Can't Find Out My Newborn Litter's Mother

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ISAC QUIN HOOER

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Hello!

Recently our 3 Female rabbits had gotten out and we caught them the next day. one of my escaped rabbits is white, the other gray, and one of them is black. When we caught them we had kept them in a large hutch. One of them must have gotten in touch with a male when one of them were out, and now we have 6 newborn baby bunnies. all 6 of them are a grayish/white color. We do NOT know which one is there mother. Is there any way to find out? Any help is welcome! 😀
 

zuppa

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One of the girls should have milk? Was there a nest with fur etc? You can check if any of your girls is missing some fur I guess. Also she should drink a lot more and eat a lot as she needs to produce milk for the babies.
How old are the babies, any pics?
 

Preitler

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When you meddle with the nest one of the three might be more interested in what you do than the other two.
A wildlive camera fixed above the nestbox and shielded so it only sees the entrance would reveal who's feeding.

Anyway, even if you don't find out it doesn't matter much, other does around imho are a good thing. I'm pretty sure one of mine even started to lactate once the kits started to pester her :D
 

Johndxu

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Yes, the color of the nest fur is the best way because your female bunnies are all differant colors. If you can't, you can check the breasts of the females. Usually she has bigger nipples.
 
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When you meddle with the nest one of the three might be more interested in what you do than the other two.
A wildlive camera fixed above the nestbox and shielded so it only sees the entrance would reveal who's feeding.

Anyway, even if you don't find out it doesn't matter much, other does around imho are a good thing. I'm pretty sure one of mine even started to lactate once the kits started to pester her :D
That's amazing! We keep our does together and the kits have often tried to nurse from each other's mom's.
 

ISAC QUIN HOOER

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Update: Sadly, Our little runt died last night. this morning the rest of our litter died. they looked like they hadn't been fed last night. it was 48-ish degrees last night so that mixed with not being fed is why they died. There was no fur ANYWHERE. Jan (the mom) was definitely the mother. she brought food up to the litter, and had bigger nipples than the rest. All of the rabbits were a pink-ish color so they would of grown up to be white. The first night they were definitely fed. they were all fattened up. they will be with us always.😢 Thanks for all the help you guys.
 

Preitler

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Aww, sorry. :(

No fur is bad, they can't keep their body temperature up without a well insulated nest, and if they are too cold their digestion doesn't work.
Sometimes that instinkt doesn't kick in, or stress wreakes havoc and drones out that little voice in their head that tries to tell them what to to next - with other does in a rather crowded hutch that might be the cause. Although I keep my does together and it is no problem once the kits are there, i do give the mum rest and privacy and seperate when she gives birth, well, if I notice in time.
I do keep a stock of fur from old or false nests, and from brushing for such instances, like when too much fur got soiled, but other stuff could be used in a pinch.
 

ISAC QUIN HOOER

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Aww, sorry. :(

No fur is bad, they can't keep their body temperature up without a well insulated nest, and if they are too cold their digestion doesn't work.
Sometimes that instinkt doesn't kick in, or stress wreakes havoc and drones out that little voice in their head that tries to tell them what to to next - with other does in a rather crowded hutch that might be the cause. Although I keep my does together and it is no problem once the kits are there, i do give the mum rest and privacy and seperate when she gives birth, well, if I notice in time.
I do keep a stock of fur from old or false nests, and from brushing for such instances, like when too much fur got soiled, but other stuff could be used in a pinch.
Thanks you very much. Also, thanks for the idea for keeping the hair for insulation. They probably didn't want to nurse last night, because their digestive system didn't work...
Thanks. 🐰
 
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Aww, sorry. :(

No fur is bad, they can't keep their body temperature up without a well insulated nest, and if they are too cold their digestion doesn't work.
Sometimes that instinkt doesn't kick in, or stress wreakes havoc and drones out that little voice in their head that tries to tell them what to to next - with other does in a rather crowded hutch that might be the cause. Although I keep my does together and it is no problem once the kits are there, i do give the mum rest and privacy and seperate when she gives birth, well, if I notice in time.
I do keep a stock of fur from old or false nests, and from brushing for such instances, like when too much fur got soiled, but other stuff could be used in a pinch.
Good idea to keep fur!
 

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