Quantcast

Bunny smells like unwashed arm pit ?

Help Support RabbitsOnline:

Jenni

Well-Known Member
Joined
Apr 22, 2006
Messages
278
Reaction score
0
Location
Texas, , USA
These little wild bunnies seem happy andhealthy!! While, you shouldn't go and capture a wild bun as a pet, ifone has been nursed back to health and saved from certain suffering anddeath, and is happy and healthy, I can't see how anyone can disapprove.

I rescued an adolescent bun from a cat's jawsonetime. I called the wildlife people and they told me to set itfree near where I found it. The next night, I heard itscreaming, went outside, and saw it bloody running through thewoods. It didn't have a chance. I know I did theright thing, but sometimes I wish I would have kept it.
:cry4:

 

Bo B Bunny

Well-Known Member
Joined
Nov 23, 2004
Messages
17,800
Reaction score
3
Location
, Indiana, USA
Jenni, that's something important too - he wasprobably weakened by the cat situation and predatory animals can sensethat about the ones they are chasing.....

It's all about common sense and realistic situations. I think sometimes we get too tied up with the "red tape".....
 

ec

Well-Known Member
Joined
Jun 26, 2006
Messages
989
Reaction score
0
Location
, ,
Sas (and all), I deeply appreciate seeing inputfrom an experienced rehabber on this thread - and strongly believe thatthe things they've said are very relevant, as the thread isn'tabout a domestic bunny, but a wild one living with humans.

Again, no moral judgements meant on my part - but there are some majorethical issues here that can't really be ducked, and your comment re.spaying *wild* bunnies sort of pushes the stakes a bit higher. ;)
 

Pipp

Well-Known Member
Joined
Mar 1, 2005
Messages
12,878
Reaction score
50
Location
Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada
ec wrote:
Again,no moral judgements meant on my part - but there are some major ethicalissues here that can't really be ducked, and your comment re. spaying*wild* bunnies sort of pushes the stakes a bit higher. ;)
I didn't have a comment about spaying, I had a question.That's an odd interpretation.It was recommended asan option by posters before the 'wild' part came up. I shareyour concerns.

I really agree with the red tape comment. And I'm REALLY notmaking judgements in this thread, but I find that an awful lot ofpeople involved in rescue work spend an awful lot of timeonsweepinggeneralities and yes, 'ethics', and notenough onthe realities of individual cases. Inother words, they seem to want to spend a LOT of timearguing.I'm sorry, but I just don't find thatproductive.

Some great information has come out in this thread, though.

sas
 

likitten007

Member
Joined
Jul 29, 2006
Messages
6
Reaction score
0
Location
, ,
This is a really good discussion!;)

SAS - there's some really good info out there on rehabilitating (not just *wabbits*) animals that have had human contact. We contstantly get animals in that people have had for weeks (or months).But most people really are doing their best, they just don't know - and it's always harder to treat injuries and wounds that have been sitting painfully for a long time. It's alsov. difficult to judge when a wild animal is 'happy' or content - a lot of thing we assoicate with being content, are also signs of shock and chronic stress; but it's a judgment call. One gull came in-the a finder had raised for 6 weeks (ugh....how she last that long with all the poop in her home is beyond me;)), but because he didn't have a proper diet his bones were brittle, underdeveloped, and feathering in poor poor condition (among other things).

You're right Bo B Bunny - vets can't treat and return an animal to the finder - they have to give them to a rehabber, and can only keep them for a specified length of time so that domestic patients aren't endangered. I should have clarified. I think I was thinking along the lines of a speuter. We have one clinic that is open 24hrs that will hold an animal for us for a few hours (e.g. until we re-open in the morning), stablize etc.,until a volunteer can get to the area to transport it to us.

Back to the question re: prolongued human interaction -
A rehabber would never ever release an animal that they did not think could evade a predator etc.Animal kept by humanslearn whaat is and isn't dangerous, and this can bere-taught.When an animal comes in like this (I can't speak for every rehabber), they are isolated, have minimal human contact, any interaction (e.g. the animal coming toward you when the pen is opened)is discouraged. Much like conditioning (well, exactly like conditioning). You gradually see the animal return to it's natural state. It happens quite fast in animals that weren't in care as young babies (e.g. first few days of life).

