined:
    Jan 11, 2019
    Messages:
    5
    Likes Received:
    3
    Location:
    Lancaster, PA
    I’ll chime in and share that my Nahko was neutered at 5months and he recovered quickly. He’s still the loveable munchkin he always was. I know neutering is far less invasive than a spay. Just do your research on exotic vets in your area. I take him to a rabbit savvy vet that luckily lives 5 mins from me. It’s better to get your loved one spayed or neutered when they’re younger. <3
     
  12. Feb 11, 2019 #12

    chelseajuliam

    chelseajuliam

    chelseajuliam

    Member

    Joined:
    Feb 7, 2019
    Messages:
    16
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    canada
    thank you,having a very hard time with this
     
  13. Feb 11, 2019 #13

    chelseajuliam

    chelseajuliam

    chelseajuliam

    Member

    Joined:
    Feb 7, 2019
    Messages:
    16
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    canada
    thank you so sad
     
  14. Feb 12, 2019 #14

    Anna R.

    Anna R.

    Anna R.

    Supporting Member

    Joined:
    Dec 11, 2018
    Messages:
    19
    Likes Received:
    14
    Location:
    Snohomish, WA
    I completely understand. It is so hard losing a bunny. It feels like someone has ripped your heart out. Hang in there, it does get better. I know it doesn't feel like it; but, it does. I'm so sorry again for your loss.
     
    chelseajuliam likes this.
  15. Feb 14, 2019 #15

    chelseajuliam

    chelseajuliam

    chelseajuliam

    Member

    Joined:
    Feb 7, 2019
    Messages:
    16
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    canada
    thank you!!!! she was really loved and gave so much love! miss her kisses
     
  16. Feb 15, 2019 #16

    ChloeBunny

    ChloeBunny

    ChloeBunny

    Member

    Joined:
    Nov 26, 2018
    Messages:
    6
    Likes Received:
    2
    Location:
    USA
    I, too, was torn when I rescued a female mini-lop who also had a respiratory infection at age 2 yrs. I also had a concern about the cancer and did a lot of research to determine actual cases of cancer for older female rabbits. I didn't want my fear to drive the decision but facts. There are always risks with anesthesia and bunnies - which caused more anxiety about spaying. However, I went through with it after researching at length the best rabbit vet that another veterinary office also recommended. I think the skill of the vet, their previous experience, and good word-of-mouth reputation is key. My bun, Chloe, did really well, is super loving. I'd do it again, knowing I've got the right vet but also understanding that there is still risk with anesthesia even under the most skillful surgical hands. I hope this helps.
     
    Anna R. likes this.
  17. Feb 16, 2019 at 11:43 PM #17

    RWAF

    RWAF

    RWAF

    Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Jan 5, 2011
    Messages:
    348
    Likes Received:
    25
    Location:
    , , United Kingdom
    I spoke to my own vet today when I took my (neutered male) in for treatment and she was telling me about a case this week where an unspayed female died under anaesthetic. There was no outward sign of problems other than the condition she had been admitted for, but with the owner's permission the vet investigated and the rabbit was very badly affected by cancers that had arisen in her uterus.

    We know from studies that by the age of 4, around 80% of unspayed females have uterine cancer. By that time, those that got it early in life will already have had spread to other major organs and some of those will have died from the disease. My vet told me she has seen it in 6 month old females, although at that age it is generally still confined to the uterus. So if your girl hasn't yet been spayed, for her own welfare, please do have this done by a rabbit friendly vet.
     

Share This Page