Bunny Fur

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HappyThieves

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I picked up a bunny yesterday at theshelter. He looks like a Britannia Petite (in a butterscotchcolor--is this possible?). His about two years oldand has a GREAT personality--very curious and affectionate.

His fur is sooooo dull-not at all soft and silky like you'd expect arabbit to be. The shelter person said it was because they usekitty litter :shock:in the litter pans. We triedgiving him a "bath" with powder shampoo but it really didn't improvehis fur any.

I know that in cats you can tell a lot about their health from thecondition of their coats. Is this also true forbunnies? Could this fur issue be a bad sign of something,maybe even nutritionally related? He's eating fine here (ateall the timothy hay I gave him last night).

Any thoughts or advise?

(This is my first post here. We also have a two year oldMagpie Harlequin, a dog, three cats, a hamster, two degus, and ahandful of fish! The pets outnumbers us about 3:1!)
 

naturestee

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Welcome to the forum!

Kitty litter? Poor bun!:shock: I haven't heard of that affecting their coats, though.

What was he eating at the shelter? Rabbit fur can be affectedby nutrition, and it's quite possible that what he was eating at theshelter wasn't the best for him. I've seen this with my dwarfhotot girls. All they had to eat were cheap Walmartpellets. They had large soft poop that, after a fecal floatturned up negative, my vet said was from their food. Theirfur was dull, stiff, and harsh. It is now pretty soft.

So, when do we get pictures?;)
 

pamnock

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Health issues, parasites, diet, stressor seasonal molt may be responsible for the poor fur condition.

As already mentioned, photo would be of great help for us to venture some guesses on the breed/color.



Pam
 

bunnydude

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Welcome!

Diet can play a huge role in their coat condition. My bunnies coatimproved quite a bit when we switched to Oxbow pellets. I haveexperience with molting affecting my bunnies' coats. Devon is goingthrough a huge molt and his coat becomes a bit ragged if I don't brushhim every day.
 

HappyThieves

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Thanks for input!

Right now the little bun (I think the kids have named him"Butterscotch") is back at the shelter to be neutered. I'vebeen searching for information on his coat condition and the issue thatkeeps coming up is nutrition (poor thing!). Other than hisfur being so rough, he's perfect. There's no lethargy, hisdroppings are normal,his appetite is GREAT, and he's notmolting (the fur is even all over, it just feels like what a cat'sfeels like after you've put flea powder on it, KWIM?).

So, when he comes back tonight, wewill concentrate on making sure he gets fed all the best stuff!

Please, if you can think of any other reason for his fur to be so "un-soft," let me know!

Thanks for the warm welcome! I'llpost some picturesafter he's back on his feet again after his surgery!
 

pamnock

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Try to post some photos when he comes home. May just be an old "dead" coat or may be damaged from urine.

Has he been tested for parasites?



Too much protein in the diet can also cause a poor coat.



Pam
 

HappyThieves

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Okay--so both guys are back home and arerecovering nicely (now I can admit how worried I was about thesurgery!). Fudgey (our harlie) was looking for food thesecond we got him back! He ate quite a few dandelionsin thecar on the wayhome.The little one(Butterscotch-with the bad fur) was more interested in resting.

We put their cages right next to each other so they can sniff eachother and commiserate together over their lost "manhood!" I'mhoping this will helpthem become friends. (How to make thathappen, will be my next post....)

As far as Butterscotch's fur goes, it could be my imagination, but itseems just the slightest bit better. His ears and rightbehind themare softer . I have a feeling heprobably hasn't had hay in a while bc he has eaten SOOOOO much of itover the past 24 hours! I read that sunflower seeds are goodfor shiny fur. We use them as treats for our harlie (andother critters), any problem giving them to the little bun as part ofhis steady diet?

Also, I just read the nutritional facts on our feed and noticed that itis an alfalfa based kibble. Is there any reason I shouldswitch to a timothy based one instead? Fudgey has always usedthis feed and is quite healthy.

Thanks for all your thoughts!

-Karen

 

pamnock

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Sunflower seeds are high in fat, so should onlybe given occasionally. Pet or older rabbits often do betteron an timothy based pellet.

Pam
 

rabbitgirl

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My Holland buck hasa dull coat rightnow, a hint of the clouds of fur that will fly soon. It's spring moltseason here in the Midwest....that could be what you're seeing also, asPam mentioned.

Rose
 
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