When centres get in birds or animals easily imprinted at a young age,staff wear masks, etc. (You have no idea how hard it is tofeed a baby raven or gull using a puppet)!;)

So long story - short answer - the job of rehabbers is to give themback that "edge". They are often successful, and the animal has to go through a variety of tests (behavioural) prior to release to mnake sure it is in proper condition/form. About a month ago we admitted a squirrel that had been kept by the finder and bottle fed since he was a baby - at first he was so so overly friendly.Now he just as growly and evasive as a *normal* squirrel.Almost ready to go!

Oh Jenni - I'm so sorry - you did do the right thing.Sometimes you have to remember (this is hard for me too), that theremight have been some reason that the bun had been picked off by the dog(natural selection etc.) in the first place. Even if it wasnt' injured,it's survival of the fittest out there.The otherthing is, it may have had some minor injuries (often hard to tell overthe phone etc.), causing the animal to be either in shock, or it's bodyshunting resources toward healing rather than "fight or flight"responses. Regardless, you did your best, that's all anyonecan do.

Anyways, maybe just give a rehabber a call, they can give you advice(they would know more about american legislation than I do), and maybedirect you to a sanctuary of some sort.

In the end everyone has to make their own decisions. Keepingwild animals in captivity is one of those topics that I tend to findquiteupsetting andbe very sensitive of(comes withthe job), so I think I'll stay hands off from hear on out. Ihope that the information I've provided will be of some help inassisting people in these situations make decisions. Feel free to pm meif anyone is looking for info in this field.

P.S. I still laugh at the title of this thread. SAS, here'sthe link to the WRNBC (Wildlife Rehabilitators Network of BritishColumbia. The website has a list of local rehab centres inB.C. etc., and there is lots of info on thepages (as well ason the pages of those centres) on what to do if you find ananimal.http://www.wrn.bc.ca/
The International Wildlife Rehabilitation Council is http://www.iwrc-online.org/
 

ec

Well-Known Member
Joined
Jun 26, 2006
Messages
989
Reaction score
0
Location
, ,
Sas, I know you're in rescue, etc. - it's justthat (like likiten007) this subject does hit some nerves for me, and Ifeel uncomfortable with the suggestions about anonymous calls and theassumption that rehabbers would kill an animal that had become evenslightly accustomed to humans. The latter seems to be very muchagainst the ethics rehabbers are taught (or are supposed to betaught), though I realize that everyone has their own views, and thatin both rehab and rescue there are few absolutes; also that all of usmake bad decisions at times. (I'll put myself first in line here!)

I'm not intending to sound critical of anyone - but I have seenfrustration elsewhere, when someone who's "rescued" infant wild babieshas been angry at the idea of release, thinking that their effortswould "be lost" (or something like that). Equally, many of theresponses they were getting were entirely from a pet rabbit owners'persepective, and didn't have much of anything to do with the nature,behavior and psychology of wild rabbits.

I honestly can't imagine how difficult it must be to make the decisionsthat rescuers have to make (speaking of both domestic rabbit rescue andof wildlife rehab).

Anecdote: A few summers ago, a young wild rabbit (Eastern Cottontail)kept coming very, very close to me, out in my front yard. It wouldapproach as boldly as my pet rabbit does now, but then shy away aftergetting within less than 12 inches' distance. I was fascinated by thisrabbit, and wanted to follow it - it almost let me reach out to touchit numerous times. But I did hold back, and the rabbit shied away, too.This happened many times. I'm sure it had been hand-reared andreleased.

But even though it looked and seemed to act like a pet bunny, itwasn't. I'm so glad I didn't follow through on my impulse to touch thisanimal, or interfere with it in any way. (Believe me, I thought aboutit at times - trying to offer a treat, etc.) After a certain point, inever saw it again - and I have no idea whether it survived (lots ofdogs here) or not. But I'd like to believe that it did, and that itfound living in the brush to be ultimately more satisfying than tryingto hang out with humans. (FWIW, all kinds of wildlife traipses intothis neighborhood on a fairly regular basis - even bears, during theirmating season! And people *do* try to mess with them, which isdangerous and crazy.)

I don't think it would surprise you to know that I've consideredvolunteering to assist a rehabber and/or (at very least) making a visitto one of the rehabbers in my area.

I'll bow out of this discussion (which has been excellent, i think)now, too - hope this post helps clarify/explain where I'm coming from.

