Cloth bedding vs. disposible bedding

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Marandabee

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I have tried all kinds of bedding for my 2 lionhead bunnies, regular hay, timothy hay, timothy and alfalfa hay, and paper bedding. I also bought a bag of Aspen bedding which I have not used yet. They kick everything out the sides of the cage. They are housing in a huge plastic cage on wheels that has a ramp and platform for food or play. Should I try cloth bedding?
 

Blue eyes

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Don't use bedding at all. It isn't necessary. Just use a litter box (they train easily enough). The only thing to watch for is if the cage floor is totally plastic. That means it can be too slippery and cause traction issues since they only have fur (not pads) on their paws. Putting a non-slip surface down would be advised.

Take a look here (scroll down at the link) for ways to make the plastic cages usable:

and here for litter training:
 

JBun

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It sounds like you need to change your set up altogether. Rabbits can be litter box trained, which means you don't need bedding other than the litter in the litter box. Wood pellet litter is the best at odor control and absorption. It also doesn't easily get tracked out of the litter box or stick to their fur. If your rabbits are diggers and that's how it's getting kicked out, then putting a screen over the litter to prevent digging, would be something to consider.


If your rabbits are kept in a cage, I would also suggest you consider changing their set up to provide a larger area. It will provide them with a happier more enriching life.


Also I don't know if you have two babies or fixed adult rabbits, but in case you aren't aware and they are babies, at 10-12 weeks old they will need to be separated before they sexually mature and fighting or mating can occur. Then if you want to be able to put them back together, they both need to be fixed, wait 4-8 weeks for hormones to fade, then go through the proper bonding process. But just know, not all rabbits that get along as babies, will get along as adults. So there is a chance that they won't have compatible personalities and will not bond with each other.


 

Marandabee

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It sounds like you need to change your set up altogether. Rabbits can be litter box trained, which means you don't need bedding other than the litter in the litter box. Wood pellet litter is the best at odor control and absorption. It also doesn't easily get tracked out of the litter box or stick to their fur. If your rabbits are diggers and that's how it's getting kicked out, then putting a screen over the litter to prevent digging, would be something to consider.


If your rabbits are kept in a cage, I would also suggest you consider changing their set up to provide a larger area. It will provide them with a happier more enriching life.


Also I don't know if you have two babies or fixed adult rabbits, but in case you aren't aware and they are babies, at 10-12 weeks old they will need to be separated before they sexually mature and fighting or mating can occur. Then if you want to be able to put them back together, they both need to be fixed, wait 4-8 weeks for hormones to fade, then go through the proper bonding process. But just know, not all rabbits that get along as babies, will get along as adults. So there is a chance that they won't have compatible personalities and will not bond with each other.



I am going to try litter box training with them, right now that are about 12 weeks old. I have another cage so I can separate them. They were literally handled by humans since the moment they were born, they are very domesticated. I haven't been able to determine their sex because they are so furry I can't see the area clearly. One is much larger than the other, although that may mean nothing. I have a great veterinarian who I'm sure can determine their sex. Thank you for the advice, I am going to go with litter box training and then cloth bedding.
 

JBun

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It definitely can be hard to sex them with all that fluff in the way. Here's a link for sexing rabbits if you are comfortable handling them so they won't get injured in the process. Otherwise yes, it would be better to have a vet do it.


If your vet is just a cat and dog vet not experienced with rabbits, it would be advisable to go to a knowledgeable rabbit vet instead. Rabbits have different handling and medical requirements, and some things that work for cats and dogs can be dangerous for rabbits. Just something to consider.

 

Marandabee

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Thank you, I will see if I can get a better idea of what they are. They are 12 weeks old and the last thing I want is a litter of bunnies. I love them but 2 is enough.
 

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