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Dander on Angora

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Sable

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I have an angora that I comb for his wool to spin into wool. Lately I have noticed dander along his spine. It can't be combed out. I would like to know how to get rid of it. His diet consists of 2/3 cup 18% protein pellets per day, alfalfa/grass hay and fresh water daily. I also give him a half slice of bread every day and the occasional piece of carrot or apple. He is in a large wire cage in the house. Is there something I can give him to get rid of this dander? He isn't scratching so I don't think he is hurting from this condition.

Thanks in advance for any help you can give me.
Sable
 

Carolyn

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Hi Sable,

I wonder if your little one has mites. Another poster on a rabbit forum wrote the wrote the following and I'm wondering if it's the same type of thing you're experiencing.

This was the 3rd vet of a practice to see Willow,and the first 2 never did see the mites under a scope. All they could see was white dry skin and debris that came of with her fur.

The following is a from:http://www.psg.lcs.mit.edu/~carl/paige/care/medical.html

A mite that lives on the skin dander of rabbits will cause your rabbit to scratch and if left untreated will eventually develop thick crusts on their bodies. An injectable drug called ivermectin can be given twice, 2 weeks apart, to eliminate this problem. Rabbits can die if the ivermectin dosage is not correct, so for you home treatment people, please see your veterinarian for this one.



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This was what Pam Nock had suggested to another poster about mites in a different forum. You may want to ask her what her thoughts are for diagnosis before treating the animal.

* * * * * * * *

Most rabbits have fur mites to some degree and never show symptoms. I suspect that in the case of your rabbit, there is some underlying cause allowing the severe infestation. A weak immune system,very young or very old rabbits are most often at risk. Because your rabbit is only 2, I suspect an underlying health cause. I have found that a diet supplement such as Nutri-Cal can help boost immunity and improve health. You may want to address this issue with your vet. I've seen some terrible mite eaten coats improve with Ivomec in combination with a change in diet and an improvement in overall health.

Pam

 

pamnock

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Sable,

Angoras are very prone to fur mites, which often make the coat appear as though the rabbit has "dandruff". Ivermectin is the most commonly used miticide used in rabbits. You can consult with your vet for proper medicating. 1/10 of a cc of injectable ivermectin per5 lbs. is often used (this can also be given orally, but is most effective injected). Ivermectin horse wormer paste (oral)is sometimes used (approx. pea-sized smear on the tongue). My friend (an Angora breeder) gives Ivermectin paste 1x per week to her Angoras in coat --less often to those that are sheared.

Kitten flea powder or sevin dust can also be used, but inrare cases have caused a neurological reaction in (cats and rabbits)when absorbed through the skin near the spinal cord (I usedSevin dustfor many years without incident).

Disclaimer: I recommend consulting with the vet before administering any medication.

Pamela Nock ~ ARBA Registrar

http://www.geocities.com/pamnock/
 

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