Commuting with/transporting baby bunny

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koalasoom

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Hi all!
Hope everyone is doing well. We’re due to go and collect our baby this Saturday however our pet carrier has not arrived yet and isn’t due to arrive till after next week. The lady selling has told us that she will provide him in a cardboard box and insists that this is okay.

It’s around a 5hr drive and i really don’t want him to get distressed on a drive in a cardboard box the whole time. The only thing I can think of is the litter box which is large in size and would provide him with air and space, however this has a flap so I’m not sure that’s safe for transport purposes either.

Am i being dramatic? Is there any other way?

Thank you!
 

Apollo’s Slave

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Could you get a carrier from pets at home? I’ve heard of cardboard boxes being used for short distances but never a 5 hour trip. Rabbits can easily chew through cardboard which can quickly turn into a problem if the rabbit manages to get out.
 

zuppa

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Cardboard box is fine as long as it is strong enough, has top, has perforation on top and sides for aeration, is big enough so your rabbit has enough of air. You can bring your own cardboard box and prepare it at home, I would suggest size same as your litterbox so you put litterbox in there and fill it as usual litterbox with wood pellets and hay so he will be able to lay in there and eat his hay.

Water would be most difficult as you don't want to give him a bottle as it will drip all the way as car moves and really no good, especially with cardboard, it's a no. You can give him some watery green leaves instead (if he already introduced to them, ask the lady), carrot etc, you can offer him water every couple hours when stopping. Also have freezer blocks or 1,5-2 ltr frozen water bottles (keep in a freezer overnight and take with you in an insulated bag if you have one), keep them next to the box (but make sure not touching cardboard as it gets wet quickly). Or if your car has air cooler you won't need it.

Make sure there's enough holes in the box. If you got some grids or you can take a shelf from your fridge to cover top of the box, fix it firmly to make sure he has enough air circulation. Or make one side of the grid panel, Idk be creative, you just want him to have enough (but not too much room) and protect him from heat. 5 hours is a long drive but car will be moving and if he has his toilet with hay and maybe a piece of carrot and you will stop every 2-3 hours to give him some water or if he can eat celery or fresh greens mint coriander romaine lettuce, he will be fine as he gets water from them. Have some fresh in your icebag to give him every couple hours something watery.

Make sure cardboard box is strong enough. I don't think he will be chewing it as when car moves it's a bit of stress and anyway a couple hours he won't even think about it, if box is strong enough he will have no time to make hole big enough to escape. Give him some chewing toys as well, stuffed paper towel roll should work.

I had max 2,5 hours traveling with my rabbits, they usually relaxed in their box and not moving a lot, mostly falling asleep after a while.

I used plastic travel box like cat carrier or cardboard box, both were fine.
 
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zuppa

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Wait, how big is your rabbit, is it a baby like 8-10 weeks?
If he's not big you can use washing up sink bowl as a plastic base for your cardboard box, fill it with wood pellets and hay, and find a box same size that would be enough for the baby.
 

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I would agree that you don't want too large of a box. They feel safer in a smaller area and it prevents too much jostling about. Cardboard is slippery, though, so I'd still suggest a thick folded towel in the bottom. Even a plastic tray with litter on top could be slippery. I'd use a towel in the bottom of whatever you use (even if you put litter on top of the towel) to prevent slipping about.

You mentioned that you were considering a litterbox you have with a flap. That sound like one of those enclosed cat litter boxes?? If so, I'd discourage use of that at home as a bunny litter box. Rabbit urine emits lots of ammonia which can get trapped in a closed litter box. Over time that can harm bunny's respiratory system. An open box is best for a rabbit litter box. If he ends being one to kick his litter out, you can get a higher sided box with a cutout for entry. I'd just recommend avoiding anything with a lid -- and most especially with a lid and a flap.
 

koalasoom

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Thank you all for the advice. I really appreciate it.

Unfortunately, today, just 2 days before I was due to collect baby, the seller has randomly messaged saying that she has decided to keep him. She'd been quite difficult to get a response out of so her message was very unexpected and has just got me really upset.

All is on hold now :(
 

Apollo’s Slave

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Thank you all for the advice. I really appreciate it.

