Can a peanut be saved?

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HappyFarmBunnies

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For anyone who's been following my posts, you'll know I've had a bit of a rough go of it with my most recent Holland Lop litter. Of the original six, I had one stillborn fetal giant and one perfectly healthy kit that died on Day 1. I also have a peanut, that for awhile I was hoping was just a runt. I hand-feed Cassie with goat's milk twice a day, but it's becoming clear (on Day 6 now) that even with my intervention, she is simply not growing and developing as her siblings are, who are getting in lots of fur and growing huge.

I suppose I'm at a bit of a crossroads here--being stubborn and dedicated, I am determined not to give up on her. But after hours of research, a small voice in the back of my mind is beginning to wonder if in fact I am doing her a disservice. Do I have to be cruel to be kind? Can peanuts EVER be saved, or am I just prolonging my own heartbreak and her unhappy life?




In comparison with her littermate, Kern.
 

melbaby80

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If it were me I'd do all I could till she let go on her own. You never know what could happen and if she does pass then you know you gave her a fighting chance.
 

Bunnylova4eva

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melbaby80 wrote:
If it were me I'd do all I could till she let go on her own. You never know what could happen and if she does pass then you know you gave her a fighting chance.
I agree 100% This is what the breeder I got Ripley from told me she always does. I have heard of rare stories of them suriving: http://barbibrownsbunnies.com/micro.htm (that's one of them) I'll keep her in my prayers.
 

ZRabbits

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Thanks Mia for posting that website about that tiny "peanut" that survived. That's definitely one in a million.

Peanuts in the dwarf breed have it hard. They already are behind the eight ball because their digestive systems aren't really formed, or their back legs, or sometimes their skull and ears aren't formed right. It's just genetics and it's a death sentence for this sweet bunny. Whether 3 days or 3 weeks, the bunny will suffer because of the genetic deformity. It's body just is not formed right.

It's an individual's call on what to do with peanuts. And whatever that individual feels they should do, whether letting them live as long as possible with lots of aid, or gently stopping the suffering humanely, should not be frown on by anyone.

As a breeder, you know, that's why that little voice is talking. 99.9% die. But like Mia posted, it could be that "one in a million" peanut that will survive. It's really a hard call, but knowing the genetics part of double dwarf gene, I would seriously feel bad knowing it's suffering. And knowing that no matter what I do, 99.9% will pass.

So sorry you are going through this, but it is part of the world of breeding dwarfs.

K:)
 

majorv

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That's one of the toughest parts of being a breeder - knowing you can't save them all. Doesn't matter whether its a peanut or a runt that isn't thriving. I was devastated when we lost a litter of 4 when Mom abandoned them during week 2...especially after I'd done everything I could to save them.

You try to save the ones you think have the best chance and let nature take its course for the others. It's not easy, I know.
 

Bonnie Lee

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I'm really sorry this is happening to you :(

I think what you have done is amazing. I personally think you have gotten this far and she's scraping by and holding on as much as she can I think until you mentally can not take it anymore to keep going at it you should keep trying. This is only my opinion and I'm only saying this because I feel if you aren't mentally ready to let her go you will keep wondering and it would be too upsetting. Unless you think she's really hurting and suffering I think you should keep trying until you can't take it any longer. Xx
 

HappyFarmBunnies

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Thank you for all of the kind words and support, everyone. This is truly difficult for me. I know it's part of the game when breeding, but I'm the type of girl who shoos spiders out of the house with a magazine and a gentle suggestion of "Why don't you go get some fresh air outside?"

Thank you for the links about the surviving peanuts. What I found most interesting was that both of them got to that point LARGELY without human intervention. That makes me believe that nature allowed them to have a better shot.

For what it's worth, Cassie does not appear to be in any pain or unhappiness; she just looks exactly the same as she did on Day 2 as she does today on Day 7. (What's more painful, for both of us, is the drop-by-painstaking-drop feedings twice a day, with her often breathing in the milk and choking and me agonizing...)

Yesterday I decided to listen to the little voice of painful reality in my head and not feed her. When I checked on her last night, she was wiggling around and her belly looked to be full, surprisingly.

So, thank you all. Blessed be, sweet little Cassie. I will let Mother Nature do what she will, as she often knows best. I'll keep all of you posted. Thank you.
 

ZRabbits

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HappyFarmBunnies wrote:
Thank you for all of the kind words and support, everyone. This is truly difficult for me. I know it's part of the game when breeding, but I'm the type of girl who shoos spiders out of the house with a magazine and a gentle suggestion of "Why don't you go get some fresh air outside?"

Thank you for the links about the surviving peanuts. What I found most interesting was that both of them got to that point LARGELY without human intervention. That makes me believe that nature allowed them to have a better shot.

For what it's worth, Cassie does not appear to be in any pain or unhappiness; she just looks exactly the same as she did on Day 2 as she does today on Day 7. (What's more painful, for both of us, is the drop-by-painstaking-drop feedings twice a day, with her often breathing in the milk and choking and me agonizing...)

Yesterday I decided to listen to the little voice of painful reality in my head and not feed her. When I checked on her last night, she was wiggling around and her belly looked to be full, surprisingly.

So, thank you all. Blessed be, sweet little Cassie. I will let Mother Nature do what she will, as she often knows best. I'll keep all of you posted. Thank you.
Mother Nature sometimes in my eyes can be cruel. Such sweet little baby. But have to sadly admit she is wise.

Will be thinking of you and Cassie. Hoping Cassie beats the odds and proves Mother Nature wrong. But if not, hoping Mother Nature makes up her mind fast for both of your sake.

K:(
 

melbaby80

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HappyFarmBunnies wrote:
Thank you for all of the kind words and support, everyone. This is truly difficult for me. I know it's part of the game when breeding, but I'm the type of girl who shoos spiders out of the house with a magazine and a gentle suggestion of "Why don't you go get some fresh air outside?"

Thank you for the links about the surviving peanuts. What I found most interesting was that both of them got to that point LARGELY without human intervention. That makes me believe that nature allowed them to have a better shot.

For what it's worth, Cassie does not appear to be in any pain or unhappiness; she just looks exactly the same as she did on Day 2 as she does today on Day 7. (What's more painful, for both of us, is the drop-by-painstaking-drop feedings twice a day, with her often breathing in the milk and choking and me agonizing...)

Yesterday I decided to listen to the little voice of painful reality in my head and not feed her. When I checked on her last night, she was wiggling around and her belly looked to be full, surprisingly.

So, thank you all. Blessed be, sweet little Cassie. I will let Mother Nature do what she will, as she often knows best. I'll keep all of you posted. Thank you.
:pray::pray::pray::pray: Really hope she pulls through.
 

HappyFarmBunnies

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Glory be! Today is Day 8, and when I checked on the gang this morning LO AND BEHOLD, Cassie appears to have grown, AND, "changed spots" on me--I could have sworn that she was a broken blue, but now it looks like she's a broken chocolate. Granted, she's not nearly as big as her siblings...but she is finally growing, and hanging in there!






 

melbaby80

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Oh my goodness they are so adorable. YAY cassie!!She has won me over 100% lol She is adorable!! That white one is huge! lol Uggg I just wanna jump through my screen and cuddle them.
 

Bunnylova4eva

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snowflakesmama wrote:
WOWW!!! AWESOME STORY!!! Chances were slim , everyone also said so ... And wow.. You did not give up on her !!! congrats!!! Praise the Lord.
:yeahthat:
 
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