Cecotrope Smearing

Discussion in 'Nutrition and Behavior' started by lavendertealatte, Apr 11, 2019.

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  1. Apr 11, 2019 #1

    lavendertealatte

    lavendertealatte

    lavendertealatte

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    I'm basically having this problem..
    https://www.rabbitsonline.net/threads/cecotrope-smearing-everywhere.62675/

    Been this way for maybe a year now... probably started when we started introducing veggies. Initially I thought maybe it was pee but I am 99% sure it's cecotrope smearing. We already switched over to Oxbow timothy pellets about a month or so ago, I give him about 1/4 cup a day. I tried to decrease it, but I am worried about decreasing too much because the vet said he could stand to gain some weight last time she saw him, and I also stopped all veggies probably a few months ago as well in hopes it would help with the smearing problem.

    He's about a year old. The only things he gets are oat hay (which he loves.. mostly the oat seed thingys I think), orchard grass hay, and pellets.

    Unfortunately because I've already cut out all fruits/veggies for months now I can't figure out how to fix this problem.. will he get enough nutrients if he only feeds on hay?
     
  2. Apr 11, 2019 #2

    Hermelin

    Hermelin

    Hermelin

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    He will get all the nutrients from hay, as long it’s a good quality. Hay it’s the main component of their food, the important thing it’s to find out what are causing him to have cecotropes smearing and solve it.

    When you find the trouble you can introduce veggies and pellets slowly to his diet again.

    When my rabbit have stomach problem I take away all the other things and just let them have a strict hay diet. When they have a normal stomach, I’ll reintroduce the diet they should have slowly.
     
  3. Apr 17, 2019 #3

    lavendertealatte

    lavendertealatte

    lavendertealatte

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    Thanks Hermelin. We're down to just the oat hay and grass hay... still smearing.... really hoping this works. Really want to free roam him but can't with the smearing problem as it's just far too messy
     
  4. Apr 17, 2019 #4

    JBun

    JBun

    JBun

    Jenny - Health & Wellness Mod Staff Member Administrator Moderator

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    It's possible the oat hay is contributing to the problem, particularly if it is a really soft early growth(too rich) or if it has a lot of seed heads in it(too many carbs). So you may want to try removing that and only feed a less carb rich grass hay like orchard or timothy.

    If that doesn't work, then it might be safe to say it's not the diet and there could be a health reason behind it. If you haven't ever had a fecal test done, that might be something worth having your vet do to rule out parasites. Might even be worth doing a round of the dewormer fenbendazole just in case(I prefer at least 5 days at 20mg/kg). There's also the possibility it could be a malabsorption problem. Megacolon is one type, but usually with megacolon the rabbit regularly has oval and irregularly shaped fecal poop, or unformed cow pile type poop.
     
  5. May 17, 2019 at 7:13 PM #5

    lavendertealatte

    lavendertealatte

    lavendertealatte

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    yes it is coarse but it has tons of seed heads and he LOVES them........... I am trying to decrease but the cute begging face oh my goodness. -_-

    Thank you for the advice.. perhaps I'll do a dewormer even if he doesn't have worms? Is it safe to do that?

    Can I rule out a malabsorption problem if most of his poops are normal and round? It's just the smears that I'm having issues with.
     
  6. May 17, 2019 at 8:29 PM #6

    JBun

    JBun

    JBun

    Jenny - Health & Wellness Mod Staff Member Administrator Moderator

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    That could be it then. The seed heads are going to contain a lot of carbs, and that can cause mushy poop to develop for some rabbits. It did for one of mine I tried feeding rolled oats to for weight gain, so I stopped giving them. So the option for you would be to find a different hay, or to hand pick as many seed heads out as possible, which is a pain I know. RESIST!... that cute begging face:p I know it's hard.

    Yes, if his fecal poop is normal then it's likely the dietary or parasite issue is the cause.

    If you give the right dewormer and the right dose, it is usually fine. Though if a rabbit had a heavy worm load, it's possible the die off could cause serious problems. If you suspect a heavy worm load, I would consult my vet first, and possibly give a half dose the first day, then a full dose the next. I prefer fenbendazole(panacur) for general deworming, 20mg/kg, once a day for 5 days, 10 days off, then one additional dose, keeping a close eye to make sure eating/drinking remains normal.
    http://www.medirabbit.com/EN/GI_diseases/Parasitic_diseases/Pass/Pass_en.htm
    http://wildpro.twycrosszoo.org/S/00dis/Parasitic/Pinworms_inf_lagomorphs.htm
     

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