Unfortunately, today, just 2 days before I was due to collect baby, the seller has randomly messaged saying that she has decided to keep him. She'd been quite difficult to get a response out of so her message was very unexpected and has just got me really upset.

All is on hold now :(
Oh wow. I’m sorry. There are many other breeders though, what breed were you looking for?
 

koalasoom

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Oh wow. I’m sorry. There are many other breeders though, what breed were you looking for?
I was actually after a mini lop, lilac in colour. He was beautiful. He was light grey with some areas of white. I mean they're all beautiful but my heart was so set on him.
 

koalasoom

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It could be a blessing in disguise. Now you can look at some rescue rabbits rather than a baby. Getting an already-fixed rabbit is better anyway for a first-time bunny owner. ;)

I agree. I have enquired at rescues nearby to me. Most of the mini lops are reserved/bonded. We enquired re Pudsey and were told that they'd rather he go to a home with another bunny for company but we're waiting to hear. They didn't rule us out completely but I don't know how likely it is.
 

koalasoom

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Nancy McClelland

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We've rescued 47 over the last 2 decades. Everything from a 1 pound 2ounce Netherland to a Checkered Giant that was young and grew to be 20 pounds (almost 10 kilos) in six months. They have all been a joy to have--we even took in problematic rabbits that were to be euthanized because of behavioral issues. Time and patience and you can find one to your liking--usually a rescue from a shelter saves on neutering which can be expensive in some areas. Good luck.
 

Diane R

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Thank you all for the advice. I really appreciate it.

Unfortunately, today, just 2 days before I was due to collect baby, the seller has randomly messaged saying that she has decided to keep him. She'd been quite difficult to get a response out of so her message was very unexpected and has just got me really upset.

All is on hold now :(
Sorry about that but this is your opportunity to adopt from a rescue centre. I strongly recommend a neutered, bonded pair. Babies are much harder and then you have the hassle and upset of neutering and bonding. Rescue bunnies are already vaccinated too. Adopt, don't shop. Have a look at these gorgeous girls and the many other bunnies on that site waiting for good homes: TULIP & DAISY, Medium Rabbit, Available for Adoption in Essex - Rabbit Rehome
 
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koalasoom

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Sorry about that but this is your opportunity to adopt from a rescue centre. I strongly recommend a neutered, bonded pair. Babies are much harder and then you have the hassle and upset of neutering and bonding. Rescue bunnies are already vaccinated too. Adopt, don't shop. Have a look at these gorgeous girls and the many other bunnies on that site waiting for good homes: TULIP & DAISY, Medium Rabbit, Available for Adoption in Essex - Rabbit Rehome
Thank you for the info. Like I said, I am also considering rescues however cannot home two bunnies at the moment.

I’ll keep looking and see what i find!
 

Diane R

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Thank you for the info. Like I said, I am also considering rescues however cannot home two bunnies at the moment.

I’ll keep looking and see what i find!
Two bunnies do not need more space than 1 bunny. A single bunny also needs 60 square foot 24/7.
 

koalasoom

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Two bunnies do not need more space than 1 bunny. A single bunny also needs 60 square foot 24/7.
it’s not just about the space. It’s the financial implications of keeping two bunnies instead of 1 that i would also need to consider.
 

Diane R

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it’s not just about the space. It’s the financial implications of keeping two bunnies instead of 1 that i would also need to consider.
Ah, OK, that makes sense (vet bills, insurance) but perhaps you should wait until you can afford to look after two then.
 

Apollo’s Slave

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it’s not just about the space. It’s the financial implications of keeping two bunnies instead of 1 that i would also need to consider.
I agree. I’m saving up a bit of money to get a second rabbit also. RSPCA usually doesn’t adopt rabbits that aren’t bonded or go to homes as a single bun, but on occasion they will. That is how I got Apollo, he’s supposedly ‘unbondable’, or at least he didn’t bond with the bunny that they tried him with. You could always look for those sort of rabbits.
 

koalasoom

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Ah, OK, that makes sense (vet bills, insurance) but perhaps you should wait until you can afford to look after two then.
i’ve done plenty of research and have been told by many that house rabbits can live happily on their own as long as they’re given plenty of love and attention.
 

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