Can bunny's drink tea?

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b.tate

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Hi all,

I had a bunny pass away from gastro as he became dehydrated. I have seen one of my bunnies has a bit of a runny tummy and now I'm freaking out about her becoming dehydrated! She is drinking and eating fine, maybe I am just being over dramatic. I saw online that if you would like to get your bunny to drink try adding tea to their water so it tastes better but online I am seeing mixed reviews about bunnies drinking tea. Any advice on what I should do? At the moment I am just trying to make sure she stays hydrated.

I have two teas at home, rooibos and Mango rooibos tea.
 

Apollo’s Slave

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Rabbits can’t drink tea like humans can. However you can brew flowers (rose, chamomile, blue mallow, fennel etc) in hot water, wait for it to cool down and then give it to them. Instead I’d recommend soaking their veggies in water before feeding it to her, especially if she’s not got any GI problems. I’m really sorry about your other bunny :(
 

Preitler

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Isn't the term "infusion" or so, if it's not black tea?

Anyway, I think it would be counterproductive. It would make water taste stale, and empty, making her to drink less.

There was a hype about apple cider vingar in drinking water some time ago, very little, a tablespoon per gallon or liter or so, but from what I've read the only effect was to attract those tiny black flies.
 

John Wick

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Do you provide water via bottle or bowl? Water bowls tend to facilitate more water drinking because there's less room for equipment error and it takes less effort to get water from a bowl than a bottle (from the rabbit's perspective). Water bowls do need to be refreshed/cleaned often, as you can imagine they easily get dirty and can grow various -icky- things, making a rabbit then reluctant to drink out of them.

I have not done this myself, but I've read about 'hay tea' being helpful for some rabbits: Hay tea - For anybunny who doesn't drink enough, especially for ill or recovering rabbits | BinkyBunny
 

Preitler

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Hm. In my opinion, a healthy rabbit knows how much to drink. They have a very good feeling for what is good for them - when they had a chance to learn to listen to their bodys. That is something that is hugly messed up with humans in our western society, very few drink just plain water when they are thirsty, and I don't think projecting that on rabbits and messing around with the most natural behaviour is a good thing.

If there isn't a medical reason to get them to drink more I would just offer plain, clean water. I reckon I'm in a privileged position here, with completly untreated ground water, and a creek where they can drink, so I would consider water quality before adding stuff.
 

Apollo’s Slave

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Hm. In my opinion, a healthy rabbit knows how much to drink. They have a very good feeling for what is good for them - when they had a chance to learn to listen to their bodys. That is something that is hugly messed up with humans in our western society, very few drink just plain water when they are thirsty, and I don't think projecting that on rabbits and messing around with the most natural behaviour is a good thing.

If there isn't a medical reason to get them to drink more I would just offer plain, clean water. I reckon I'm in a privileged position here, with completly untreated ground water, and a creek where they can drink, so I would consider water quality before adding stuff.
I agree with this. I think OP is just worried (which is understandable due to their previous bunny) that something will happen to their bunny, but they did say that it was fine.

All I’d say, is give your bunny a clean bowl of fresh water. If your tap water is gross, you can use filtered or bottled water. I would change the water every day, especially in summer, even if bunny drinks it or not. That way you can monitor how much they drink. If you soak their veggies in water before feeding them, they’ll likely drink less than usual
 

AVIE

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I understand the fundamentals. The Dr suggested the Pedialyte because she was having stasis issues with what we believe was fur blockage. He wanted her to increase her water intake to help flush her tract. No, it's not something I would have for her all the time.
 

Madelyn L.

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Chamomile tea leaves can be dried for treats, or soaked in water for a treat. Just don’t give them too much, and they should be fine. Also, small amounts of fruit/veggie juice in their water should entice them to drink it.
 

Cinn-a-bun

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Rabbits can’t drink tea like humans can. However you can brew flowers (rose, chamomile, blue mallow, fennel etc) in hot water, wait for it to cool down and then give it to them. Instead I’d recommend soaking their veggies in water before feeding it to her, especially if she’s not got any GI problems. I’m really sorry about your other bunny :(
That's what I do. Soak her lettuce in water.
 

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