BunnyVac Pasteurella Vaccine

Discussion in 'Health & Wellness' started by Bob Glass, Jun 20, 2013.

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  1. Jun 20, 2013 #1

    Bob Glass

    Bob Glass

    Bob Glass

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    BunnyVac is a USDA licensed killed Pasteurella product for prevention of Pasteurella infection in rabbits. Information on the product is available and questions will be answered here.
     
  2. Jun 20, 2013 #2

    woahlookitsme

    woahlookitsme

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    When do you expect a published paper to become available to read?
     
  3. Jun 20, 2013 #3

    Kipcha

    Kipcha

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    Forgive my ignorance on the subject of vaccines, but how does it work for the 80% of rabbits that already carry the bacteria? It's a preventative, right? So wouldn't it be useless on most?
     
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  4. Jun 21, 2013 #4

    Bob Glass

    Bob Glass

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    We hope to publish the full data from th eUSDA clinical trial and Field safety study, but I don't know when that will happen. For now we are providing the summary document from the clinical trial to anyone who wants it. I tried to attach it to this thread but I guess it didn't work. If you can tell me how to do that I will try again, otherwise I can send it to you via email. If you want it send me an email at bglass@pavlab.com

    The vaccine is licensed for prevention of infection and will, over time, establish a herd that is immune to Pasteurella. The benefit of treating infected animals has not studied or proven. However, there are anecdotal reports of significant to complete resolution of nasal drainage (snot) in some of these animals. We don't have controlled study data for this observation but plan to investigate. If the vaccine proves to reduce nasal drainage that should help to reduce the spread of the disease. If the vaccine will establish immunity in non infected animals and reduce spread of infectious snot from those already infected it will be a valuable tool in controlling this disease.
     
  5. Jun 23, 2013 #5

    james waller

    james waller

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    it is a well known fact,--prey animals (lagamorphs) must have a balanced eco-system of certain bacteria,s-in their gi tract flora-,,-through environmental factors,pain,other disorders which are stressfull-can and do trigger the immune system--off balance of proper flora,-increasing the problem,,--bacterias are controlled with antibiotics which would be the least destructive to their gi-tract-,,this is why culture/blood tests are performed//--dead cells of a given virus are used for an immunization,--please provide proper info for your acertians,--and I donot believe in such an immunization is possible,--sincerely james waller--:bunnynurse::nurse:
     
  6. Jun 23, 2013 #6

    Bob Glass

    Bob Glass

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    If I understand the question it seems you don't believe killed bacterial immunizations will induce protective immune response? Killed bacterial vaccine (more properly referred to as bacterins) have been in use for many years in humans and other species. Some examples are Tetanus, diphtheria, pertussis, Haemophilus and Cholera in humans. In veterinary medicines Pasteurella vaccines have been in use in other species such as Cattle, sheep, goats and swine for years and have been proven effective in preventing this disease. This vaccine is the same concept but optimized for rabbits. It's not that it couldn't be done, it just hadn't been done before now. If I have misunderstood the question please explain it to me again so that I may make an appropriate response.
     
  7. Jun 26, 2013 #7

    ZoeStevens

    ZoeStevens

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    That's like asking why make a polio vaccine since it will be useless on people already have it... If this vaccine is successful, it would (ideally) become the standard (like vaccinating cats and dogs against leukemia, distemper etc at 8 weeks of age).

    I believe that james is suggesting that the vaccine, or the process of administering it, would stress the rabbit and potentially cause GI upset...? Would a dead vaccine affect GI flora in any way? Aside from localized pain and stiffness and I do not believe that vaccines impact the GI tract.

    Question for OP:
    Would the vaccine work on rabbits who have been potentially exposed to the virus, but aren't symptomatic? Are there various strains?
     
    Last edited: Jun 26, 2013
  8. Jun 27, 2013 #8

    Bob Glass

    Bob Glass

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    Any foreign material has the potential to cause some level of GI stress but we have not seen any such issue with this product so far. We have seen rabbits that have an injection site reaction in the form of a "knot". It appears to happen in +/-10% of the rabbits vaccinated and in most cases this the knots appear to resolve in a week or two. some animals show some lethargy and may go off feed for a day or so, this is due to a good strong immune response to the vaccine.

