buying bunnies site unseen

Help Support RabbitsOnline:

Deanna

Member
Joined
Sep 21, 2013
Messages
5
Reaction score
0
Location
NULL
Hi! I am trying to get into the rabbit arena and eventually be homesteading on several acres of land. At present, I live in town with my family and my 2 does and a buck in my laundry room.
In my efforts to purchase new stock or get a stud service I've found that I am expected to take the rabbit offered and meeting at a specified public location. This was even the way I was told that the stud service was offered: in the parking lot of Dollar General in the back of my van. I ended up purchasing a completely different buck so that I didn't need to do that anymore!
I have found it very difficult to 'break' into the community and I'm wondering if this is normal for rabbit selling/purchasing or if some people actually go to the house/farm/ranch and get to choose the rabbit they are paying for?
Please hear me, I'm all for safety. I get wanting to not have strangers around my house. I don't really want that either. Except, if you're going to be selling a good or service and you work out of your home, it seems to me that there will be some people coming and going.
Thanks for your thoughts!
 

Korr_and_Sophie

Well-Known Member
Joined
Dec 31, 2006
Messages
4,215
Reaction score
229
Location
Calgary, Alberta, Canada
Most breeders don't invite people onto their property. They can't really know what your intentions are and they want to protect themselves. Many animal rights extremists will pose as a buyer to see where the rabbits are kept and might then call animal control. This can cause a lot of problems for some people and they would just rather be safe than sorry. Some won't even invite other breeders over, usually it is only people they know and trust. There is also the possibility of someone bringing something onto the property that could make the rabbits sick. You never know where someone has been or what they have touched.

I know some will meet you and bring a few rabbits for your to choose from. Generally, you do have an idea on what you are looking for, so the breeder can pick a few that would fit what you want. If you want a young buck, they aren't going to bring an adult doe. Most breeders don't have a lot for sale, so it is usually you pick one you like. If for some reason you don't like the rabbit once you see it or you think there could be a health issue (runny nose, etc), then you should not feel obligated to purchase the rabbit.

Most breeders don't offer a stud service. There are some STIs that can be passed from the doe to the buck, so they want to protect their buck. Some only have a few bucks they use, so anything the buck gets could be passed to their does. Breeders to tend to prefer to just buy their own bucks.

Try to keep at it. Attend a show if you can. Shows let you meet a lot of breeders and can be a good place to buy rabbits. You can see some variety from one person and may get a bit of choice.
 
Joined
Jan 8, 2011
Messages
3,464
Reaction score
721
Location
Texas
I think I'd steer clear of anyone who expects you to do this. What breed are you interested in? I agree that going to shows around you and getting to know breeders there is a good start. They can bring some rabbits to a show for you to look at. Buying a rabbit sight unseen isn't a good idea. You should always have the option of changing your mind once you've had a chance to see a rabbit in person. I've seen breeders mating their rabbits at shows, but it's usually planned and the breeders already know each other.
 

Deanna

Member
Joined
Sep 21, 2013
Messages
5
Reaction score
0
Location
NULL
I do get the safety issues.
Shows are a good idea. I will work at getting to a few.
Thanks!
 

RabbitGirl101

Well-Known Member
Joined
Jul 2, 2013
Messages
484
Reaction score
83
Location
Michigan, USA
When I sell my rabbits, I never allow potential buyers to go to my house or in my barn. I usually ask that they meet me in a public space as well. Usually a parking lot outside of a restaurant. I do this because I don't know if the potential buyer is an activist who is just trying to report me for breeding rabbits so they can try to take them away to get spayed/neutered , and also for my own safety. If someone isn't willing to meet me in a public space then I don't meet with them. I don't know if they are planning on harming me or my rabbits, so my general rule of thumb is if a buyer isn't willing to purchase a rabbit in a public space then the sale is a no go. As with the studding out a rabbit. I also do not do this unless I am very good friends with the other party. I also look at the type of the rabbit I am getting a stud from/or studding out (which I don't do) I wouldn't want my rabbits getting any diseases and because I want to make sure that my rabbits with pedigree's are only the best rabbits that can contribute to bettering the breed. The only time I have had my rabbits bred by another breeder was when I purchased a rabbit and while they where still at their original barn, they were bred. Otherwise studding out is another no go for me.
 
Joined
Jan 8, 2011
Messages
3,464
Reaction score
721
Location
Texas
I think the meeting in a public place scenario is more common when buying/selling rabbits for pets or for pet breeding, because you typically don't know the other person...but buying/selling between breeders with show or brood stock is typically done different.
 

woahlookitsme

Well-Known Member
Joined
Sep 27, 2009
Messages
4,194
Reaction score
593
Location
, Texas, USA
I pretty much am the same thing as majorv. As far as stud services I only offer those or get them from people I know. How I meet those people are through rabbit showing. A typical scenario for studding is the owner of the buck either gets payment for the service or their pick of the litter. pick of the litter is normally what I do since I and others only choose rabbits that compliment the one we own so getting an offspring that is better than the parent is the ideal situation.
 

Bill Jesse

Well-Known Member
Joined
Aug 17, 2010
Messages
317
Reaction score
9
Location
Victoria, British Columbia, Canada
I didn't go through these posts word for word so maybe I missed this but are you breeding for meat? If you are that is one thing but if you just want to increase the herd why bother breeding when there are so many beautiful rabbits waiting for adoption?
My 2 cents.
 

blwinteler

Well-Known Member
Joined
Aug 23, 2013
Messages
498
Reaction score
207
Location
Henderson, NV
I didn't even think about this, but probably because I was looking at pets, not breeding. I met the lady from the shelter in a public place. I could not be happier with my boys. I did have pictures before I got them.
 

Korr_and_Sophie

Well-Known Member
Joined
Dec 31, 2006
Messages
4,215
Reaction score
229
Location
Calgary, Alberta, Canada
I didn't even think about this, but probably because I was looking at pets, not breeding. I met the lady from the shelter in a public place. I could not be happier with my boys. I did have pictures before I got them.
I have heard of quite a few cases where someone gets a sick rabbit. They meet in a parking lot, usually when it is dark. The person getting the rabbit doens't get a good look at them until they are home. It might not even be a sick rabbit, but one that is not what the person expected. It really should not matter why you want the rabbit, photos and at least the chance to say no can go a long way. It is about protecting yourself, no one really wants to get a very sick rabbit that has to be put down the next day or be expecting one thing and get something different. Photos don't show everything either.
 

NorthernAutumn

Autumn - Administrator
Joined
May 25, 2008
Messages
5,244
Reaction score
117
Location
London / North Bay, Ontario, Canada
Agreed, you would want to see the facilities that your studding rabbit is coming from. I can appreciate a public chitchat meeting, but I would have deep concerns about the health/disease aspect if I hadn't seen the home facilities. I'd encourage you to look up your regional rabbit association, or local breed specific association, and talk to the president of the organization. They may be able to direct you to some quality breeders in your area.
 

Deanna

Member
Joined
Sep 21, 2013
Messages
5
Reaction score
0
Location
NULL
I appreciate the replies. Yes, they are meat and so my stock quality is important. I'm learning huge things and I love to hear others thoughts. I have finally found someone, that meets me still in public, but is very open to having text conversations and answering questions. So, I think I'm getting there!
 
Top