 

Fish keeper

Member
Joined
Oct 26, 2006
Messages
20
Reaction score
0
Location
Augusta, Georgia, USA
Man ... I don't know where to start . Been away from the computer for so long .:shock::);)
The bunny is the same one we bought last year . The man mywife bought the bunny breads the rabbits . So when we got hertiny rabbit self we could hold her in our hand .
Yes she is a girl . I am 30 years old and know that she is ... I will just leave it at that .
I like to turn her over and cradle her in my arms like ababy and use my fore finger to stroke up and down her nose .She is content and have had her outside a few times and she didn't runaway . At least for now anyway she hasn't run away. I know she will later though if we don't get her spaded. Any way the only thing I can say is I love my bunny bunny:).



And for the person who asked me about my fish outtacuriosity . I have 3 tanks one 75 US gal , and two20 US gal tanks . My home page is a link to my web site. The only thing I don't have on it is one of our20 gal tanks . It is a planted tank with a Betta fish , Bluedwarf Gourami , and a algae eater . Iwill see if the link works .





 

katt

Well-Known Member
Joined
Mar 19, 2006
Messages
1,866
Reaction score
2
Location
, Michigan, USA
not to be rude and question this, but are yousure your rabbit is a wild bunny and not simply a chestnut coloreddwarf (or some mix of dwarf)?

i only ask because you said that your wife got your bun from a man thatbreeds rabbits and i have never known anyone to breed a pair of wildrabbits. . .or maybe i am missing something. . . please correct me if iam wrong.
 

Haley

Well-Known Member
Joined
Jun 23, 2006
Messages
9,883
Reaction score
7
Location
Kalamazoo, Michigan, USA
Fish keeper wrote:
Man ... I don't know where to start . Been awayfrom the computer for so long .:shock::);)
The bunny is the same one we bought last year . The man mywife bought the bunny breads the rabbits . So when we got hertiny rabbit self we could hold her in our hand .

I like to turn her over and cradle her in my arms like ababy and use my fore finger to stroke up and down her nose .She is content and have had her outside a few times and she didn't runaway . At least for now anyway she hasn't run away. I know she will later though if we don't get her spaded. Any way the only thing I can say is I love my bunny bunny:) .
Wow..this has become a very interesting thread re: wild bunnies aspets. Im no expert, and Im just going by my gut, but if this rabbit wasborn and raised by humans and has lived with humans all its life, I'dsay it should not be released into the wild.

I know its illegal to keep a cottontail and all that, but in this case,I just cannot see how releasing her would be in her best interest.

I would however, report the guy who is breeding cottontails to your local authority!
 

Fish keeper

Member
Joined
Oct 26, 2006
Messages
20
Reaction score
0
Location
Augusta, Georgia, USA
It is like pics of eastern cotton tail rabbitbut the ears are long and slender . They are strate and are not floppyin any way . When she stretches out she is about 3 and a halffoot long easy . Big back feet . She has neverpounded the ground to show she was mad and I don't think she even has amad streak in her .
 

bluebird

Well-Known Member
Joined
Apr 14, 2004
Messages
1,981
Reaction score
5
Location
Washington, Pennsylvania, USA
I have heard this same story before also the itsgoing to be fed too snakes if you dont buy it story.I think the guy atthe flea market likes too make up stories.bluebird
 

katt

Well-Known Member
Joined
Mar 19, 2006
Messages
1,866
Reaction score
2
Location
, Michigan, USA
is it me or is this bun a little to big to be a wild cottontail?



(i hope you don't mind that i placed one of the photos up for people to see without needed to click the link).

what does everyone think?

 

MyBabyBunnies

Well-Known Member
Joined
Apr 4, 2004
Messages
5,503
Reaction score
4
Location
, ,
That rabbit doesn't look wild to me. I have afeeling the people who bred her had no idea what breed her parents wereand since the coloring is similar to wild rabbits, they just assumedthey were wild. I've never seen a cottontail that big.
 

katt

Well-Known Member
Joined
Mar 19, 2006
Messages
1,866
Reaction score
2
Location
, Michigan, USA
you know, the more i think about it, the more her being a wild rabbit doesn't make sense.

because if a breeder was raising meat rabbits, why raise cottontails?they don't get very big, and there are many more breeds of domesticrabbit that reach high weights.

i would be interested to find out the weight of this rabbit.

plus you can see the difference between this bun in question and BBB's wild little bun, clover.

fish keeper- you bunny looks a little too large, and a little to stockyto be a wild gal, plus her overall general appearance looks more like adomestic rabbit. . .

i would guess she is simply a mix breed rabbit, possibly a satin mix?
 

Latest posts

Top