    We do not have data from any controlled studies to document the effect of this vaccine in infected/symptomatic rabbits but there are anecdotal reports of diminished symptoms (snot/sneezing) in such cases. We don't know if these rabbits are clear of the infection, but less snot and sneezing should mean less transmission of the disease to other rabbits.

    The vaccine has a single strain of Pasteurella multocida from the group that is associated with respiratory infection/disease. It is important to understand that the vaccine is a whole cell preparation and the goal is to stimulate immune response to many parts of the bacteria including the cell wall proteins which are shared by most strains of Pasteurella.
     
  9. Jun 27, 2013 #9

    ZoeStevens

    ZoeStevens

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    Thank you. Are there any reports or case studies we could review? Any plans for availability in Canada?
     
  10. Jun 28, 2013 #10

    Bunnylova4eva

    Bunnylova4eva

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    My [rabbit savvy] vet told me about the vaccine they have tried to pioneer for Pasturella. He said it did not work well and had side effects making it not at all practical.

    I think it's a nice idea, and this is coming from someone who has lost several possibly Pasturella buns. But, until the vaccine is refined and known to work well with very few reactions, it is just not practical and I am not using it with my buns.
     
  11. Jun 28, 2013 #11

    Bob Glass

    Bob Glass

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    Efficacy and safety data developed in USDA sanctioned studies has been found sufficient to warrant licensure of this product by the USDA. I have attached a summary of those studies and a general information document to this thread. The only side effects that have been reported are some (+/-10% of injected rabbits) injection site reactions in the form of small knots/sterile granulomas. Most of these clear without any treatment in 7-14 days. While it would be nice to not have any of these reactions it seems an acceptable side effect to achieve protective immunity and prevent death due to Pasteurella.

    Unfortunately we have not found a Canadian distributor for this product. If you know any that may be interested please have them contact us.

    bglass@pavlab.com

    View attachment BunnyVac Clinical Trial Summary pdf.pdf

    View attachment BunnyVac informtiton pdf.pdf
     
  12. Jul 26, 2013 #12

    james waller

    james waller

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    --bunnylova4eva--I am so sorry to hear you lost bunzs due to pasturella related illness,s---I just lost an 8yr.old bun to heat related death,--as I have tried to explain to bob,--pasturella is present in the gi tract of all rabbits --it is activated by stress related environments,,health,etc,etc.--which in return stimulates the overgrowth of other bad bacterias creating further havoc --illnesses--which the immune system cannot handle,,thusly killing ..lagamorhs hide their illnesses to the point of dying,,--the immune system is the key-it must be protected by being kept healthy at all times,,--probiotics,,proper nourishment, and a very good understaning of lagamorphs and their gi tract is essential,,..--we bunny lovers sometimes forget that the rabbits are hard wired to react against-predators-(we are the predators )--I use cameras,monitors,and motion sensors in my facility for surveillance due to my disabilities,love and concern, --some day,,somehow pasturella will be a lesser concern for these beautiful creatures--it might be evolutionary-?-(darwin)---I commend everyone for the care they give these magnificent creatures,,--I donot condem anyone who at least tries,,-sincerely and all my best to you bunnylover4eva,-james waller--:bunnyheart:nod:bunny17::anotherbun:great::adorable::energizerbunny:
     
  13. Jul 27, 2013 #13

    crimson

    crimson

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    I know a rabbit breeder who vaccinated her herd with it a few weeks ago.
     
  14. Jul 29, 2013 #14

    james waller

    james waller

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    --please keep us informed,,could you please inform R-O-L,as to the reasoning behind this action--ie.high risk of snuffles,??--sincerely james waller--:idea:biggrin2:
     
  15. Sep 21, 2013 #15

    bunnychild

    bunnychild

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    Where can I purchase it?
     
  16. Sep 22, 2013 #16

    Bob Glass

    Bob Glass

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    BunnyVac can be ordered by email to bglass@pavlab.com or by calling 800 856 9655.

    I need:

    Name
    Shipping address (not PO box)
    Telephone
    Email address

    and number 20 dose vials ($20 each)
    Number 50 dose vials ($40 each)

    shipping is $10 per oder.
     
  17. Mar 13, 2018 #17

    Apu

    Apu

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    This is an old thread, but hopefully the OP is still subscribed. I'm wondering if there have been any changes to the situation commented on below. Thanks!

    'Unfortunately we have not found a Canadian distributor for this product. If you know any that may be interested please have them contact us.'
     

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