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Hoppybunn

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Are holland lops the most difficult dwarf breed to raise successful litters, or is it the same with all dwarf breeds.?
 

SableSteel

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Holland lops are pretty difficult. The dwarf breeds with (relatively) big heads and little bodies are the hardest to breed and raise litters, I'd say. Netherland dwarfs, holland lops, britannia petite, etc.
 

Hoppybunn

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Holland lops are pretty difficult. The dwarf breeds with (relatively) big heads and little bodies are the hardest to breed and raise litters, I'd say. Netherland dwarfs, holland lops, britannia petite, etc.
Are you familiar with breeding Jersey Woolies? I'm contemplating adding them, are they diificult to breed, any issues?
 

SableSteel

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Are you familiar with breeding Jersey Woolies? I'm contemplating adding them, are they diificult to breed, any issues?
From what I've heard they're a bit easier to breed than netherlands and hollands but still a dwarf breed, so expect peanuts and small litters. Also make sure you are finding actual jersey woolies. a lot of "jersey woolies" people will sell are longhaired netherland dwarfs.
 

Hoppybunn

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From what I've heard they're a bit easier to breed than netherlands and hollands but still a dwarf breed, so expect peanuts and small litters. Also make sure you are finding actual jersey woolies. a lot of "jersey woolies" people will sell are longhaired netherland dwarfs.
Thank you, are they doing pedigrees and stating they are nd and or saying they are jw
 

Happy Hollands

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All dwarf breeds are pretty difficult to breed. Holland Lops (average 3-5 per litter) do throw bigger litters than Netherland Dwarfs and Lionheads (average 1-3 per litter). Since they all carry the dwarf gene, peanuts (deformed babies who never survive) are bound to pop up. Since they are a smaller build (typically under 4 lbs.), the litters are always smaller sized and some have singletons which take more effort to raise. Since HL have bigger heads and smaller bodies, their is a higher chance of babies getting stuck and the doe having a harder time kindling I've found. Also, dwarf breeds do not have the classic long rabbit face, instead they are flat-face which can lead to a few problems such as malloclusion if you aren't careful and selective on which lines you breed! Honestly, I really don't recommend a dwarf breed to start out with (breeding wise... they make excellent pets!). Bigger breeds tend to be simpler and a good beginner breeding project - I think this is because they have bigger litters and less disappointments! Then again, dwarf breeds rule the pet market and are relatively easy to sell compared to bigger, sometimes "less desirable due to their size" rabbits.
 

Preitler

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... Since they all carry the dwarf gene, peanuts (deformed babies who never survive) are bound to pop up. Since they are a smaller build (typically under 4 lbs.), the litters are always smaller sized and some have singletons which take more effort to raise. ..
Wouldn't using false dwarf does address some of those issues, they are somewhat larger, and no peanuts then, right?
 

Happy Hollands

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Wouldn't using false dwarf does address some of those issues, they are somewhat larger, and no peanuts then, right?
The only way to avoid peanuts is breeding false dwarf X false dwarf. That being said, it is very hard to guarantee if a rabbit is a false dwarf without breeding. Sure, weight plays a role, but most HL, for example, weigh under 4 lbs. so the weight difference is so small it is impossible to know for sure by just that! Even if you breed a false dwarf doe to a buck who is not proven, you could get peanuts. Both parents have to be a false dwarf to avoid peanuts, but even if one is a true dwarf then peanuts could most definitely pop up. But yes, I agree that PROVEN false dwarfs is a good place to start!!
 

Preitler

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Both parents have to be a false dwarf to avoid peanuts, but even if one is a true dwarf then peanuts could most definitely pop up.
Hm, I thought false dwarfs carry no dwarf gene, true dwarfs one, peanuts two. so the only way to get peanuts (25%) would be breeding two true dwarfs. Like, I only get Charlies when breeding two broken rabbits, not when one is solid.
Breeding two false dwarfs would not yield any dwarfs since the gene isn't there. With one true dwarf there would be 50/50 true and false dwarfs. With two true dwarfs 50% true, 25%false, and 25% peanuts?

Anyway, when it's almost impossible to tell if the gene is there or not without test breeding and seeing if peanuts pop up, well, I rather stick to my big chonkers :D
 

Happy Hollands

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Hm, I thought false dwarfs carry no dwarf gene, true dwarfs one, peanuts two. so the only way to get peanuts (25%) would be breeding two true dwarfs. Like, I only get Charlies when breeding two broken rabbits, not when one is solid.
Breeding two false dwarfs would not yield any dwarfs since the gene isn't there. With one true dwarf there would be 50/50 true and false dwarfs. With two true dwarfs 50% true, 25%false, and 25% peanuts?

Anyway, when it's almost impossible to tell if the gene is there or not without test breeding and seeing if peanuts pop up, well, I rather stick to my big chonkers :D
Yep you've got it! The main hardest thing is figuring out which buns are true and false dwarfs. While some are more obvious than others, the only way to tell for sure is via breeding.
 

Happy Hollands

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The only way to avoid peanuts is breeding false dwarf X false dwarf. That being said, it is very hard to guarantee if a rabbit is a false dwarf without breeding. Sure, weight plays a role, but most HL, for example, weigh under 4 lbs. so the weight difference is so small it is impossible to know for sure by just that! Even if you breed a false dwarf doe to a buck who is not proven, you could get peanuts. Both parents have to be a false dwarf to avoid peanuts, but even if one is a true dwarf then peanuts could most definitely pop up. But yes, I agree that PROVEN false dwarfs is a good place to start!!
I think I was confusing myself above haha. What I was trying to say is... You cannot guarantee if you will not get peanuts if you don't know 100% of the parents are true or false dwarfs. Many people (including myself at times) assume a bunny to be a false dwarf, but when they breed it to a true dwarf, they get peanuts - whoops! Definitely something every breeder wants to avoid!
 

majorv

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Dwarf breeds, where netherland dwarfs were used to develop the breed, have a chance of having peanuts. It helps to have pedigrees of the doe and buck where each rabbit generation indicates their weight, also.
We bred and raised Polish, which is a dwarf breed (ie- NDs were used on what was originally a larger Polish rabbit, to create a smaller more competitive Polish). We dealt with peanuts, but overall we found they were pretty good mothers and we didn’t have much problem with having litters.
 

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